umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Lindahl, Olof A
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Lindahl, O. A., Ramser, K., Bäcklund, T., Ljungberg, B. & Bergh, A. (2018). Prostate cancer detection ex vivo combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology. In: Eskola, H Vaisanen, O Viik, J Hyttinen, J (Ed.), EMBEC & NBC 2017: . Paper presented at Joint Conference of the European Medical and Biological Engineering Conference (EMBEC) / Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics (NBC), JUN, 2017, Tampere, FINLAND (pp. 193-196). SPRINGER-VERLAG SINGAPORE PTE LTD
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prostate cancer detection ex vivo combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology
Show others...
2018 (English)In: EMBEC & NBC 2017 / [ed] Eskola, H Vaisanen, O Viik, J Hyttinen, J, SPRINGER-VERLAG SINGAPORE PTE LTD , 2018, p. 193-196Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the western world. The most prevalent curative treatment is radical prostatectomy. However, prostate surgery can give unwanted side effects and there is a need for an instrument that can provide decision support to the surgeon during surgery on the presence of cancer cells in the surgical margin. A dual modality probe, combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology, has been used for detecting cancer in fresh human prostate tissue. The tactile resonance modality measures the tissue stiffness and Raman spectroscopy depicts the molecular content in tissue, both related to cancer. After ethical approval, the study investigated the potential of the dual-modality probe by testing its ability to differentiate between normal and cancerous prostate tissue ex vivo. It also investigated the minimal amount of measurement points needed to securely detect cancer on the surface of prostate tissue. Measurements on three prostate tissue slices show that the tactile resonance modality measuring stiffness was able to detect differences between normal and cancerous tissue on a significant level of 90%, but the sample size was too low to draw any firm conclusions. It was also suggested from the study results that the high wavenumber region in the Raman spectrum can give valuable information about cancer in prostate tissue. A number of 24 measurement points were enough for detecting cancer in prostate slices in this study. It can be suggested from this study that combining these two sensor modalities is promising for accurate detection of prostate cancer that is needed during prostate surgery, but more measurements including more prostates must be performed before the full value of the study result can be established.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER-VERLAG SINGAPORE PTE LTD, 2018
Series
IFMBE Proceedings, ISSN 1680-0737 ; 65
Keywords
Raman spectroscopy, tactile resonance technology, prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy, surgical margin
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155049 (URN)10.1007/978-981-10-5122-7_49 (DOI)000449778900049 ()978-981-10-5121-0 (ISBN)978-981-10-5122-7 (ISBN)
Conference
Joint Conference of the European Medical and Biological Engineering Conference (EMBEC) / Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics (NBC), JUN, 2017, Tampere, FINLAND
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Åstrand, A., Andersson, B., Jalkanen, V., Börje, L., Anders, B. & Lindahl, O. (2017). Prostate cancer detection with a tactile resonance sensor: measurement considerations and clinical setup. Sensors, 17(11), Article ID 2453.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prostate cancer detection with a tactile resonance sensor: measurement considerations and clinical setup
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 17, no 11, article id 2453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tumors in the human prostate are usually stiffer compared to surrounding non-malignant glandular tissue, and tactile resonance sensors measuring stiffness can be used to detect prostate cancer. To explore this further, we used a tactile resonance sensor system combined with a rotatable sample holder where whole surgically removed prostates could be attached to detect tumors on, and beneath, the surface ex vivo. Model studies on tissue phantoms made of silicone and porcine tissue were performed. Finally, two resected human prostate glands were studied. Embedded stiff silicone inclusions placed 4 mm under the surface could be detected in both the silicone and biological tissue models, with a sensor indentation of 0.6 mm. Areas with different amounts of prostate cancer (PCa) could be distinguished from normal tissue (p < 0.05), when the tumor was located in the anterior part, whereas small tumors located in the dorsal aspect were undetected. The study indicates that PCa may be detected in a whole resected prostate with an uneven surface and through its capsule. This is promising for the development of a clinically useful instrument to detect prostate cancer during surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Switzerland: MDPI AG, 2017
Keywords
tissue stiffness, resonance sensor, tactile sensor, prostate cancer, piezoelectric sensor
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141158 (URN)10.3390/s17112453 (DOI)000416790500015 ()
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Murayama, Y. & Lindahl, O. A. (2017). Sensitivity improvements of a resonance-based tactile sensor.. Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, 41(2), 131-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensitivity improvements of a resonance-based tactile sensor.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Resonance-based contact-impedance measurement refers to the application of resonance sensors based on the measurement of the changes in the resonance curve of an ultrasonic resonator in contact with a surface. The advantage of the resonance sensor is that it is very sensitive to small changes in the contact impedance. A sensitive micro tactile sensor (MTS) was developed, which measured the elasticity of soft living tissues at the single-cell level. In the present paper, we studied the method of improving the touch and stiffness sensitivity of the MTS. First, the dependence of touch sensitivity in relation to the resonator length was studied by calculating the sensitivity coefficient at each length ranging from 9 to 40 mm. The highest touch sensitivity was obtained with a 30-mm-long glass needle driven at a resonance frequency of 100 kHz. Next, the numerical calculation of contact impedance showed that the highest stiffness sensitivity was achieved when the driving frequency was 100 kHz and the contact-tip diameter of the MTS was 10 μm. The theoretical model was then confirmed experimentally using a phase-locked-loop-based digital feedback oscillation circuit. It was found that the developed MTS, whose resonant frequency was 97.030 kHz, performed with the highest sensitivity of 53.2 × 10(6) Hz/N at the driving frequency of 97.986 kHz, i.e. the highest sensitivity was achieved at 956 Hz above the resonant frequency.

Keywords
Resonance-based sensor, Young’s modulus, contact impedance, stiffness sensitivity, tactile
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133977 (URN)10.1080/03091902.2016.1239278 (DOI)27701917 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-24 Created: 2017-04-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hellström, T., Lindahl, O., Bäcklund, T., Karlsson, M., Hohnloser, P., Bråndal, A., . . . Wester, P. (2016). An intelligent rollator for mobility impaired persons, especially stroke patients. Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, 40(5), 270-279
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An intelligent rollator for mobility impaired persons, especially stroke patients
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 270-279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An intelligent rollator (IRO) was developed that aims at obstacle detection and guidance to avoid collisions and accidental falls. The IRO is a retrofit four-wheeled rollator with an embedded computer, two solenoid brakes, rotation sensors on the wheels and IR-distance sensors. The value reported by each distance sensor was compared in the computer to a nominal distance. Deviations indicated a present obstacle and caused activation of one of the brakes in order to influence the direction of motion to avoid the obstacle. The IRO was tested by seven healthy subjects with simulated restricted and blurred sight and five stroke subjects on a standardised indoor track with obstacles. All tested subjects walked faster with intelligence deactivated. Three out of five stroke patients experienced more detected obstacles with intelligence activated. This suggests enhanced safety during walking with IRO. Further studies are required to explore the full value of the IRO.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Assistive technology, intelligent walker, stroke
National Category
Clinical Medicine Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131356 (URN)10.3109/03091902.2016.1167973 (DOI)27078084 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-13 Created: 2017-02-13 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
Alrifaiy, A., Borg, J., Lindahl, O. A. & Ramser, K. (2015). A lab-on-a-chip for hypoxic patch clamp measurements combined with optical tweezers and spectroscopy-first investigations of single biological cells. Biomedical engineering online, 14, Article ID 36.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A lab-on-a-chip for hypoxic patch clamp measurements combined with optical tweezers and spectroscopy-first investigations of single biological cells
2015 (English)In: Biomedical engineering online, ISSN 1475-925X, E-ISSN 1475-925X, Vol. 14, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The response and the reaction of the brain system to hypoxia is a vital research subject that requires special instrumentation. With this research subject in focus, a new multifunctional lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with control over the oxygen content for studies on biological cells was developed. The chip was designed to incorporate the patch clamp technique, optical tweezers and absorption spectroscopy. The performance of the LOC was tested by a series of experiments. The oxygen content within the channels of the LOC was monitored by an oxygen sensor and verified by simultaneously studying the oxygenation state of chicken red blood cells (RBCs) with absorption spectra. The chicken RBCs were manipulated optically and steered in three dimensions towards a patch-clamp micropipette in a closed microfluidic channel. The oxygen level within the channels could be changed from a normoxic value of 18% O-2 to an anoxic value of 0.0-0.5% O-2. A time series of 3 experiments were performed, showing that the spectral transfer from the oxygenated to the deoxygenated state occurred after about 227 +/- 1 s and a fully developed deoxygenated spectrum was observed after 298 +/- 1 s, a mean value of 3 experiments. The tightness of the chamber to oxygen diffusion was verified by stopping the flow into the channel system while continuously recording absorption spectra showing an unchanged deoxygenated state during 5400 +/- 2 s. A transfer of the oxygenated absorption spectra was achieved after 426 +/- 1 s when exposing the cell to normoxic buffer. This showed the long time viability of the investigated cells. Successful patching and sealing were established on a trapped RBC and the whole-cell access (Ra) and membrane (Rm) resistances were measured to be 5.033 +/- 0.412 M Omega and 889.7 +/- 1.74 M Omega respectively.

Keywords
Microfluidic system, Hypoxia, Patch clamp, Optical tweezers, Absorption spectroscopy, Oxygen sensor
National Category
Other Medical Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-103213 (URN)10.1186/s12938-015-0024-6 (DOI)000353330300001 ()25907197 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-21 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, M., Jalkanen, V., Ramser, K., Ljungberg, B., Bergh, A. & Lindahl, O. A. (2015). Dual-modality probe intended for prostate cancer detection combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology—discrimination of normal human prostate tissues ex vivo. Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, 39(3), 198-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual-modality probe intended for prostate cancer detection combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology—discrimination of normal human prostate tissues ex vivo
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 198-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the western world. For the first time, a dual-modality probe, combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology, has been used for assessment of fresh human prostate tissue. The study investigates the potential of the dual-modality probe by testing its ability to differentiate prostate tissue types ex vivo. Measurements on four prostates show that the tactile resonance modality was able to discriminate soft epithelial tissue and stiff stroma (p<0.05). The Raman spectra exhibited a strong fluorescent background at the current experimental settings. However, stroma could be discerned from epithelia by integrating the value of the spectral background. Combining both parameters by a stepwise analysis resulted in 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Although no cancer tissue was analysed, the results are promising for further development of the instrument and method for discriminating prostate tissues and cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
Prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy, raman spectroscopy, tactile resonance technology, tissue autofluorescence
National Category
Medical Engineering Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-103285 (URN)10.3109/03091902.2015.1021430 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-05-19 Created: 2015-05-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Åstrand, A. P., Andersson, B. M., Jalkanen, V. & Lindahl, O. A. (2015). Initial Measurements on Whole Human Prostate ex vivo with a Tactile Resonance Sensor in Order to Detect Prostate Cancer. In: Henrik Mindedal, Mikael Persson (Ed.), 16th Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering: 16. NBC & 10. MTD 2014 joint conferences. October 14-16, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden. Paper presented at 16th Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering October 14-16, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 120-123). Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Initial Measurements on Whole Human Prostate ex vivo with a Tactile Resonance Sensor in Order to Detect Prostate Cancer
2015 (English)In: 16th Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering: 16. NBC & 10. MTD 2014 joint conferences. October 14-16, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden / [ed] Henrik Mindedal, Mikael Persson, Springer International Publishing , 2015, p. 120-123Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common form of cancer among the male population in Europe and the USA. PCa can be suspected by a blood test for a specific prostate antigen, a PSA-test, followed by a digital rectal examination (DRE). The objective with the DRE is to investigate the presence of stiff nodules on the prostate. Stiff nodules can indicate PCa and biopsies are taken from the suspicious parts of the prostate using guidance of a transrectal ultrasound. Microscopic evaluation of the biopsies is used for final diagnosis. Superficial tumor growth on, and beneath the surface of the gland is of special interest as it suggests that the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Tactile resonance sensors can be used to distinguish between areas of different stiffness in soft tissue. The aim was to detect tumors on, and beneath the surface of a whole human prostate ex vivo.

A tactile resonance sensor system (TRSS) based on a piezoelectric resonance sensor and a force sensor has been used to detect areas with increased stiffness in soft tissue. The TRSS has a rotatable sample holder for measurements on spherical shaped samples. Stiffness measurements were made on samples of porcine muscle tissue with embedded stiff silicone nodules placed under the surface. Further measurements were made on a resected whole human prostate with PCa.

The results showed that through the measured stiffness parameter, the stiff silicone nodules placed down to 4 mm under the surface could be detected. The measurements on the prostate showed that elevated values of the stiffness parameter correlated (p < 0.05) with areas in the anterior of the prostate where cancer tumors were detected by histopathological evaluation. The tumors were significantly stiffer than the healthy tissue in the dorsal region.

The results are promising for further development of a clinically useful instrument to detect superficial PCa.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing, 2015
Series
IFMBE Proceedings, ISSN 1680-0737 ; 48
Keywords
Prostate cancer, Tissue stiffness, Resonance sensors
National Category
Medical Engineering Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97279 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-12967-9_33 (DOI)000347893000033 ()978-3-319-12966-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-12967-9 (ISBN)
Conference
16th Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering October 14-16, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2014-12-12 Created: 2014-12-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, O. A., Nyberg, M., Jalkanen, V. & Ramser, K. (2015). Prostate cancer detection using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and stiffness sensing. In: Fong-Chin Su, Shyh-Hau Wang, Ming-Long Yeh (Ed.), 1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering: October 9-12, 2014, Tainan, Taiwan. Paper presented at 1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering & 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, October 9-12, 2014, Tainan, Taiwan (pp. 267-270). Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prostate cancer detection using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and stiffness sensing
2015 (English)In: 1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering: October 9-12, 2014, Tainan, Taiwan / [ed] Fong-Chin Su, Shyh-Hau Wang, Ming-Long Yeh, Springer International Publishing , 2015, p. 267-270Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer form for men in Europe. A sensor system combining Raman spectroscopy and stiffness sensing with a resonance sensor has recently been developed by us for prostate cancer detection. In this study the sensor system has been used for measurements on two slices of fresh human prostate tissue. The stiffness sensor could detect locations slices with significantly different stiffness contrasts (p < 0.05). Raman spectroscopic measurements could be performed with the dual-modality probe for tissue classification. The findings are important for the continued development of a combination probe for prostate cancer detection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing, 2015
Series
IFMBE Proceedings, ISSN 1680-0737 ; 47
Keywords
Fiber optical Raman spectroscopy, tactile resonance sensor technology, histopathology, prostate cancer detection, radical
National Category
Medical Engineering Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97278 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-12262-5_74 (DOI)000349915800074 ()978-3-319-12261-8 (ISBN)978-3-319-12262-5 (ISBN)
Conference
1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering & 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, October 9-12, 2014, Tainan, Taiwan
Available from: 2014-12-12 Created: 2014-12-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, M., Jalkanen, V., Ramser, K., Ljungberg, B., Bergh, A. & Lindahl, O. A. (2014). First study on freshly operated prostate tissue using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance sensor technology. In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2014: Göteborg, 14-16 oktober, 2014. Paper presented at 16. NBC & 10. MTD 2014 joint conferences. October 14-16, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 26-26).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First study on freshly operated prostate tissue using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance sensor technology
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2014: Göteborg, 14-16 oktober, 2014, 2014, p. 26-26Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical Engineering Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97281 (URN)
Conference
16. NBC & 10. MTD 2014 joint conferences. October 14-16, 2014, Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2014-12-12 Created: 2014-12-12 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, U. G., Lindahl, O. A. & Andersson, B. M. (2014). Modeling the high-frequency complex modulus of a silicone rubber using standing lamb waves and an inverse finite element method. IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, 61(12), 2106-2120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling the high-frequency complex modulus of a silicone rubber using standing lamb waves and an inverse finite element method
2014 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, ISSN 0885-3010, E-ISSN 1525-8955, Vol. 61, no 12, p. 2106-2120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To gain an understanding of the high-frequency elastic properties of silicone rubber, a finite element model of a cylindrical piezoelectric element, in contact with a silicone rubber disk, was constructed. The frequency dependent elastic modulus of the silicone rubber was modeled by a four parameter fractional derivative viscoelastic model in the 100 kHz to 250 kHz frequency range. The calculations were carried out in the range of the first radial resonance frequency of the sensor. At the resonance, the hyperelastic effect of the silicone rubber was modeled by a hyperelastic compensating function. The calculated response was matched to the measured response by using the transitional peaks in the impedance spectrum that originates from the switching of standing Lamb wave modes in the silicone rubber. To validate the results, the impedance responses of three 5 mm thick silicone rubber disks, with different radial lengths, were measured. The calculated and measured transitional frequencies have been compared in detail. The comparison showed very good agreement, with average relative differences of 0.7 %, 0.6 %, and 0.7 % for the silicone rubber samples with radial lengths of 38.0 mm, 21.4 mm, and 11.0 mm, respectively. The average, complex, elastic modulus of the samples were: (0.97 + 0.009i) GPa at 100 kHz and (0.97 + 0.005i) GPa at 250 kHz.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Press, 2014
Keywords
piezoelectric, silicone rubber, impedance, resonance, lamb waves, phantom
National Category
Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Research subject
Electronics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88214 (URN)10.1109/TUFFC.2014.006471 (DOI)000345944300017 ()
Available from: 2014-04-28 Created: 2014-04-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications