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Wiberg, Charlotte
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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Wiberg, M. & Wiberg, C. (2018). Digital integration in the 3rd wave of mobile HCI: a key challenge for overcoming the inverted digital divide. International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 10(2), 57-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital integration in the 3rd wave of mobile HCI: a key challenge for overcoming the inverted digital divide
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, E-ISSN 1942-3918, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What does the 3rd wave of mobile computing hold for us, and what are the challenges ahead as we now move from the 1st and 2nd wave to the 3rd wave of mobile HCI? While the 1st wave enabled mobile computing on a basic level – including basic connectivity and the development of mobile devices – and while the 2nd wave was to a large extent about the development of mobile content (from digital services and apps, to services for storing our data in the cloud), the authors suggest that the 3rd wave of mobile computing is less technology-driven, but rather about what mobile computing can enable, and how mobile computing is increasingly a gateway to society at large. In this article, the authors focus specifically on this 3rd wave of mobile computing, and in particular on what they call an inverted digital divide – a state where the mobile technology is in place for its users, but where there is no access to the services in society that rely on mobile computing. In this article, the authors demonstrate this inverted digital divide through a number of examples where they show how this plays out for different groups of people where this is vital in a global world – e.g., visitors to a country such as tourists, immigrants and even people applying for asylum. The authors discuss what is needed in order to bridge this divide and they outline its implications for the further development of mobile services. In concluding this paper, the authors suggest that “digital integration” might serve as a key notion for resolving these issues as we now enter the 3rd wave of mobile HCI.

National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
computer and systems sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145679 (URN)10.4018/IJMHCI.2018040103 (DOI)000431082900004 ()
Available from: 2018-03-14 Created: 2018-03-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, C. (2018). Game-inspired architecture and architecture-inspired games. interactions, 25(2), 68-70
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Game-inspired architecture and architecture-inspired games
2018 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 68-70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2018
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
computer and systems sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145670 (URN)10.1145/3177814 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, C. (2018). Sports IT and Digital Wellness: Three Waves of Digital Transformation in Sports and Training. In: Kurosu M. (Ed.), Human-Computer Interaction. Interaction in Context.: . Paper presented at HCI International 2018: 20th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Las Vegas, Nevada, July 15-20, 2018. Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sports IT and Digital Wellness: Three Waves of Digital Transformation in Sports and Training
2018 (English)In: Human-Computer Interaction. Interaction in Context. / [ed] Kurosu M., Springer, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the recent twenty years, people have developed a close relationship with digital technology in conducting sports and training. Initially, approximately 1995–2005, the first wave of Sport IT included technology as GPS watches and pulse measurement equipment connected to rudimentary digital services, designed by the brand delivering the watch and only available for the single user’s needs. In the second wave, between years 2006–2010, APIs and platforms started to emerge, facilitating the data to flow between artefacts, services, brands and facilities. Aesthetics in information visualization and other User experience (UX) aspects become popular and the audience becomes broader. The third wave, in the interval of 2011 and forward, could be described as the maturing wave. People now become fanatic about showing results to others – in sport platforms and on general social media. Further, what symbolizes this wave is that the focus in use becomes more on hi-fi information rather than low-fi data. In the third wave, the usage is widely spread and covers a wide range of requirements from a wide range of users.

The paper gives a more thorough description of the three waves of Sports IT when it comes to applications and user cases. A thorough description of related work for each wave is given with the main goal to pinpoint where research has given fruitful insights and contribution. In order to give a deeper understanding of the waves, one detailed example of a typical digital service of each wave is presented. Finally, the phenomenon of Sports IT and digital wellness is discussed based on findings shown earlier in the paper.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science ; vol 10902
Keywords
Sports IT, Digital wellness, Quantified self, GPS, Digital service design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
computer and systems sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153679 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-91244-8_18 (DOI)978-3-319-91243-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-91244-8 (ISBN)
Conference
HCI International 2018: 20th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Las Vegas, Nevada, July 15-20, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Harr, R. & Wiberg, C. (2016). Sports IT: Digital media and technology for encouraging physical activity. International Journal of Emerging Technology and Innovative Engineering, 2(1), 24-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sports IT: Digital media and technology for encouraging physical activity
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Emerging Technology and Innovative Engineering, ISSN 2394-6598, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 24-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sport IT is an emerging global movement. Many research efforts have addressed the potential of IT for promoting physical activity, a countermeasure against the factors that cause welfare problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. This paper presents an overview of research related to IT and physical activity and identifies three reoccurring themes; 1) Measurement and latforms, 2) Support for opportunistic individual training and finally, 3) Encouragement through Toys and Games. These themes or chategories of Sports IT, are furher explored in a detailed and systematic way. This is wrapped up in a discussion of what could be seen as impotant further research addressing the issues found in this body of research.

Keywords
Sports IT, Physical Activity, Training, Health
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-117131 (URN)
Available from: 2016-02-22 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Rolandsson, V. & Wiberg, C. (2015). The Density of Events Model (DEMO): Exploring density and temporality as key aspects of experiences in events. Journal of Multidisciplinary Engineering Science and Technology, 2(11), 3327-3333
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Density of Events Model (DEMO): Exploring density and temporality as key aspects of experiences in events
2015 (English)In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Engineering Science and Technology, ISSN 3159-0040, Vol. 2, no 11, p. 3327-3333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of IT and digital media changes the notion of experience in relation to events. This paper presents a study of event experiences, and in this case a specific type of events, i.e. academic ceremonies. Based on the results of the study, it is shown that earlier theoretical models does not include the use of IT and digital media in relation to events in order to explain the dimensions found. The Density of Events Model (DEMO) is developed and further explained. Finally, a discussion about usage of the model as well as proposal of future work is made.

Keywords
Experience, User Experience, UX, Events, Event Experience, Ethnography, DEMO
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113920 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-06 Created: 2016-01-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, C. (2015). Transitional states: From extrinsic to intrinsic motivation by using pedagogical tools in learning. In: Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015. Paper presented at E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, Kona, Hawaii, United States, October 19-22, 2015 (pp. 1936-1941). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transitional states: From extrinsic to intrinsic motivation by using pedagogical tools in learning
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015, Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) , 2015, p. 1936-1941Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Motivated students learn much more easily and often teachers make a large effort to motivate them. It is important to get the students to have their own motivation instead from someone else outside, i.e a transition from extrinsic to intrinsic motivation. This transition happens when the student come into transitional states. These are facilitated by, so called, transitional objects, which can be usage of pedagogical tools of different kinds. In this paper we highlight and explain the notion of transitional states and exemplifies some transitional objects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), 2015
Keywords
Instructional Design, Learning Objects
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113919 (URN)978-1-939797-20-9 (ISBN)
Conference
E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, Kona, Hawaii, United States, October 19-22, 2015
Available from: 2016-01-06 Created: 2016-01-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, C. & Nyberg, A. (2012). Innovating social media: five strategies for successful digital entrepreneurship. In: Innovation through Social Media: ISM 2012. Paper presented at Innovation through Social Media, December 3, 2012 Oslo, Norway (pp. 119-126). Trondheim, Norge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovating social media: five strategies for successful digital entrepreneurship
2012 (English)In: Innovation through Social Media: ISM 2012, Trondheim, Norge, 2012, p. 119-126Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the Swedish blogosphere, a high rate of blog readers and writers is woman. It includes some real success stories, where female bloggers are well established, widely known, and successful digital entrepreneurs. The study in this paper included 20 interviews with nine female bloggers, and results show upon five strategies for successful digital entrepreneurship: Out of the closet – from peaceful anonymity to strength to bloom on stage, Understanding the essence of technology – from constraint to transparency, Strategic cooperation between blogging peers, Informal relation management: positive encouragement and mentorship for newcomers, and finally, Becoming friends with your visitors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Trondheim, Norge: , 2012
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113918 (URN)978-82-321-0088-0 (ISBN)
Conference
Innovation through Social Media, December 3, 2012 Oslo, Norway
Available from: 2016-01-06 Created: 2016-01-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Desurvire, H. & Wiberg, C. (2010). User Experience Design for Inexperienced Gamers: GAP - Game Approachability Principles. In: Regina Bernhaupt (Ed.), Evaluating User Experience in Games: Concepts and Methods (pp. 131-147). London: Springer London
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User Experience Design for Inexperienced Gamers: GAP - Game Approachability Principles
2010 (English)In: Evaluating User Experience in Games: Concepts and Methods / [ed] Regina Bernhaupt, London: Springer London, 2010, p. 131-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Game Approachability Principles (GAP) is proposed as a set of useful guidelines for game designers to create better tutorials and first learning levels especially for the casual gamer. Developing better first learning levels can be a key step to ease the casual garner into play proactively - at the conceptual design phase before it is too costly or cumbersome to restructure the tutorials, as would be the case later in the development cycle. Thus, Game Approachability, in the context of game development, is defined as making games initially more friendly, fun, and accessible for those players who have the desire to play, yet do not always follow through to actually playing the game. GAP has evolved through a series of stages assessing accessibility(1) as a stand-alone, heuristic-based approach versus one-on-one usability testing. Outcomes suggest potential for GAP as (I) effective Heuristic Evaluation, (2) adjunct to Usability Testing, and (3) proactive checklist of principles in beginning conceptual and first learning level tutorial design to increase Game Approachability for all levels of garners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Springer London, 2010
Series
Human-Computer Interaction Series, ISSN 1571-5035
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-74587 (URN)10.1007/978-1-84882-963-3_8 (DOI)000278106000008 ()978-1-84882-962-6 (ISBN)978-1-84882-963-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-07-01 Created: 2013-07-01 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Desurvire, H. & Wiberg, C. (2009). Game usability heuristics (PLAY) for evaluating and designing better games: the next iteration. Online Communities and Social Computing, 1(1), 557-566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Game usability heuristics (PLAY) for evaluating and designing better games: the next iteration
2009 (English)In: Online Communities and Social Computing, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 557-566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Game developers have begun applying formal human-computer interaction (HCI) principles in design. Desurvire et al [2] adapted a set of Heuristics for productivity software to games. The resulting set, presented at CHI 2004, was Heuristics to Evaluate Playability (HEP). Generalization of these heuristics is required to make them applicable to a multiple of game genres and game deliveries. This follow-up study focused on the refined list, Heuristics of Playability (PLAY), that can be applied earlier in game development as well as aiding developers between formal usability/playability research during the development cycle. Heuristics were formed based on their efficacious scores on the popular game review website, metacritic.com. Fiftyfour gamers rated High and Low ranked games on 116 potential heuristics. Implications for how these Heuristics will help developers improve game quality are discussed. PLAY has been found useful in design evaluation and elfreport survey format.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin Heidelberg: Springer, 2009
Keywords
Usability, Heuristics, playability, play testing, design guidelines, video games, computer games, games, evaluation, usability, user testing, HCI design principles
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113922 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-06 Created: 2016-01-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Desurivre, H. & Wiberg, C. (2009). Game Usability Heuristics (PLAY) For Evaluating and Designing Better Games: the Next Iteration. In: A Ant Ozok; Panayiotis Zaphiris (Ed.), Online communities and social computing: third international conference, OCSC 2009, held as part of HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, July 19-24, 2009 : proceedings. Paper presented at 13th international conference, HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, July 19-24, 2009 (pp. 557-566). Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Game Usability Heuristics (PLAY) For Evaluating and Designing Better Games: the Next Iteration
2009 (English)In: Online communities and social computing: third international conference, OCSC 2009, held as part of HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, July 19-24, 2009 : proceedings / [ed] A Ant Ozok; Panayiotis Zaphiris, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 557-566Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009
Series
Lecture notes in computer science, ISSN 0302-9743 ; 5621
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
computer and systems sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113990 (URN)9783642027741 (ISBN)3642027741 (ISBN)
Conference
13th international conference, HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, July 19-24, 2009
Available from: 2016-01-10 Created: 2016-01-10 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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