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Lif Holgerson, PernillaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2779-5865
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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Haworth, S., Esberg, A., Lif Holgerson, P., Kuja-Halkola, R., Timpson, N. J., Magnusson, P. K., . . . Johansson, I. (2020). Heritability of Caries Scores, Trajectories, and Disease Subtypes. Journal of Dental Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heritability of Caries Scores, Trajectories, and Disease Subtypes
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Previous studies report that dental caries is partially heritable, but there is uncertainty in the magnitude of genetic effects and little understanding of how genetic factors might influence caries progression or caries subtypes. This study aimed to estimate the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors in the etiology of different caries outcomes using a twin-based design. Analysis included up to 41,678 twins in the Swedish Twin Register aged 7 to 97 y, and dental data were obtained from preexisting dental records. The outcome measures were 1) summary indices of caries experience, 2) parameters representing trajectory in caries progression derived from longitudinal modeling, and 3) caries scores in groups of biologically similar tooth surfaces derived from hierarchical clustering of tooth surfaces (termed caries clusters). Additive genetic factors explained between 49.1% and 62.7% of variation in caries scores and between 50.0% and 60.5% of variation in caries trajectories. Seven caries clusters were identified, which had estimates of heritability lying between 41.9% and 54.3%. Shared environmental factors were important for only some of these clusters and explained 16% of variation in fissure caries in molar teeth but little variation in other clusters of caries presentation. The genetic factors influencing these clusters were only partially overlapping, suggesting that different biological processes are important in different groups of tooth surfaces and that innate liability to some patterns of caries presentation may partially explain why groups of tooth surfaces form clusters within the mouth. These results provide 1) improved quantification of genetic factors in the etiology of caries and 2) new data about the role of genetics in terms of longitudinal changes in caries status and specific patterns of disease presentation, and they may help lay the foundations for personalized interventions in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
twins, longitudinal, genetics, cluster analysis, dental caries susceptibility, epidemiology
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167627 (URN)10.1177/0022034519897910 (DOI)000507732700001 ()31905308 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077525234 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-05 Created: 2020-02-05 Last updated: 2020-03-09
Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Hasslöf, P., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2020). Oral Microbiota Profile Associates with Sugar Intake and Taste Preference Genes. Nutrients, 12(3), Article ID 681.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral Microbiota Profile Associates with Sugar Intake and Taste Preference Genes
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2020 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 681Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Oral microbiota ecology is influenced by environmental and host conditions, but few studies have evaluated associations between untargeted measures of the entire oral microbiome and potentially relevant environmental and host factors. This study aimed to identify salivary microbiota cluster groups using hierarchical cluster analyses (Wards method) based on 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, and identify lifestyle and host factors which were associated with these groups. Group members (n = 175) were distinctly separated by microbiota profiles and differed in reported sucrose intake and allelic variation in the taste-preference-associated genes TAS1R1 (rs731024) and GNAT3 (rs2074673). Groups with higher sucrose intake were either characterized by a wide panel of species or phylotypes with fewer aciduric species, or by a narrower profile that included documented aciduric- and caries-associated species. The inferred functional profiles of the latter type were dominated by metabolic pathways associated with the carbohydrate metabolism with enrichment of glycosidase functions. In conclusion, this study supported in vivo associations between sugar intake and oral microbiota ecology, but it also found evidence for a variable microbiota response to sugar, highlighting the importance of modifying host factors and microbes beyond the commonly targeted acidogenic and acid-tolerant species. The results should be confirmed under controlled settings with comprehensive phenotypic and genotypic data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
16S rDNA sequencing, genes, microbiota, saliva, sugar, taste
National Category
Dentistry Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168730 (URN)10.3390/nu12030681 (DOI)32138214 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-09 Created: 2020-03-09 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L., Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries. Nutrients, 11(7), Article ID 1491.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allelic Variation in Taste Genes Is Associated with Taste and Diet Preferences and Dental Caries
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2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 1491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taste and diet preferences are complex and influenced by both environmental and host traits while affecting both food selection and associated health outcomes. The present study genotyped 94 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in previously reported taste and food intake related genes and assessed associations with taste threshold (TT) and preferred intensity (PT) of sweet, sour and bitter, food preferences, habitual diet intake, and caries status in healthy young Swedish men and women (n = 127). Polymorphisms in the GNAT3, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes were associated with variation in TT and PT for sweet taste as well as sweet food intake. Increasing PT for sweet was associated with increasing preference and intake of sugary foods. Similarly, increasing TT for sour was associated with increasing intake of sour foods, whereas the associations between food preference/intake and TT/PT for bitter was weak in this study group. Finally, allelic variation in the GNAT3, SLC2A2, SLC2A4, TAS1R1 and TAS1R2 genes was associated with caries status, whereas TT, PT and food preferences were not. It was concluded that variations in taste receptor, glucose transporter and gustducin encoding genes are related to taste perception, food preference and intake as well as the sugar-dependent caries disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
taste perception, taste preference, taste genes, diet preference, diet selection, caries
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162681 (URN)10.3390/nu11071491 (DOI)000478885400090 ()31261961 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2020-04-23Bibliographically approved
Mullee, A., Romaguera, D., Pearson-Stuttard, J., Viallon, V., Stepien, M., Freisling, H., . . . Murphy, N. (2019). Association Between Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries. JAMA Internal Medicine (11), 1479-1490
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association Between Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries
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2019 (English)In: JAMA Internal Medicine, ISSN 2168-6106, E-ISSN 2168-6114, no 11, p. 1479-1490Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Soft drinks are frequently consumed, but whether this consumption is associated with mortality risk is unknown and has been understudied in European populations to date.

Objective: To examine the association between total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink consumption and subsequent total and cause-specific mortality.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study involved participants (n = 451 743 of the full cohort) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), an ongoing, large multinational cohort of people from 10 European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom), with participants recruited between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2000. Excluded participants were those who reported cancer, heart disease, stroke, or diabetes at baseline; those with implausible dietary intake data; and those with missing soft drink consumption or follow-up information. Data analyses were performed from February 1, 2018, to October 1, 2018.

Exposure: Consumption of total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Total mortality and cause-specific mortality. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for other mortality risk factors.

Results: In total, 521 330 individuals were enrolled. Of this total, 451 743 (86.7%) were included in the study, with a mean (SD) age of 50.8 (9.8) years and with 321 081 women (71.1%). During a mean (range) follow-up of 16.4 (11.1 in Greece to 19.2 in France) years, 41 693 deaths occurred. Higher all-cause mortality was found among participants who consumed 2 or more glasses per day (vs consumers of <1 glass per month) of total soft drinks (hazard ratio [HR], 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11-1.22; P < .001), sugar-sweetened soft drinks (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P = .004), and artificially sweetened soft drinks (HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16-1.35; P < .001). Positive associations were also observed between artificially sweetened soft drinks and deaths from circulatory diseases (≥2 glasses per day vs <1 glass per month; HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.30-1.78; P < .001) and between sugar-sweetened soft drinks and deaths from digestive diseases (≥1 glass per day vs <1 glass per month; HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.24-2.05; P < .001).

Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that consumption of total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drinks was positively associated with all-cause deaths in this large European cohort; the results are supportive of public health campaigns aimed at limiting the consumption of soft drinks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association (AMA), 2019
National Category
Dentistry Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164265 (URN)10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2478 (DOI)000503214700008 ()31479109 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071732581 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NordForskSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research CouncilRegion SkåneVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-10-19 Created: 2019-10-19 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Esberg, A., Haworth, S., Brunius, C., Lif Holgerson, P. & Johansson, I. (2019). Carbonic Anhydrase 6 Gene Variation influences Oral Microbiota Composition and Caries Risk in Swedish adolescents. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 452.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbonic Anhydrase 6 Gene Variation influences Oral Microbiota Composition and Caries Risk in Swedish adolescents
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbonic anhydrase VI (CA6) catalyses the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in saliva with possible pH regulation, taste perception, and tooth formation effects. This study assessed effects of variation in the CA6 gene on oral microbiota and specifically the acidophilic and caries-associated Streptococcus mutans in 17-year old Swedish adolescents (n = 154). Associations with caries status and secreted CA6 protein were also evaluated. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (27 SNPs in 5 haploblocks) and saliva and tooth biofilm microbiota from Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA (V3-V4) sequencing and culturing were analysed. Haploblock 4 (rs10864376, rs3737665, rs12138897) CCC associated with low prevalence of S. mutans (OR (95% CI): 0.5 (0.3, 0.8)), and caries (OR 0.6 (0.3, 0.9)), whereas haploblock 4 TTG associated with high prevalence of S. mutans (OR: 2.7 (1.2, 5.9)) and caries (OR: 2.3 (1.2, 4.4)). The TTG-haploblock 4 (represented by rs12138897(G)) was characterized by S. mutans, Scardovia wiggsiae, Treponema sp. HOT268, Tannerella sp. HOT286, Veillonella gp.1 compared with the CCC-haploblock 4 (represented by rs12138897(C)). Secreted CA6 in saliva was weakly linked to CA6 gene variation. In conclusion, the results indicate that CA6 gene polymorphisms influence S. mutans colonization, tooth biofilm microbiota composition and risk of dental caries in Swedish adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155838 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-36832-z (DOI)000456553400018 ()30679524 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-01-29 Created: 2019-01-29 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Haworth, S., Fang Kho, P., Lif Holgerson, P., Hwang, L.-D., Timpson, N. J., Rentería, M. E., . . . Cuellar-Partida, G. (2019). Inference and visualization of phenome-wide causal relationships using genetic data: an application to dental caries and periodontitis.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inference and visualization of phenome-wide causal relationships using genetic data: an application to dental caries and periodontitis
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2019 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Hypothesis-free Mendelian randomization studies provide a way to assess the causal relevance of a trait across the human phenome but can be limited by statistical power or complicated by horizontal pleiotropy. The recently described latent causal variable (LCV) approach provides an alternative method for casual inference which might be useful in hypothesis-free experiments.

Methods: We developed an automated pipeline for phenome-wide tests using the LCV approach including steps to estimate partial genetic causality, filter to a meaningful set of estimates, apply correction for multiple testing and then present the findings in a graphical summary termed a causal architecture plot. We apply this process to body mass index and lipid traits as exemplars of traits where there is strong prior expectation for causal effects and dental caries and periodontitis as exemplars of traits where there is a need for causal inference.

Results: The results for lipids and BMI suggest that these traits are best viewed as creating consequences on a multitude of traits and conditions, thus providing additional evidence that supports viewing these traits as targets for interventions to improve health. On the other hand, caries and periodontitis are best viewed as a downstream consequence of other traits and diseases rather than a cause of ill health.

Conclusions: The automated process is available as part of the MASSIVE pipeline from the Complex-Traits Genetics Virtual Lab (https://vl.genoma.io) and results are available in (https://view.genoma.io). We propose causal architecture plots based on phenome-wide partial genetic causality estimates as a way visualizing the overall causal map of the human phenome.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-168741 (URN)10.1101/865956 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-03-09 Created: 2020-03-09 Last updated: 2020-03-10
Eriksson, L., Lif Holgerson, P., Esberg, A. & Johansson, I. (2018). Microbial complexes and caries in 17-year-olds with and without Streptococcus mutans. Journal of Dental Research, 97(3), 275-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial complexes and caries in 17-year-olds with and without Streptococcus mutans
2018 (English)In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streptococcus mutans is a key bacterial species in the caries process, which affects >90% of the population worldwide. However, other acidogenic and aciduric/acidophilic species may contribute to disease development. In Sweden, a country with low prevalences of caries and S. mutans, a significant portion of caries-affected adolescents lack detectable levels of S. mutans. The objectives of the present study were 1) to characterize the tooth biofilm and saliva microbiota of adolescents with caries disease, with or without detectable S. mutans, from tooth biofilm and saliva samples and 2) to assess taxa clustering in the tooth biofilm and saliva samples and relate this information to caries status. For 17-y-old participants ( N = 154), enamel and dentin caries (the total number of present carious surfaces in the enamel and dentin) and caries experience (the number of decayed and filled tooth surfaces) were recorded, dental biofilm and saliva samples obtained, and information on medical and lifestyle habits collected. Multiplex 16S rDNA (V3-V4) sequencing of bacterial DNA was performed with the Illumina MiSeq platform. The Human Oral Microbiome Database and the ProbeSeq pipeline were used in the HOMI NGS procedure. In subjects with caries experience, high levels of S. mutans were associated with a few species and low levels with a panel of saccharolytic species. Present caries was similarly associated with a panel of saccharolytic species in subjects without S. mutans. Furthermore, tooth biofilm microbiota could be used to establish 4 clusters of subjects with different caries experiences. In particular, high levels of S. mutans were associated with the presence of a few influential species in multivariate modeling, including Scardovia wiggsiae. By contrast, a panel of less avid lactic acid-producing species was influential in patients with undetectable or low S. mutans levels in such modeling. These findings support a prominent role of S. mutans in infected adolescents but also the ecologic concept, especially in S. mutans-free subjects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand oaks: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
microbiota, saliva, tooth biofilm, adolescents, 16S, high-throughput nucleotide sequencing
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139760 (URN)10.1177/0022034517731758 (DOI)000429319800005 ()28930642 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2020-04-24Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Esberg, A., Eriksson, L., Haworth, S. & Lif Holgerson, P. (2018). Self-reported bovine milk intake is associated with oral microbiota composition. PLoS ONE, 13(3), Article ID e0193504.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported bovine milk intake is associated with oral microbiota composition
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e0193504Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bovine milk intake has been associated with various disease outcomes, with modulation of the gastro-intestinal microbiome being suggested as one potential mechanism. The aim of the present study was to explore the oral microbiota in relation to variation in self-reported milk intake. Saliva and tooth biofilm microbiota was characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and cultivation in 154 Swedish adolescents, and information on diet and other lifestyle markers were obtained from a questionnaire, and dental caries from clinical examination. A replication cohort of 31,571 adults with similar information on diet intake, other lifestyle markers and caries was also studied. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) modelling separated adolescents with low milk intake (lowest tertile with <0.4 servings/day) apart from those with high intake of milk (≥3.7 servings/day) based on saliva and tooth biofilm, respectively. Taxa in several genera contributed to this separation, and milk intake was inversely associated with the caries causing Streptococcus mutans in saliva and tooth biofilm samples by sequencing, PCR and cultivation. Despite the difference in S. mutans colonization, caries prevalence did not differ between milk consumption groups in the adolescents or the adults in the replication cohort, which may reflect that a significant positive association between intake of milk and sweet products was present in both the study and replication group. It was concluded that high milk intake correlates with different oral microbiota and it is hypothesized that milk may confer similar effects in the gut. The study also illustrated that reduction of one single disease associated bacterial species, such as S. mutans by milk intake, may modulate but not prevent development of complex diseases, such as caries, due to adverse effects from other causal factors, such as sugar intake in the present study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Fransisco: Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2018
Keywords
saliva-coated hydroxyapatite, dairy products, streptococcus mutans, dental caries, cardiovascular disease, lactase persistence, in vitro, health, cancer, mortality
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146286 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0193504 (DOI)000427931600019 ()29561863 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gyll, J., Ridell, K., Öhlund, I., Akeson, P. K., Johansson, I. & Lif Holgerson, P. (2018). Vitamin D status and dental caries in healthy Swedish children. Nutrition Journal, 17, Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vitamin D status and dental caries in healthy Swedish children
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2018 (English)In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 17, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Vitamin D is crucial for mineralized tissue formation and immunological functions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between vitamin D status and dental status in healthy children with vitamin D supplementation in infancy and at 6 years of age.

Method: Eight-year-old children who had participated, in a vitamin D intervention project when they were 6 years old were invited to participate in a dental follow-up study. They had fair or darker skin complexion and represented two geographically distant parts of Sweden. 25-hydroxy vitamin D in serum had been measured at 6 years of age and after a 3-month intervention with 25, 10 or 2 (placebo) mu g of vitamin D-3 per day. Two years later, caries and enamel defects were scored, self-reported information on e.g., oral behavior, dietary habits and intake of vitamin D supplements was collected, and innate immunity peptide LL37 levels in saliva and cariogenic mutant streptococci in tooth biofilm were analyzed. The outcome variables were caries and tooth enamel defects.

Results: Dental status was evaluated in 85 of the 206 children in the basic intervention study. Low vitamin D levels were found in 28% at baseline compared to 11% after the intervention, and 34% reported continued intake of vitamin D supplements. Logistic regression supported a weak inverse association between vitamin D status at 6 years of age and caries 2 years later (odds ratio 0.96; p = 0.024) with minor attenuation after an adjustment for potential confounders. Multivariate projection regression confirmed that insufficient vitamin D levels correlated with caries and higher vitamin D levels correlated with being caries-free. Vitamin D status at 6 years of age was unrelated to enamel defects but was positively associated with saliva LL37 levels.

Conclusion: An association between vitamin D status and caries was supported, but it was not completely consistent. Vitamin D status at 6 years of age was unrelated to enamel defects but was positively associated with LL37 expression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Vitamin D, Children, caries, enamel defects, LL37
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144348 (URN)10.1186/s12937-018-0318-1 (DOI)000419960300001 ()29338758 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Figueira, J., Gouveia-Figueira, S., Öhman, C., Lif Holgerson, P., Nording, M. L. & Öhman, A. (2017). Metabolite quantification by NMR and LC-MS/MS reveals differences between unstimulated, stimulated, and pure parotid saliva. Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, 140, 295-300
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metabolite quantification by NMR and LC-MS/MS reveals differences between unstimulated, stimulated, and pure parotid saliva
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, ISSN 0731-7085, E-ISSN 1873-264X, Vol. 140, p. 295-300Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Saliva is a readily available biofluid that is sensitive to metabolic changes and can be collected through rapid and non-invasive collection procedures, and it shows great promise for clinical metabolomic studies. This work studied the metabolite composition of, and the differences between, saliva samples collected by unstimulated spitting/drooling, paraffin chewing-stimulated spitting, and parotid gland suction using targeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for metabolite quantification. As applied here, these two analytical techniques provide complementary metabolite information and together extend the metabolome coverage with robust NMR quantification of soluble metabolites and sensitive targeted LC-MS/MS analysis of bioactive lipids in specific metabolic pathways. The NMR analysis was performed on ultrafiltrated (3kDa cutoff) saliva samples and resulted in a total of 45 quantified metabolites. The LC-MS/MS analysis was performed on both filtered and unfiltered samples and resulted in the quantification of two endocannabinoids (AEA and PEA) and 22 oxylipins, which at present is the most comprehensive targeted analysis of bioactive lipids in human saliva. Important differences in the metabolite composition were observed between the three saliva sample collection methods, which should be taken into consideration when designing metabolomic studies of saliva. Furthermore, the combined use of the two metabolomics platforms (NMR and LC-MS/MS) proved to be viable for research and clinical studies of the salivary metabolome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Eicosanoids, Endocannabinoids, LC-MS/MS, NMR, Oxylipins, Saliva
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134056 (URN)10.1016/j.jpba.2017.03.037 (DOI)000402850500036 ()28380387 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-26 Created: 2017-04-26 Last updated: 2020-03-12Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2779-5865

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