umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Lif Holgerson, PernillaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2779-5865
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Eriksson, L., Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries. Nutrients, 11(7), Article ID 1491.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taste and diet preferences are complex and influenced by both environmental and host traits while affecting both food selection and associated health outcomes. The present study genotyped 94 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in previously reported taste and food intake related genes and assessed associations with taste threshold (TT) and preferred intensity (PT) of sweet, sour and bitter, food preferences, habitual diet intake, and caries status in healthy young Swedish men and women (n = 127). Polymorphisms in the GNAT3, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes were associated with variation in TT and PT for sweet taste as well as sweet food intake. Increasing PT for sweet was associated with increasing preference and intake of sugary foods. Similarly, increasing TT for sour was associated with increasing intake of sour foods, whereas the associations between food preference/intake and TT/PT for bitter was weak in this study group. Finally, allelic variation in the GNAT3, SLC2A2, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes was associated with caries status, whereas TT, PT and food preferences were not. It was concluded that variations in taste receptor, glucose transporter and gustducin encoding genes are related to taste perception, food preference and intake as well as the sugar-dependent caries disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
taste perception, taste preference, taste genes, diet preference, diet selection, caries
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162681 (URN)10.3390/nu11071491 (DOI)000478885400090 ()31261961 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Mullee, A., Romaguera, D., Pearson-Stuttard, J., Viallon, V., Stepien, M., Freisling, H., . . . Murphy, N. (2019). Association Between Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries. JAMA Internal Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association Between Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries
Show others...
2019 (English)In: JAMA Internal Medicine, ISSN 2168-6106, E-ISSN 2168-6114Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Importance: Soft drinks are frequently consumed, but whether this consumption is associated with mortality risk is unknown and has been understudied in European populations to date.

Objective: To examine the association between total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink consumption and subsequent total and cause-specific mortality.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study involved participants (n = 451 743 of the full cohort) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), an ongoing, large multinational cohort of people from 10 European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom), with participants recruited between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2000. Excluded participants were those who reported cancer, heart disease, stroke, or diabetes at baseline; those with implausible dietary intake data; and those with missing soft drink consumption or follow-up information. Data analyses were performed from February 1, 2018, to October 1, 2018.

Exposure: Consumption of total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Total mortality and cause-specific mortality. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for other mortality risk factors.

Results: In total, 521 330 individuals were enrolled. Of this total, 451 743 (86.7%) were included in the study, with a mean (SD) age of 50.8 (9.8) years and with 321 081 women (71.1%). During a mean (range) follow-up of 16.4 (11.1 in Greece to 19.2 in France) years, 41 693 deaths occurred. Higher all-cause mortality was found among participants who consumed 2 or more glasses per day (vs consumers of <1 glass per month) of total soft drinks (hazard ratio [HR], 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11-1.22; P < .001), sugar-sweetened soft drinks (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P = .004), and artificially sweetened soft drinks (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16-1.35; P < .001). Positive associations were also observed between artificially sweetened soft drinks and deaths from circulatory diseases (≥2 glasses per day vs <1 glass per month; HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.30-1.78; P < .001) and between sugar-sweetened soft drinks and deaths from digestive diseases (≥1 glass per day vs <1 glass per month; HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.24-2.05; P < .001).

Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that consumption of total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks was positively associated with all-cause deaths in this large European cohort; the results are supportive of public health campaigns aimed at limiting the consumption of soft drinks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association (AMA), 2019
National Category
Dentistry Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164265 (URN)10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2478 (DOI)31479109 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071732581 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-19 Created: 2019-10-19 Last updated: 2019-10-22
Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Brunius, C., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Carbonic Anhydrase 6 Gene Variation influences Oral Microbiota Composition and Caries Risk in Swedish adolescents. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 452.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbonic Anhydrase 6 Gene Variation influences Oral Microbiota Composition and Caries Risk in Swedish adolescents
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbonic anhydrase VI (CA6) catalyses the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in saliva with possible pH regulation, taste perception, and tooth formation effects. This study assessed effects of variation in the CA6 gene on oral microbiota and specifically the acidophilic and caries-associated Streptococcus mutans in 17-year old Swedish adolescents (n = 154). Associations with caries status and secreted CA6 protein were also evaluated. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (27 SNPs in 5 haploblocks) and saliva and tooth biofilm microbiota from Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA (V3-V4) sequencing and culturing were analysed. Haploblock 4 (rs10864376, rs3737665, rs12138897) CCC associated with low prevalence of S. mutans (OR (95% CI): 0.5 (0.3, 0.8)), and caries (OR 0.6 (0.3, 0.9)), whereas haploblock 4 TTG associated with high prevalence of S. mutans (OR: 2.7 (1.2, 5.9)) and caries (OR: 2.3 (1.2, 4.4)). The TTG-haploblock 4 (represented by rs12138897(G)) was characterized by S. mutans, Scardovia wiggsiae, Treponema sp. HOT268, Tannerella sp. HOT286, Veillonella gp.1 compared with the CCC-haploblock 4 (represented by rs12138897(C)). Secreted CA6 in saliva was weakly linked to CA6 gene variation. In conclusion, the results indicate that CA6 gene polymorphisms influence S. mutans colonization, tooth biofilm microbiota composition and risk of dental caries in Swedish adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155838 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-36832-z (DOI)000456553400018 ()30679524 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L., Lif Holgerson, P., Esberg, A. & Johansson, I. (2018). Microbial complexes and caries in 17-year-olds with and without Streptococcus mutans. Journal of Dental Research, 97(3), 275-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial complexes and caries in 17-year-olds with and without Streptococcus mutans
2018 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streptococcus mutans is a key bacterial species in the caries process, which affects >90% of the population worldwide. However, other acidogenic and aciduric/acidophilic species may contribute to disease development. In Sweden, a country with low prevalences of caries and S. mutans, a significant portion of caries-affected adolescents lack detectable levels of S. mutans. The objectives of the present study were 1) to characterize the tooth biofilm and saliva microbiota of adolescents with caries disease, with or without detectable S. mutans, from tooth biofilm and saliva samples and 2) to assess taxa clustering in the tooth biofilm and saliva samples and relate this information to caries status. For 17-y-old participants ( N = 154), enamel and dentin caries (the total number of present carious surfaces in the enamel and dentin) and caries experience (the number of decayed and filled tooth surfaces) were recorded, dental biofilm and saliva samples obtained, and information on medical and lifestyle habits collected. Multiplex 16S rDNA (V3-V4) sequencing of bacterial DNA was performed with the Illumina MiSeq platform. The Human Oral Microbiome Database and the ProbeSeq pipeline were used in the HOMI NGS procedure. In subjects with caries experience, high levels of S. mutans were associated with a few species and low levels with a panel of saccharolytic species. Present caries was similarly associated with a panel of saccharolytic species in subjects without S. mutans. Furthermore, tooth biofilm microbiota could be used to establish 4 clusters of subjects with different caries experiences. In particular, high levels of S. mutans were associated with the presence of a few influential species in multivariate modeling, including Scardovia wiggsiae. By contrast, a panel of less avid lactic acid-producing species was influential in patients with undetectable or low S. mutans levels in such modeling. These findings support a prominent role of S. mutans in infected adolescents but also the ecologic concept, especially in S. mutans-free subjects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand oaks: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
microbiota, saliva, tooth biofilm, adolescents, 16S, high-throughput nucleotide sequencing
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139760 (URN)10.1177/0022034517731758 (DOI)000429319800005 ()28930642 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Eriksson, L., Haworth, S. & Lif Holgerson, P. (2018). Self-reported bovine milk intake is associated with oral microbiota composition. PLoS ONE, 13(3), Article ID e0193504.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported bovine milk intake is associated with oral microbiota composition
Show others...
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0193504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bovine milk intake has been associated with various disease outcomes, with modulation of the gastro-intestinal microbiome being suggested as one potential mechanism. The aim of the present study was to explore the oral microbiota in relation to variation in self-reported milk intake. Saliva and tooth biofilm microbiota was characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and cultivation in 154 Swedish adolescents, and information on diet and other lifestyle markers were obtained from a questionnaire, and dental caries from clinical examination. A replication cohort of 31,571 adults with similar information on diet intake, other lifestyle markers and caries was also studied. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) modelling separated adolescents with low milk intake (lowest tertile with <0.4 servings/day) apart from those with high intake of milk (≥3.7 servings/day) based on saliva and tooth biofilm, respectively. Taxa in several genera contributed to this separation, and milk intake was inversely associated with the caries causing Streptococcus mutans in saliva and tooth biofilm samples by sequencing, PCR and cultivation. Despite the difference in S. mutans colonization, caries prevalence did not differ between milk consumption groups in the adolescents or the adults in the replication cohort, which may reflect that a significant positive association between intake of milk and sweet products was present in both the study and replication group. It was concluded that high milk intake correlates with different oral microbiota and it is hypothesized that milk may confer similar effects in the gut. The study also illustrated that reduction of one single disease associated bacterial species, such as S. mutans by milk intake, may modulate but not prevent development of complex diseases, such as caries, due to adverse effects from other causal factors, such as sugar intake in the present study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Fransisco: Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018
Keywords
saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, dairy products, streptococcus mutans, dental caries, cardiovascular disease, lactase persistence, in vitro, health, cancer, mortality
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146286 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0193504 (DOI)000427931600019 ()29561863 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gyll, J., Ridell, K., Öhlund, I., Akeson, P. K., Johansson, I. & Lif Holgerson, P. (2018). Vitamin D status and dental caries in healthy Swedish children. Nutrition Journal, 17, Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vitamin D status and dental caries in healthy Swedish children
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 17, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Vitamin D is crucial for mineralized tissue formation and immunological functions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between vitamin D status and dental status in healthy children with vitamin D supplementation in infancy and at 6 years of age.

Method: Eight-year-old children who had participated, in a vitamin D intervention project when they were 6 years old were invited to participate in a dental follow-up study. They had fair or darker skin complexion and represented two geographically distant parts of Sweden. 25-hydroxy vitamin D in serum had been measured at 6 years of age and after a 3-month intervention with 25, 10 or 2 (placebo) mu g of vitamin D-3 per day. Two years later, caries and enamel defects were scored, self-reported information on e.g., oral behavior, dietary habits and intake of vitamin D supplements was collected, and innate immunity peptide LL37 levels in saliva and cariogenic mutant streptococci in tooth biofilm were analyzed. The outcome variables were caries and tooth enamel defects.

Results: Dental status was evaluated in 85 of the 206 children in the basic intervention study. Low vitamin D levels were found in 28% at baseline compared to 11% after the intervention, and 34% reported continued intake of vitamin D supplements. Logistic regression supported a weak inverse association between vitamin D status at 6 years of age and caries 2 years later (odds ratio 0.96; p = 0.024) with minor attenuation after an adjustment for potential confounders. Multivariate projection regression confirmed that insufficient vitamin D levels correlated with caries and higher vitamin D levels correlated with being caries-free. Vitamin D status at 6 years of age was unrelated to enamel defects but was positively associated with saliva LL37 levels.

Conclusion: An association between vitamin D status and caries was supported, but it was not completely consistent. Vitamin D status at 6 years of age was unrelated to enamel defects but was positively associated with LL37 expression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Vitamin D, Children, caries, enamel defects, LL37
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144348 (URN)10.1186/s12937-018-0318-1 (DOI)000419960300001 ()29338758 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Figueira, J., Gouveia-Figueira, S., Öhman, C., Lif Holgerson, P., Nording, M. L. & Öhman, A. (2017). Metabolite quantification by NMR and LC-MS/MS reveals differences between unstimulated, stimulated, and pure parotid saliva. Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, 140, 295-300, Article ID S0731-7085(16)31308-5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabolite quantification by NMR and LC-MS/MS reveals differences between unstimulated, stimulated, and pure parotid saliva
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, ISSN 0731-7085, E-ISSN 1873-264X, Vol. 140, p. 295-300, article id S0731-7085(16)31308-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Saliva is a readily available biofluid that is sensitive to metabolic changes and can be collected through rapid and non-invasive collection procedures, and it shows great promise for clinical metabolomic studies. This work studied the metabolite composition of, and the differences between, saliva samples collected by unstimulated spitting/drooling, paraffin chewing-stimulated spitting, and parotid gland suction using targeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for metabolite quantification. As applied here, these two analytical techniques provide complementary metabolite information and together extend the metabolome coverage with robust NMR quantification of soluble metabolites and sensitive targeted LC-MS/MS analysis of bioactive lipids in specific metabolic pathways. The NMR analysis was performed on ultrafiltrated (3kDa cutoff) saliva samples and resulted in a total of 45 quantified metabolites. The LC-MS/MS analysis was performed on both filtered and unfiltered samples and resulted in the quantification of two endocannabinoids (AEA and PEA) and 22 oxylipins, which at present is the most comprehensive targeted analysis of bioactive lipids in human saliva. Important differences in the metabolite composition were observed between the three saliva sample collection methods, which should be taken into consideration when designing metabolomic studies of saliva. Furthermore, the combined use of the two metabolomics platforms (NMR and LC-MS/MS) proved to be viable for research and clinical studies of the salivary metabolome.

Keywords
Eicosanoids, Endocannabinoids, LC-MS/MS, NMR, Oxylipins, Saliva
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134056 (URN)10.1016/j.jpba.2017.03.037 (DOI)000402850500036 ()28380387 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Timby, N., Domellöf, M., Lif Holgerson, P., West, C. E., Lonnerdal, B., Hernell, O. & Johansson, I. (2017). Oral Microbiota in Infants Fed a Formula Supplemented with Bovine Milk Fat Globule Membranes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. PLoS ONE, 12(1), Article ID e0169831.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral Microbiota in Infants Fed a Formula Supplemented with Bovine Milk Fat Globule Membranes: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Show others...
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e0169831Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background In a recent study, supplementation of infant formula with milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) decreased the incidence of otitis media in infants <6 months of age. Objectives The aim of the present study was to characterize the oral microbiota in infants fed MFGM-supplemented formula and compare it to that of infants fed standard formula or breast milk.

Methods In a prospective double-blinded randomized controlled trial, exclusively formula-fed infants <2 months of age were randomized to be fed experimental formula (EF, n = 80) with reduced energy and protein and supplemented with a bovine MFGM concentrate, or standard formula (SF, n = 80) until 6 months of age. A breast-fed reference (BFR, n = 80) group was also recruited. The oral microbiota was analyzed at 4 (n = 124) and 12 (n = 166) months of age using Illumina MiSeq multiplex sequencing and taxonomic resolution against the HOMD 16S rDNA database of oral bacteria.

Results Species richness in the oral samples did not differ between the EF and SF groups, but partial least square modeling identified a few taxa that were significantly associated with being in either group, e.g. lower level of Moraxella catarrhalis in the EF group. Infants in the BFR group had significantly lower species richness at 4 months of age and their microbiota pattern differed markedly from the formula-fed groups.

Conclusions Supplementation of infant formula with MFGM yielded moderate effects on the oral micro biome. Moraxella catarrhalis was less prevalent in infants fed EF than in those fed SF and may be associated with the decrease in otitis media seen in the same group.

National Category
Pediatrics Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131641 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0169831 (DOI)000392380100035 ()28099499 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-01 Created: 2017-03-01 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L., Holgerson, P. L. & Johansson, I. (2017). Saliva and tooth biofilm bacterial microbiota in adolescents in a low caries community. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 5861.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Saliva and tooth biofilm bacterial microbiota in adolescents in a low caries community
2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 5861Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oral cavity harbours a complex microbiome that is linked to dental diseases and serves as a route to other parts of the body. Here, the aims were to characterize the oral microbiota by deep sequencing in a low-caries population with regular dental care since childhood and search for association with caries prevalence and incidence. Saliva and tooth biofilm from 17-year-olds and mock bacteria communities were analysed using 16S rDNA Illumina MiSeq (v3-v4) and PacBio SMRT (v1-v8) sequencing including validity and reliability estimates. Caries was scored at 17 and 19 years of age. Both sequencing platforms revealed that Firmicutes dominated in the saliva, whereas Firmicutes and Actinobacteria abundances were similar in tooth biofilm. Saliva microbiota discriminated caries-affected from caries-free adolescents, with enumeration of Scardovia wiggsiae, Streptococcus mutans, Bifidobacterium longum, Leptotrichia sp. HOT498, and Selenomonas spp. in caries-affected participants. Adolescents with B. longum in saliva had significantly higher 2-year caries increment. PacBio SMRT revealed Corynebacterium matruchotii as the most prevalent species in tooth biofilm. In conclusion, both sequencing methods were reliable and valid for oral samples, and saliva microbiota was associated with cross-sectional caries prevalence, especially S. wiggsiae, S. mutans, and B. longum; the latter also with the 2-year caries incidence.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138030 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-06221-z (DOI)000405895000013 ()
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Witkowska, E., Kaveh, B., Lif Holgerson, P. & Tanner, A. C. (2016). The Microbiome in Populations with a Low and High Prevalence of Caries. Journal of Dental Research, 95(1), 80-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Microbiome in Populations with a Low and High Prevalence of Caries
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The oral microbiota was compared between Romanian adolescents with a high prevalence of caries and no dental care and Swedish caries-active and caries-free adolescents in caries prevention programs and with a low prevalence of caries. Biofilm samples were analyzed by FLX+ pyrosequencing of the V1 to V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/quantitative PCR (qPCR) for Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Sequences obtained blasted to 9 phyla, 66 genera, and 401 human oral taxa (HOT) in the 16S rRNA Human Oral Microbiome Database, of which 295 were represented by >= 20 sequences. The Romanian adolescents had more sequences in Firmicutes and fewer in Actinobacteria phyla and more sequences in the genera Bacteroidetes [G-3], Porphyromonas, Abiotrophia, Filifactor, Peptostreptococcaceae [11][G-4], Pseudoramibacter, Streptococcus, and Neisseria and fewer in Actinomyces, Selenomonas, Veillonella, Campylobacter, and TM7 [G-1] than the Swedish groups. Multivariate modeling employing HOT, S. sobrinus and S. mutans (PCR/qPCR), and sugar snacks separated Romanian from Swedish adolescents. The Romanian adolescents' microbiota was characterized by a panel of streptococci, including S. mutans, S. sobrinus, and Streptococcus australis, and Alloprevotella, Leptotrichia, Neisseria, Porphyromonas, and Prevotella. The Swedish adolescents were characterized by sweet snacks, and those with caries activity were also characterized by Prevotella, Actinomyces, and Capnocytophaga species and those free of caries by Actinomyces, Prevotella, Selenomonas, Streptococcus, and Mycoplasma. Eight species including Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus species HOT070 were prevalent in Romanian and Swedish caries-active subjects but not caries-free subjects. In conclusion, S. mutans and S. sobrinus correlated with Romanian adolescents with caries and with limited access to dental care, whereas S. mutans and S. sobrinus were detected infrequently in Swedish adolescents in dental care programs. Swedish caries-active adolescents were typically colonized by Actinomyces, Selenomonas, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga. Hence, the role of mutans streptococci as a primary caries pathogen appears less pronounced in populations with prevention programs compared to populations lacking caries treatment and prevention strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
oral microbiota, pyrosequencing, adolescents, Sweden, Romania, mutans streptococci
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114611 (URN)10.1177/0022034515609554 (DOI)000367103000012 ()26442950 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-11 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2779-5865

Search in DiVA

Show all publications