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Storm Mienna, ChristinaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2365-4598
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Axelsson, P. & Storm Mienna, C. (2019). Health and physical wellbeing of the Sámi people. In: Christopher Fleming and Matthew Manning (Ed.), Routledge handbook of indigenous wellbeing: (pp. 13-22). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health and physical wellbeing of the Sámi people
2019 (English)In: Routledge handbook of indigenous wellbeing / [ed] Christopher Fleming and Matthew Manning, Routledge, 2019, p. 13-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter describes the health and physical wellbeing of the Sámi people living in Norway, Sweden, Finland and on the Kola Peninsula in Russia. Drawing on a review of the literature, we note that cancer and cardiovascular diseases are examples of conditions that, hitherto, have been thoroughly studied in the Sámi population in relation to physical wellbeing. Generally, studies conclude that the health and living conditions of the Sámi people are good and close to the level of the non-Indigenous benchmark population. However, it is also obvious that knowledge of the Sámi health situation differs between countries, partly due to national laws and policies that circumscribe opportunities to conduct relevant research involving Sámi communities. To understand the current wellbeing of the Sámi people, it is crucial to understand the effects of colonization. As such, this chapter provides a historical background to the present situation. Finally, the chapter aims to identify future challenges that may affect the wellbeing of the Sámi people of northern Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Health Sciences Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158396 (URN)9781351051262 (ISBN)9781138909175 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-26 Created: 2019-04-26 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Storm Mienna, C., Glas, L., Magnusson, M., Ilgunas, A., Häggman-Henrikson, B. & Wänman, A. (2019). Patients' experiences of supervised jaw-neck exercise among patients with localized TMD pain or TMD pain associated with generalized pain. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' experiences of supervised jaw-neck exercise among patients with localized TMD pain or TMD pain associated with generalized pain
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2019 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients’ experiences of a supervised jaw-neck exercise programme.

Materials and methods: The study used a mixed method design. All patients were diagnosed with myalgia according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD and divided into local myalgia (n = 50; 38 women, mean age 43 yrs, SD 14), and myalgia with generalized pain (n = 28; 27 women, mean age 43 yrs, SD 13). Patients participated in a ten-session supervised exercise programme that included relaxation, coordination and resistance training of the jaw, neck and shoulders. After the 10 sessions an evaluation form was filled out including both open- and closed-ended questions. The quantitative analysis was based on closed-ended questions concerned experience, adaptation and side-effects from the exercise programme. The qualitative analysis was employing inductive content analysis of open-ended questions.

Results: Patients reported similar positive overall experiences of exercise regardless of diagnosis, although more individuals in the general pain group experienced pain during training (57%) compared to the local pain group (26%; p = .015). Patients in both groups shared similar experiences and acknowledged the possibility to participate in an individualized and demanding exercise programme. They expressed feelings of being noticed, taken seriously and respectful care management to be key factors for successful treatment outcome. The exercise programme was acknowledged as a valuable part of treatment.

Conclusion: The hypothesis generated was that individualized and gradually demanding exercise in the rehabilitation process of TMD stimulates self-efficacy and confidence in chronic TMD patients regardless of whether the pain was localized or combined with wide-spread pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Exercise therapy, orofacial pain, pain, qualitative, temporomandibular disorders
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157932 (URN)10.1080/00016357.2019.1598573 (DOI)000465814900001 ()30957601 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-05-28
Storm Mienna, C. & Axelsson, P. (2019). Somatic health in the Indigenous Sami population - a systematic review. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 78(1), Article ID 1638195.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Somatic health in the Indigenous Sami population - a systematic review
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 78, no 1, article id 1638195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this systematic review was to survey the current scientific knowledge regarding the state of somatic health among situation of the Indigenous Sami people in Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Kola Peninsula in Russia; and assess the quality of the identified studies. A systematic search in the databases Pubmed, EBSCOhost (AMED, Medline, Cinahl) and Svemed was conducted from January 2000, through December 2017. This systematic search identified 399 articles. After screening abstracts, 93 articles were reviewed in full text, 32 of which met the inclusion criteria. The scientific quality of the evidence was rated according to the Newcastle–Ottawa scale. Based on the studies with moderate to high scientific quality, there is evidence for stating that the majority of the Sami included in this review experience good health. Mortality and life expectancy are similar, with only minor differences, to those of a non-Sami population. The cancer risk rate among Sami was lower than that of the general population of Norway, Sweden and Finland. Self-reported myocardial infarction prevalence was similar between Sami and non-Sami, but Angina pectoris was more prevalent among Sami. In Sweden, cardiovascular disease rates were similar between Sami and non-Sami. Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common among the Sami population, as are obesity and overweight. To conclude, there are knowledge gaps in regard to the somatic health situation of the Indigenous Sami in the circumpolar area, especially in Russia, Finland and Sweden; as current knowledge is mainly based on publications from the SAMINOR study in Norway. No study obtained the highest quality score, suggesting a need to implement longitudinal prospective studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Indigenous, Sami, health, systematic review, Newcastle-Ottawa scale
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Epidemiology; Public health; Population studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161416 (URN)10.1080/22423982.2019.1638195 (DOI)000473525200001 ()3126224131262241 (PubMedID)
Funder
Wallenberg Foundations, 2012.0222
Available from: 2019-07-06 Created: 2019-07-06 Last updated: 2019-07-25Bibliographically approved
Marklund, S., Storm Mienna, C., Wahlström, J., Englund, E. & Wiesinger, B. (2019). Work ability and productivity among dentists: associations with musculoskeletal pain, stress, and sleep. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work ability and productivity among dentists: associations with musculoskeletal pain, stress, and sleep
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Work ability can be measured by the work ability index (WAI), and work-related questions measuring productivity loss in terms of quality and quantity of work. Dentists have high occupational risk of musculoskeletal pain and the exposure of ergonomic strain is already high during dental education. The aim was to evaluate work ability and productivity among dentists, and to identify gender differences and associations with sleep, stress, and reported frequent pain.

Methods: The study population comprised 187 dentists (123 women and 64 men) who had been working as dentists between 5 and 12 years. Participants completed a questionnaire regarding sleep, stress, presence of pain at different sites, work ability assessed by WAI, and productivity in terms of quality and quantity of work.

Results: Poor sleep quality and high level of stress were reported by 31% and 48.1% of participants, respectively, with no gender differences and no association with age. The prevalence of frequent pain ranged 6.4–46.5% with shoulders being the most prevalent site. Thirty-three percent reported reduced work ability. Poor sleep, high amount of stress, and multi-site pain were associated with decreased work ability.

Conclusions: A high prevalence of pain was shown among dentists. Decreased work ability in terms of productivity loss was associated with poor sleep quality, high amount of stress, and multi-site pain. Preventive actions at the workplace should promote good musculoskeletal health, and measures taken, both individual and organizational, to minimize the risk of high, persistent stress and work-related pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Dentist, Pain, Productivity, Sleep, Stress, Work ability
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164959 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01478-5 (DOI)000492568400001 ()31654126 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-19
Madden, R., Axelsson, P., Kukutai, T., Griffiths, K., Storm Mienna, C., Brown, N., . . . Ring, I. (2016). Statistics on Indigenous Peoples: International effort needed. Statistical Journal of the IAOS, 32(1), 37-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Statistics on Indigenous Peoples: International effort needed
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2016 (English)In: Statistical Journal of the IAOS, ISSN 1874-7655, E-ISSN 1875-9254, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 37-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2007, the UN General Assembly endorsed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. In the following years, there has been a strong call from a range United Nations agencies and spokespersons for countries to act to improve their statistics relating to Indigenous peoples as part of their response to the Declaration. These calls have emphasised the need for a holistic approach, describing strengths and resilience of Indigenous peoples and not just a focus on gaps and disadvantage. National responses have been mixed and overall statistics remain inadequate. Significantly, there has been no international statistical effort through the United Nations statistical structures to respond to the Declaration and the increasing array of calls for improved statistics. The United Nations Statistical Commission in particular has an array of mechanisms to study statistical needs and develop solutions across a broad international statistical agenda. It is time for countries to make a concerted effort to improve their own statistics on Indigenous peoples, and to insist that the Statistical Commission work in partnership with the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and other stakeholders to lead a major international drive to improve statistics on and for Indigenous peoples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2016
Keywords
Indigenous research, statistics, demography, United Nations
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Statistics; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-116853 (URN)10.3233/SJI-160975 (DOI)
Projects
Indigenous health and Colonization
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, WAFSwedish Research Council, 2012-5490
Note

The foundation of this paper originates from discussions at the international workshop "Colonisation, Indigenous health and History" held 15-17 June 2015 at the The Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities.

Available from: 2016-02-14 Created: 2016-02-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Allard, C., Axelsson, P., Brännlund, I., Cocq, C., Hjortfors, L.-M., Jacobsson, L., . . . Össbo, Å. (2015). Rasbiologiskt språkbruk i statens rättsprocess mot sameby. Dagens Nyheter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rasbiologiskt språkbruk i statens rättsprocess mot sameby
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2015 (Swedish)In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Statens hantering av forskningsresultat i rättsprocessen med Girjas sameby utgör ett hot mot Sverige som rättsstat och kunskapsnation. Åratal av svensk och internationell forskning underkänns och man använder ett språkbruk som skulle kunna vara hämtat från rasbiologins tid. Nu måste staten ta sitt ansvar och börja agera som en demokratisk rättsstat, skriver 59 forskare.

Keywords
girjas, samer, rasbiologi, urfolk, diskriminering
National Category
History Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111276 (URN)
Note

Publicerad: 2015-06-11

Available from: 2015-11-11 Created: 2015-11-11 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Storm Mienna, C., Johansson, E. E. & Wänman, A. (2014). "Grin(d) and bear it": narratives from Sami women with and without temporomandibular disorders. A qualitative study.. Journal of oral & facial pain and headache, 28(3), 243-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Grin(d) and bear it": narratives from Sami women with and without temporomandibular disorders. A qualitative study.
2014 (English)In: Journal of oral & facial pain and headache, ISSN 2333-0384, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 243-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To explore thoughts, experiences, and beliefs regarding temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among Sami women with and without TMD in order to gain insights into their health care experiences and to generate a hypothesis regarding factors associated with long-standing TMD.

METHODS: Qualitative thematic interviews were conducted with a strategic sample of 17 Sami women, of whom 10 had a TMD diagnosis according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD and 7 age-matched women who had no signs or symptoms of TMD. Their ages were between 23 and 58 years. The thematic interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed based on Grounded Theory, a qualitative methodology aiming to generate hypotheses grounded in the gathered data.

RESULTS: The core category that evolved was "Grin(d) and bear it," which summarizes the Sami participants' various ways and stages of processing and handling the interacting categories (triggers, strains, distrust, and reconciliation with pain and/or difficulties in life). They described divergent as well as similar understandings of triggering factors. Maintaining factors were described as mental-physical strain and stress, and also a jaw-clenching behavior. Women without TMD contributed with factors that helped them to handle strains, reconcile, and stay healthy. They relied on strong social support.

CONCLUSION: Based on the analysis, the following hypothesis was generated: Women with TMD, associated headaches, and neck-shoulder pain may benefit from efforts aimed at empowering them to use their own abilities to reduce stress behavior, strain, and disuse of the jaw. Rehabilitation strategies in groups might increase their sense of coherence and increase social support, which seems to be more limited than in women with no symptoms of TMD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence publishing, 2014
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91788 (URN)000340227800006 ()25068218 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-15 Created: 2014-08-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Storm Mienna, C. (2014). Temporomandibular disorders among Sami women: perspectives based on an epidemiological survey with mixed methods. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporomandibular disorders among Sami women: perspectives based on an epidemiological survey with mixed methods
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction The aim of the research project was to examine prevalence, co-morbidity, and impact on daily life of pain and dysfunction in the jaw-face, head, and neck-shoulder regions among adult Sami women in northern Sweden. The aim of the qualitative part of the study was to explore, thoughts, experiences, and beliefs regarding temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among Sami women with and without TMD, to gain insights into their health care experiences.

Methods The research project used a mixed methods approach including questionnaire analysis, a case-control study, and thematic interviews. The study population (Papers I and III) included 487 women living in the Arctic region of northern Sweden and enrolled in the register of the Swedish Sami Parliament or registered as reindeer owners or reindeer herders in the Swedish Board of Agriculture. Two years after the questionnaire study, 22 women (cases) with longstanding, intense, and frequent symptoms indicative of TMD, together with 46 age-matched women (controls) without any symptoms in the jaw–face region, underwent a clinical examination of the function of the temporomandibular joint, jaw- and neck muscles, mandibular mobility, and dental occlusion. The examiner was blind to the women’s affiliation (Paper II). Thematic interviews with a strategic subsample of 17 Sami women (Paper IV) were thereafter conducted and analyzed with a grounded theory approach.

Results The prevalence of frequent symptoms indicative of TMD was 17%, of headaches 19%, and of neck-shoulder pain (NSP) 30%. Seventeen percent reported that their TMD affected daily life. Duration of jaw pain, troublesome impaired jaw opening, and neck pain, together with a low education level, affected the statement of whether TMD influenced daily life or not. Factors related to pain had the greatest influence when these Sami women rated the related impairment. There was a statistically significant relationship between TMD, frequent headaches, and frequent NSP (P <0.0001). Longstanding, intense, and frequent symptoms indicative of TMD remained essentially unchanged over the two-year follow-up period. Cases reported impaired general health and awareness of clenching teeth significantly more frequently than did controls. Variations in dental occlusion did not distinguish cases from controls. In the qualitative part of the project the core category, “Grin(d) and bear it,” summarizes the participants’ various ways and stages of processing and handling the interacting categories: (1) triggers, (2) strains, (3) distrust, and (4) reconciliation with pain and/or difficulties in life. Perpetuating factors were described as mental-physical strain and stress, and also a tooth clenching behavior. Women without TMD expressed factors that helped them to handle strains, reconcile, and stay healthy. They relied on helpful social support.

Conclusion Disabling TMD, headaches, and NSP are common in Sami women. Women with TMD commonly expressed that tooth clenching was a familiar habit related to strains in life; they described an impaired general state of health and distrust in the care providers’ competence and ability to manage their problems. Women without TMD expressed confidence in their self-efficacy and were generally less concerned with strains in their lives. Rehabilitation strategies aiming at empowerment and improved self-efficacy may be a successful approach in women with disabling TMD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2014. p. 83
Series
Umeå University odontological dissertations, ISSN 0345-7532 ; 133
Keywords
epidemiology, gender, headache, indigenous, pain, qualitative, quality of life, temporomandibular
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92696 (URN)978-91-7601-121-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-10-03, Sal B, byggnad 1D, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-09-12 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Storm Mienna, C. & Wänman, A. (2012). Self-reported impact on daily life activities related to temporomandibular disorders, headaches, and neck-shoulder pain among women in a Sami population living in Northern Sweden. Journal of Orofacial Pain, 26(3), 215-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported impact on daily life activities related to temporomandibular disorders, headaches, and neck-shoulder pain among women in a Sami population living in Northern Sweden
2012 (English)In: Journal of Orofacial Pain, ISSN 1064-6655, E-ISSN 1945-3396, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 215-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To analyze the influence of frequency, intensity, and duration of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), headaches, and neck-shoulder pain (NSP) on Sami women's daily life. A further aim was to analyze the relationship between these symptoms and age.

Methods: All 751 Sami women 21 to 70 years old registered in either the Swedish Sami Parliament's electoral register or registered as reindeer owners or herders and living north of the Arctic Circle in Sweden were sent a questionnaire regarding TMD symptoms, NSP, and headaches. In total, 487 women (65%) participated. The questionnaire focused on symptom frequency, duration, and intensity and whether these symptoms influenced activities of daily life. The symptom's interference with daily life activities was measured, respectively, with a numerical rating scale (NRS). The statistical analyses included multiple logistic regression analysis and Chi-square test. A P value < .05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: Seventeen percent of the women reported that symptoms in the jaw-face region to some degree disturbed their daily life, and for 6%, the interference was significant (>= 5 on NRS). Duration of jaw pain, troublesome impaired jaw opening, and neck pain, together with a low education level, affected reports of whether symptoms of TMD influenced daily life. Almost half of the study population reported that headaches had a negative impact on their life. A similar pattern was reported for NSP. The prevalence of frequent and troublesome symptoms of TMD and headaches, but not NSP, showed a declining trend with age.

Conclusion: TMD symptoms, headaches, and NSP negatively influence many Sami women's daily life. Factors related to pain had the greatest influence when these Sami women rated the related impairment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hanover Park, IL: Quintessence Publishing, 2012
Keywords
headache, oral health, pain, quality of life, temporomandibular disorders
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-58163 (URN)000306938800008 ()
Available from: 2012-08-28 Created: 2012-08-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Storm Mienna, C. & Wänman, A. (2007). A two-year follow-up study of temporomandibular disorders in a female Sami population: validation of cases and controls as predicted by questionnaire. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 65(6), 341-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A two-year follow-up study of temporomandibular disorders in a female Sami population: validation of cases and controls as predicted by questionnaire
2007 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 341-347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The first aim of this study was to validate persistent, severe symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) among Sami females, as predicted by questionnaire. The second aim was to establish diagnoses according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis 1 among predicted cases and controls. The third aim was to compare subjects with severe TMD to controls in regard to dental occlusion, general health, and parafunctions.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The subjects, Sami females living in the Arctic region of northern Sweden, all with long-standing (>or=1 year), intense (>or=5 on NS), and frequent (>or=once a week) symptoms of pain and dysfunction in the jaw-face region, were invited for clinical examination; 22 (63%) agreed to participate. Forty-six subjects with no symptoms in the jaw-face region were matched to these cases in accordance with five age groups. The examiner was blind to subject affiliation.

RESULTS: The positive predictive value of presenting with signs and symptoms of TMD at follow-up was 0.82; the negative value was 0.87. Cases reported impaired general health and awareness of parafunctions significantly more frequently than did controls. Registered dental occlusion factors did not distinguish cases from controls.

CONCLUSIONS: Long-standing, intense, and frequent TMD symptoms remained essentially unchanged over the 2-year follow-up of females in a Sami population. Presence of severe TMD was related to impaired general health and awareness of oral parafunctions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2007
Keywords
Females, pain, prospective, Sami, temporomandibular
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-20919 (URN)10.1080/00016350701742356 (DOI)000251547900006 ()18071955 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-30 Created: 2009-03-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2365-4598

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