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Dziuban, C., Graham, C. R., Moskal, P. D., Norberg, A. & Sicilia, N. (2018). Blended learning: the new normal and emerging technologies. International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education, 15(1), Article ID 3.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blended learning: the new normal and emerging technologies
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education, ISSN 2365-9440, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study addressed several outcomes, implications, and possible future directions for blended learning (BL) in higher education in a world where information communication technologies (ICTs) increasingly communicate with each other. In considering effectiveness, the authors contend that BL coalesces around access, success, and students' perception of their learning environments. Success and withdrawal rates for face-to-face and online courses are compared to those for BL as they interact with minority status. Investigation of student perception about course excellence revealed the existence of robust if-then decision rules for determining how students evaluate their educational experiences. Those rules were independent of course modality, perceived content relevance, and expected grade. The authors conclude that although blended learning preceded modern instructional technologies, its evolution will be inextricably bound to contemporary information communication technologies that are approximating some aspects of human thought processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Blended learning, Higher education, Student success, Student perception of instruction, New normal
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147898 (URN)10.1186/s41239-017-0087-5 (DOI)000426092200001 ()
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Norberg, A. (2018). Using Philosophy of Information to look at teaching, technology and networked learning. In: M. Bajić, N.B. Dohn, M. de Laat, P. Jandrić, T. Ryberg (Ed.), Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Networked Learning 2018: . Paper presented at 11th International Conference on Networked Learning 2018, 14-16 May, Zagreb, Croatia (pp. 3-10).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Philosophy of Information to look at teaching, technology and networked learning
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Networked Learning 2018 / [ed] M. Bajić, N.B. Dohn, M. de Laat, P. Jandrić, T. Ryberg, 2018, p. 3-10Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

 In this conceptual paper, Luciano Floridi's philosophy of Information (PI) is interpreted and used for generating and presenting alternative or deviating, even provoking, understanding and scenarios on Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), in connection with teaching and networked learning, today and in the future. The relation between teacher and technology and the functions of networked learning are here in focus for the application of Philosophy of information (PI) on issues of teachers, learners and technology. We are as humans, according to Floridi, presently changing our self-understanding, as we also have done at earlier occasions during history, for adapting to scientific and technological developments while still keeping but also changing our agency as humans. Humans are seen as the only known "semantic engines" in the world. The digital technology we presently use, with ICTs who process information and communicates in networks to other ICTs, changes our position and role as humans, as information-processing earlier was purely human activity. Now we have ICTs that are "syntactical engines"; they can process information both fast and precise, although they have "intelligence as a toaster". Humans today are in PI called "inforgs", living in an "infosphere", where information is the most critical asset, and we increasingly experience the world in informational terms. Floridi categorises ICTs as documenting, communicating and information-processing. A longer historical perspective on ICTs in teaching and learning, from Sumer 2000 B.C. and forward leads here to questioning if not the concepts of distance-, e- and online learning are soon old and obsolete, and mainly were continuing something traditional. What is characteristic for digital ICTs is according to Floridi the processing of information, and what we can find when we look for these ICTs in teaching and learning is Learning Analytics, Adaptive Learning, Calibrated Peer Review and similar ICTs for e-teaching. Furthermore, the general concepts of living together with information-processing ICTs are re-ontologisation, enveloping and transdiegetisation. These concepts describe what the ongoing integration of ICTs affects the human, as a teacher or a learner. Networked learning persists and is highly relevant, but includes also networking with applications of artificial intelligence. A critical discussion wraps up the paper.

Keywords
Teaching, E-teaching, Teaching and technology, Networked learning, Philosophy of Information, enveloping, re-ontologisation, transdiegetisation, informational friction
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147919 (URN)978-1-86220-337-2 (ISBN)
Conference
11th International Conference on Networked Learning 2018, 14-16 May, Zagreb, Croatia
Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Norberg, A. (2017). From blended learning to learning onlife: ICTs, time and access in higher education. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From blended learning to learning onlife: ICTs, time and access in higher education
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Information and Communication Technologies, ICTs, has now for decades being increasingly taken into use for higher education, enabling distance learning, e-learning and online learning, mainly in parallel to mainstream educational practise. The concept Blended learning (BL) aims at the integration of ICTs with these existing educational practices. The term is frequently used, but there is no agreed-upon definition. The general aim of this dissertation is to identify new possible perspectives on ICTs and access to higher education, for negotiating the dichotomy between campus-based and ICT-enabled education. The access options of BL are in focus for this dissertation, although BL is generally seen as a campus phenomenon, and shares a place perspective. The main research questions in the dissertation are 1) how BL can be understood in the context of increased access to education, moreover, (2) how time can be work as a more constructive perspective for designing ICTs in education, compared to place. The dissertation comprises five articles. The first is conceptual and concentrates on place and time in blended learning, and forms a time-based model and perspective, drawing on the tension between synchronous and asynchronous modalities instead of a place-based center-periphery model. The following article examines the differences between North American and European use of the term BL, in education and research, and finds that BL is not much used by European researchers, although the term is frequently used in educational environments. Two design and intervention studies, articles 3 and 4, make experiments using the BL time-based model. In article 3, a group of untraditional learners at a learning centre in Arvidsjaur attends a synchronous co-located study circle group and participates in an asynchronous and global Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). In article 4, nine students in a preparatory year for entering engineering studies volunteer and participate in a pilot distance course experiment, where prevention of procrastination is a high priority. For this, agile framework theory, constructivist learning theory and the time-based model are used in design and analysis. The last article (5) reconnects learning to place by discussing and adapting Triple- and Quadruple Helix theory for regional development in the knowledge society to four regional European cases. At the end of the synthesis, an outline of the access affordances with the time-based model is given, drawing on Adam’s timescape theory. The discussion of ICT integration into education is made drawing on Floridi’s Philosophy of Information, which provides many tools to view discourses of ICTs in education critically, and also envisions the concept of e-ducation in the infosphere, where other blend issues appear connected to weak artificial intelligence and the pervasive power of ICTs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University, 2017. p. 96 + 7
Series
Doktorsavhandlingar i pedagogiskt arbete, ISSN 1650-8858 ; 72
Series
The Post-Graduate School of the Educational Sciences ; 17
Keywords
blended learning, distance learning, e-learning, online learning, ICTs, synchronous learning, asynchronous learning, philosophy of information, learning onlife
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130567 (URN)978-91-7601-622-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-02-16, N320, Naturvetarhuset, plan 3, Johan Bures väg 16, Umeå, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Alexiadou, N. & Norberg, A. (2017). Sweden’s Double Decade for Roma Inclusion: An Examination of Education Policy in Context. European Education: Issues and Studies, 49(1), 36-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden’s Double Decade for Roma Inclusion: An Examination of Education Policy in Context
2017 (English)In: European Education: Issues and Studies, ISSN 1056-4934, E-ISSN 1944-7086, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 36-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyzes the Swedish Strategy for Roma Inclusion. Drawing on interviews and documentary materials produced around the Strategy by official sources and Roma organizations, we describe its background, rationale, and evolution, as well as the rifts it has revealed around the issues of minority representation and the framing of inclusion. We describe the Strategy as a framework for education policy, aligned with the European Framework for Roma integration, and discuss it in relation to issues of representation, inclusion, and policy formation. We argue that, at the discursive level, the Strategy has engaged positively with the politics of Roma inclusion and has introduced a number of new issues in the public debate. However, at the same time it has given rise to policy tensions that reflect inadequate representation of and discussions with Roma stakeholders. For policy makers this has presented opportunities to rethink the design of the Strategy and to opt for an open final text that allows for a more versatile and flexible set of policy options to emerge at the local level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
Keywords
Swedish Strategy, Roma inclusion, education policy
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132373 (URN)10.1080/10564934.2017.1280342 (DOI)000396674800003 ()
Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Norberg, A., Stöckel, B. & Antti, M.-L. (2017). Time Shifting and Agile Time Boxes in Course Design. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 18(6), 88-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time Shifting and Agile Time Boxes in Course Design
2017 (English)In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 88-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ongoing integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) into higher education courses is often called blended learning although it often relates to course design. It is usually understood in place categories, as a combination of traditional classroom-based sessions and Internet-enabled distance or online learning practices. One alternative understanding of ICT integration can be constructed of time categories, with an understanding of ICTs more as process- and project-related. Two such design frameworks are conceptually presented and then used together in a small case study in a pilot experiment in physics at the preparatory level for entering engineering programs at a university in Northern Sweden. These are a) time shift mechanisms between synchronous and asynchronous learning modes in the course process and b) agile frameworks mechanisms adapted from work process developments in the software industry. Both are here used to address common procrastination problems in flexible education. Data were collected in student interviews and analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results show student satisfaction with the work rhythm and that a feeling of presence, which enables easy interaction, can be facilitated by synchronicity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athabasca University Press, 2017
Keywords
blended learning
National Category
Pedagogy Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130595 (URN)000418520900006 ()
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2017-01-25 Created: 2017-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Kolehmainen, J., Irvine, J., Stewart, L., Karácsonyi, Z., Szabó, T., Alarinta, J. & Norberg, A. (2016). Quadruple Helix, Innovation and the Knowledge-Based Development: Lessons from Remote, Rural and Less-Favoured Regions. Journal of the Knowledge Economy, 7(1), 23-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quadruple Helix, Innovation and the Knowledge-Based Development: Lessons from Remote, Rural and Less-Favoured Regions
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2016 (English)In: Journal of the Knowledge Economy, ISSN 1868-7865, E-ISSN 1868-7873, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 23-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper addresses the dynamics of knowledge-based development of remote, rural and less-favoured regions. Many of the regional strategies and policies aimed at developing innovation emanate from policymakers in centrally located urban conurbations and are assumed to be universally applicable. An example is the classical “triple helix” model and its successors for economic development based around the idea of universities, business and public sector organisations all coming together to foster innovation and economic prosperity. In many remote, rural and less-favoured localities, there may not be a university or other knowledge-intensive institution present which makes a difference from the point of view of local development agendas. In many regions, also the business community may be scattered and insufficiently developed in terms of innovation. And furthermore, this kind of region may also have a weak public sector to enhance innovativeness. In such regions, social and community groups may often play the dominant entrepreneurial role. The community may also play a significant role in remote, rural and less-favoured regions where the basic elements of “triple helix” model are present. In this respect the concept of a “quadruple helix” is highly beneficial. This is the case, because innovation processes are becoming increasingly open to different stakeholders. In this paper, four illustrative cases of knowledge-based development processes and policies in remote, rural and less-favoured regions are analysed by using a “double-coin model of knowledge-based regional development” which places the quadruple helix model at the very heart of knowledge-based regional development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2016
Keywords
Knowledge-based Regional development, Quadruple Helix, Triple helix, Quadruple helix, Double-coin mode
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108637 (URN)10.1007/s13132-015-0289-9 (DOI)000407740100002 ()2-s2.0-84959086252 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-15 Created: 2015-09-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Norberg, A. (2015). Användning av MOOCs i organisationer och på lärcentra. In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015: Gränslös kunskap. Paper presented at Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015, Gränslös kunskap, Umeå, 8-9 oktober 2015 (pp. 52-53). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Användning av MOOCs i organisationer och på lärcentra
2015 (Swedish)In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015: Gränslös kunskap, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2015, p. 52-53Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2015
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114129 (URN)
Conference
Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015, Gränslös kunskap, Umeå, 8-9 oktober 2015
Available from: 2016-01-14 Created: 2016-01-14 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Jahnke, I., Mårell-Olsson, E., Lars, N., Olsson, A. & Norberg, A. (2015). Digital didactical designs: reimagining designs for teaching and learning. In: Educational development in a changing world: . Paper presented at ICED 2014: Educational development in a changing World, 16-18 june 2014, Stockholm, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital didactical designs: reimagining designs for teaching and learning
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2015 (English)In: Educational development in a changing world, 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In order to progress in educational development, digitaldidactical designs area promising approach. Ourthreestudies show principlesof new designs including a) new learning goals where more than one correct answer exists, b) focus on learning as a process in informal-in-formal learning using guided reflections, c) making learning visible in different products. The studies illustratethatit is time for re-consideringestablished concepts of teaching–higher educationmovesfrom course-based learning into learning expeditions.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109105 (URN)
Conference
ICED 2014: Educational development in a changing World, 16-18 june 2014, Stockholm, Sweden
Available from: 2015-09-18 Created: 2015-09-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Alexiadou, N. & Norberg, A. (2015). Roma, Education, and Higher Education policies: The International Context and the Case of Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Roma, Education, and Higher Education policies: The International Context and the Case of Sweden
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 30
Series
Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) - Research and Innovation Staff Exchange ; Grant agreement No 643739
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101977 (URN)
Projects
Higher Education Internationalisation and Mobility: Inclusion, Equalities and Innovation Project
Note

A Project funded by Horizon 2020: The EU Programme for Research and innovation Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA) - Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE).

Grant agreement No 643739

Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2015-04-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Norberg, A., Händel, Å. & Ödling, P. (2015). Using MOOCs at Learning Centers in Northern Sweden. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 16(6), 137-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using MOOCs at Learning Centers in Northern Sweden
2015 (English)In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 137-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the use of globally accessible Massive Open Online Courses, MOOCs, for addressing the needs of lifelong learners at community learning centers in Northern Sweden, by the forming "glonacal" or "blended" MOOCs. The Scandinavian "study circle" concept is used to facilitate the studying of MOOCs. Although the technical possibilities for Swedish universities to offer accessible education are constantly increasing, most Swedish universities do not, at present, prioritize courses for off-campus students. The available web courses in asynchronous formats are difficult to master for untraditional learners and leaves the learning centers with limited possibilities. Therefore, a Nordplus Horizontal project 2014-2016 with partners in three Nordic countries is developing models for the use of MOOCs in learning centers and organisations. A small pilot course case at the learning centre in Arvidsjaur and its outcomes is presented, including the interactions with Lund University which has an ongoing piloting project on use and examination of MOOCs. This concept development is discussed as a blended learning design and as a "glonacal" phenomenon with Marginson and Rhoades' "glonacal agency heuristics" (2002) forming a background for an actor analysis. Future scenarios are outlined. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Athabasca, Canada: Athabasca University, 2015
Keywords
Open educational practices, MOOC, Blended learning, Study circle, Learning center, glonacal
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114683 (URN)10.19173/irrodl.v16i6.2035 (DOI)000380030700009 ()
Projects
NORDPLUS Horizontal: Global Cloud Services - Local Lifelong Learners
Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0662-9136

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