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Schleucher, Juergen
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Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Cormier, M.-A., Werner, R. A., Sauer, P. E., Gröcke, D. R., Leuenberger, M. C., Wieloch, T., . . . Kahmen, A. (2018). 2H-fractionations during the biosynthesis of carbohydrates and lipids imprint a metabolic signal on the δ2H values of plant organic compounds. New Phytologist, 218(2), 479-491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>2H-fractionations during the biosynthesis of carbohydrates and lipids imprint a metabolic signal on the δ2H values of plant organic compounds
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2018 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 218, no 2, p. 479-491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hydrogen (H) isotope ratio (δ2H) analyses of plant organic compounds have been applied to assess ecohydrological processes in the environment despite a large part of the δ2H variability observed in plant compounds not being fully elucidated.

We present a conceptual biochemical model based on empirical H isotope data that we generated in two complementary experiments that clarifies a large part of the unexplained variability in the δ2H values of plant organic compounds.

The experiments demonstrate that information recorded in the δ2H values of plant organic compounds goes beyond hydrological signals and can also contain important information on the carbon and energy metabolism of plants. Our model explains where 2H‐fractionations occur in the biosynthesis of plant organic compounds and how these 2H‐fractionations are tightly coupled to a plant's carbon and energy metabolism. Our model also provides a mechanistic basis to introduce H isotopes in plant organic compounds as a new metabolic proxy for the carbon and energy metabolism of plants and ecosystems.

Such a new metabolic proxy has the potential to be applied in a broad range of disciplines, including plant and ecosystem physiology, biogeochemistry and palaeoecology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
alkanes, biomarker, cellulose, hydrogen isotopes, plant metabolism
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145979 (URN)10.1111/nph.15016 (DOI)000428070100011 ()29460486 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Schleucher, J., Wieloch, T., Serk, H., Immerzeel, P., Ehlers, I., Nilsson, M. & Zuidema, P. (2018). Intramolecular stable isotope variation: Consequences for conventional isotope measurements and elucidation of new ecophysiological signals. In: Geophysical Research Abstracts: . Paper presented at EGU General Assembly 2018. , 20, Article ID EGU2018-5511.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intramolecular stable isotope variation: Consequences for conventional isotope measurements and elucidation of new ecophysiological signals
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2018 (English)In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, 2018, Vol. 20, article id EGU2018-5511Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145981 (URN)
Conference
EGU General Assembly 2018
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Wieloch, T., Ehlers, I., Yu, J., Frank, D., Grabner, M., Gessler, A. & Schleucher, J. (2018). Tree-ring cellulose exhibits several interannual 13C signals on the intramolecular level. In: Geophysical Research Abstracts: . Paper presented at EGU General Assembly 2018. , 20, Article ID EGU2018-17509-2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tree-ring cellulose exhibits several interannual 13C signals on the intramolecular level
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2018 (English)In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, 2018, Vol. 20, article id EGU2018-17509-2Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145982 (URN)
Conference
EGU General Assembly 2018
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Segura, J. H., Nilsson, M. B., Haei, M., Sparrman, T., Mikkola, J.-P., Gräsvik, J., . . . Öquist, M. G. (2017). Microbial mineralization of cellulose in frozen soils. Nature Communications, 8(1), Article ID 1154.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial mineralization of cellulose in frozen soils
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2017 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-latitude soils store ~40% of the global soil carbon and experience winters of up to 6 months or more. The winter soil CO2 efflux importantly contributes to the annual CO2 budget. Microorganisms can metabolize short chain carbon compounds in frozen soils. However, soil organic matter (SOM) is dominated by biopolymers, requiring exoenzymatic hydrolysis prior to mineralization. For winter SOM decomposition to have a substantial influence on soil carbon balances it is crucial whether or not biopolymers can be metabolized in frozen soils. We added 13C-labeled cellulose to frozen (−4 °C) mesocosms of boreal forest soil and followed its decomposition. Here we show that cellulose biopolymers are hydrolyzed under frozen conditions sustaining both CO2 production and microbial growth contributing to slow, but persistent, SOM mineralization. Given the long periods with frozen soils at high latitudes these findings are essential for understanding the contribution from winter to the global carbon balance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Nature Publishing Group, 2017
Keywords
organic matter decomposition, unfrozen water content, freeze thaw cycles, forest soil, extracellular enzymes, exoenzyme activity, CO2 production, temperature, carbon, respiration
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141321 (URN)10.1038/s41467-017-01230-y (DOI)000413832800009 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-10-30 Created: 2017-10-30 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Öquist, M. G., Erhagen, B., Haei, M., Sparrman, T., Ilstedt, U., Schleucher, J. & Nilsson, M. B. (2017). The effect of temperature and substrate quality on the carbon use efficiency of saprotrophic decomposition. Plant and Soil, 414(1), 113-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of temperature and substrate quality on the carbon use efficiency of saprotrophic decomposition
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2017 (English)In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 414, no 1, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes a major carbon flux to the atmosphere. The carbon use efficiency (CUE) of the saprotrophic microorganisms mineralizing SOM is integral for soil carbon dynamics. Here we investigate how the CUE is affected by temperature, metabolic conditions, and the molecular complexity of the substrate.

Methods: We incubated O-horizon soil samples (with either 13C–glucose or 13C–cellulose) from a boreal coniferous forest at 4, 9, 14, and 19 °C, and calculated CUEs based on the amount of 13C–CO2and 13C–labelled microbial biomass produced. The effects of substrate, temperature, and metabolic conditions (representing unlimited substrate supply and substrate limitation) on CUE were evaluated.

Results: CUE from metabolizing glucose was higher as compared to cellulose. A slight decrease in CUE with increasing temperature was observed in glucose amended samples (but only in the range 9–19 °C), but not in cellulose amended samples. CUE differed significantly with metabolic conditions, i.e. CUE was higher during unlimited growth conditions as compared to conditions with substrate limitation.

Conclusions: We conclude that it is integral to account for both differences in CUE during different metabolic phases, as well as complexity of substrate, when interpreting temperature dependence on CUE in incubation studies.

Keywords
Carbon use efficiency (CUE), Decomposition, Metabolic condition, NMR 13 C – substrate, Boreal forest soil
National Category
Soil Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129970 (URN)10.1007/s11104-016-3104-x (DOI)000399742000008 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-3060Swedish Research Council, 2012-2855
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wieloch, T., Ehlers, I., Frank, D., Gessler, A., Grabner, M., Yu, J. & Schleucher, J. (2017). Tree-ring cellulose exhibits several distinct intramolecular 13C signals. In: Geophysical Research Abstracts: . Paper presented at EGU General Assembly 2017. , 19, Article ID EGU2017-14723.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tree-ring cellulose exhibits several distinct intramolecular 13C signals
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2017 (English)In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, 2017, Vol. 19, article id EGU2017-14723Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145983 (URN)
Conference
EGU General Assembly 2017
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Soucemarianadin, L. N., Erhagen, B., Nilsson, M. B., Öquist, M. G., Immerzeel, P. & Schleucher, J. (2017). Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy for molecular characterization of soil organic matter: Application to boreal soils and litter. Organic Geochemistry, 113, 184-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy for molecular characterization of soil organic matter: Application to boreal soils and litter
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2017 (English)In: Organic Geochemistry, ISSN 0146-6380, E-ISSN 1873-5290, Vol. 113, p. 184-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organic soils in boreal ecosystems and peatlands represent a huge global carbon pool and their composition strongly affects soil properties. Nevertheless, the characterization of soil organic matter (SOM) molecular composition, which is essential for elucidating soil carbon processes and turnover, is not easily achieved, and further advances in the area are greatly needed. Two dimensional (2D) liquid state H-1-C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used on dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extracts of SOM to achieve molecular level characterization, with signals from many identifiable molecular groups observable. Here we show that a simple and fast sample preparation allows acquisition of 2D H-1-C-13 NMR spectra from extracts of plant litter and organic layers in boreal ecosystems, with fast data acquisition. Our 2D NMR spectra revealed several differences in the DMSO extracts of different tree litter samples, O-horizons of forest soil, peat-forming moss (Sphagnum) and peat. The results mirror established differences between OM in soils and litter of different forest ecosystems (e.g. between deciduous and coniferous litter) but also provide indications for research to untangle previously conflicting results (e.g. cutin degradation in soil or carbohydrate degradation in peat). Thus, combination of 2D NMR methods can greatly improve analysis of litter composition and SOM composition, thereby facilitating the elucidation of their roles in biogeochemical and ecological processes that are critical for foreseeing feedback mechanisms for SOM turnover as a result of global environmental change.

Keywords
Soil organic matter, Molecular characterization, DMSO-extracts, 2D NMR, HSQC, Carbon inputs, gnin, Polysaccharides
National Category
Soil Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142252 (URN)10.1016/j.orggeochem.2017.06.019 (DOI)000414812800018 ()
Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ehlers, I., Augusti, A., Köhler, I., Wieloch, T., Zuidema, P., Robertson, I., . . . Schleucher, J. (2016). Detecting plant-climate interactions over decades-millennia using NMR isotopomer analysis. In: Geophysical Research Abstracts: . Paper presented at EGU General Assembly 2016. , 18, Article ID EGU2016-9141-2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detecting plant-climate interactions over decades-millennia using NMR isotopomer analysis
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2016 (English)In: Geophysical Research Abstracts, 2016, Vol. 18, article id EGU2016-9141-2Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145985 (URN)
Conference
EGU General Assembly 2016
Available from: 2018-03-24 Created: 2018-03-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Spahr, S., Bolotin, J., Schleucher, J., Ehlers, I., von Gunten, U. & Hofstetter, T. B. (2015). Compound-specific carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotope analysis of N-nitrosodimethylamine in aqueous solutions. Analytical Chemistry, 87(5), 2916-2924
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Compound-specific carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotope analysis of N-nitrosodimethylamine in aqueous solutions
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2015 (English)In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 87, no 5, p. 2916-2924Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mitigation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and other hazardous water disinfection byproducts (DBP) is currently hampered by a limited understanding of DBP formation mechanisms. Because variations of the stable isotope composition of NDMA can potentially reveal reaction pathways and precursor compounds, we developed a method for the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of (13)C/(12)C, (15)N/(14)N, and (2)H/(1)H ratios of NDMA by gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). Method quantification limits for the accurate isotope analysis of NDMA, N-nitrosodiethyl-, -dipropyl-, and -dibutylamine as well as N-nitrosopyrrolidine were between 0.18 to 0.60 nmol C, 0.40 to 0.80 nmol N, and 2.2 to 5.8 nmol H injected on column. Coupling solid phase extraction (SPE) to GC/IRMS enabled the precise quantification of C, N, and H isotope ratios of NDMA in aqueous samples at concentrations of 0.6 μM (45 μg L(-1)). We validated the proposed method with a laboratory experiment, in which NDMA was formed with stoichiometric yield (97 ± 4%) through chloramination of the pharmaceutical ranitidine (3 μM). δ(13)C and δ(2)H values of NDMA remained constant during NDMA formation while its δ(15)N increased due to a reaction at a N atom in the rate-limiting step of NDMA formation. The δ(2)H value of NDMA determined by SPE-GC/IRMS also corresponded well to the δ(2)H value of the N(CH3)2-group of ranitidine measured by quantitative deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This observation implies that the N(CH3)2-moiety of ranitidine is transferred to NDMA without being chemically altered and illustrates the accuracy of the proposed method.

National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101104 (URN)10.1021/ac5044169 (DOI)000350611700057 ()25621380 (PubMedID)
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form, with the title "Compound-Specific Carbon, Nitrogen, and Hydrogen Isotope Analysis of N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in Aqueous Solutions"

Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ehlers, I., Augusti, A., Betson, T. R., Nilsson, M. B., Marshall, J. D. & Schleucher, J. (2015). Detecting long-term metabolic shifts using isotopomers: CO2-driven suppression of photorespiration in C-3 plants over the 20th century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(51), 15585-15590
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detecting long-term metabolic shifts using isotopomers: CO2-driven suppression of photorespiration in C-3 plants over the 20th century
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2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 51, p. 15585-15590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Terrestrial vegetation currently absorbs approximately a third of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, mitigating the rise of atmospheric CO2. However, terrestrial net primary production is highly sensitive to atmospheric CO2 levels and associated climatic changes. In C-3 plants, which dominate terrestrial vegetation, net photosynthesis depends on the ratio between photorespiration and gross photosynthesis. This metabolic flux ratio depends strongly on CO2 levels, but changes in this ratio over the past CO2 rise have not been analyzed experimentally. Combining CO2 manipulation experiments and deuterium NMR, we first establish that the intramolecular deuterium distribution (deuterium isotopomers) of photosynthetic C-3 glucose contains a signal of the photorespiration/photosynthesis ratio. By tracing this isotopomer signal in herbarium samples of natural C-3 vascular plant species, crops, and a Sphagnum moss species, we detect a consistent reduction in the photorespiration/photosynthesis ratio in response to the similar to 100-ppm CO2 increase between similar to 1900 and 2013. No difference was detected in the isotopomer trends between beet sugar samples covering the 20th century and CO2 manipulation experiments, suggesting that photosynthetic metabolism in sugar beet has not acclimated to increasing CO2 over >100 y. This provides observational evidence that the reduction of the photorespiration/photosynthesis ratio was ca. 25%. The Sphagnum results are consistent with the observed positive correlations between peat accumulation rates and photosynthetic rates over the Northern Hemisphere. Our results establish that isotopomers of plant archives contain metabolic information covering centuries. Our data provide direct quantitative information on the "CO2 fertilization" effect over decades, thus addressing a major uncertainty in Earth system models.

Keywords
isotopomer, acclimation, deuterium, CO2 fertilization, atmospheric change
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114013 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1504493112 (DOI)000366916000036 ()26644588 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-21 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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