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Lundström, Ragnar
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Lundström, R. (2018). Greening transport in Sweden: the role of the organic intellectual in changing union climate change policy. Globalizations, 15(4), 536-549
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Greening transport in Sweden: the role of the organic intellectual in changing union climate change policy
2018 (English)In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 536-549Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article engages with the role of the individual in transforming union organizations by discussing the experiences of Ulf Jarnefjord and his efforts to introduce climate change policies into the Swedish Transport Workers’ Union [Transportarbetareförbundet]. Research investigating the integration of climate change policies into the agenda of Swedish trade unions has identified a disconnect between policy development among leaders on the one hand, and engagement among members on the other. Employing the life-history interview method, and the analytical concept of ‘organic intellectual’, this article focusses on the ways in which Ulf, as a regional health and safety officer, has experienced engaging with climate change issues in relation to both members and the leadership of his union. His experiences point to the importance of learning about how climate change and production impact on the everyday lives of members for developing and mobilizing support for climate change policies in unions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
Keywords
Trade unions, Sweden, climate change, life history interview, organic intellectuals, technological fix
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-149175 (URN)10.1080/14747731.2018.1454677 (DOI)000430500900007 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-06-16 Created: 2018-06-16 Last updated: 2018-10-01Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R. (2018). Spaces for support: Discursive negotiations of supporter positions in online forum discussions about suicide. Discourse, Context & Media, 25, 98-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spaces for support: Discursive negotiations of supporter positions in online forum discussions about suicide
2018 (English)In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 25, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates self-organized peer-to-peer support in online forum discussions about suicide. It analyzes how the discursive strategies through which participants introduce themselves as supporters relate to the support they provide. The analysis shows that the strategies employed to construct supporter identities commonly draw on what has been described as 'somatic individuality' - by which the management of biological 'risks' are framed as individual responsibilities - and by negotiating tensions between different perspectives on suicide. These are; (a) a discourse focusing on psychiatric knowledge and psychopharmaceuticals (b) a discourse focusing on social context and personal relationships, and (c) a critical stance towards the established care system. Negotiations between these condition, and are also conditioned by, power relations in the forum. These dynamics regulate the ways in which participants can use an online forum in order to move away from crisis points by discursively attempting to enter a supporter position. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Suicide, Social support, Online support, Peer support, Discursive psychology
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152878 (URN)10.1016/j.dcm.2018.04.002 (DOI)000446287100012 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-10-31 Created: 2018-10-31 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R. (2017). Going green - turning labor: a qualitative analysis of the approaches of Union officials Working with environmental issues in Sweden and the United Kingdom. Labor Studies Journal, 42(3), 180-199
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Going green - turning labor: a qualitative analysis of the approaches of Union officials Working with environmental issues in Sweden and the United Kingdom
2017 (English)In: Labor Studies Journal, ISSN 0160-449X, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 180-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What conditions shape the introduction of climate change issues into trade union organizations? This article analyzes life-history interviews with two union organization leaders working with climate issues—one in Sweden and one in the United Kingdom—discussing how their individual backgrounds, as well as the different organizational and national contexts in which they work, create different conditions and strategies for developing an environmental union agenda. The analysis discusses how the strategies of the Scandinavian leader focus on policy development, and compares this with how the U.K. union leader focuses primarily on the interests of, and conflicts with, members when integrating climate change in their respective organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
trade unions, climate change, environment, life-history interviews, union leadership
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146617 (URN)10.1177/0160449X17704054 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-04-13 Created: 2018-04-13 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R. (2016). Secondary victimization and the collective identity of crime victims: A qualitative analysis of Swedish crime news discourse. Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, 17(1), 36-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Secondary victimization and the collective identity of crime victims: A qualitative analysis of Swedish crime news discourse
2016 (English)In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 36-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents an analysis of how secondary victims of murder—in this context, the parents or close family members of a primary murder victim—are represented in Swedish crime news discourse. The study is based on a discourse analysis of media coverage of secondary victims, and statements made by them, in relation to four highly publicized murder cases during the last two decades. The analysis shows that portrayals of secondary victimization reinforce the conflictual character of victim–offender relationships in the news, but also limit the conditions for talking about the significance of social support, mediation and reconciliation for crime victims. News representations of crime victims become less clearly marked by the characteristics of the ‘ideal’ victim as secondary victims, and persons who are explicitly critical toward the legal system, claim victimhood. Furthermore, the identity of the crime victims’ movement as a collective becomes destabilized when the category of the victim is widened to include individuals whose interests are framed as subjective, rather than related to the needs of other crime victims or the general public. In sum, increased media focus on secondary victims may thus undermine the legitimacy of victim claims in public discourse.

Keywords
Crime victims, victimization, secondary victims, discourse analysis, crime journalism
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146618 (URN)10.1080/14043858.2016.1161941 (DOI)2-s2.0-84988443622 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-13 Created: 2018-04-13 Last updated: 2018-10-18Bibliographically approved
Dahlberg-Grundberg, M., Lundström, R. & Lindgren, S. (2016). Social Media and the Transnationalization of Mass Activism: Twitter and the labour movement. First Monday, 21(8)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Media and the Transnationalization of Mass Activism: Twitter and the labour movement
2016 (English)In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 21, no 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the labour movement organization LabourStart, a digital initiative that, by various means such as e-mail campaigns and social media use, seeks to promote workers’ rights and to strengthen the labour movement on a global scale. The main aim of this study is to analyse a) how LabourStart employs Twitter for communication and organisation and b) how the Twitter-sphere that LabourStart constitutes — and is constituted by — is geographically structured. Our dataset consisted of all tweets containing the word “labourstart” and all tweets coming from or addressing any LabourStart–related account during the period 2008–2015. As theoretical points of departure, the notions of transnationalization/translocalism were used, in part together with the concept of connective action, to conceptualise the research. In terms of methodology, network analysis was the main approach employed to obtain and visualise the findings. Our results indicate that LabourStart’s Twitter use does not seem to have had any effects in terms of creating a decentralised transnational movement with translocal traits, thus suggesting that LabourStart has failed to fully make use of the connective features of Twitter and to establish a decentralized, transnational union movement. This, we suggest, is to some extent caused by LabourStart’s centralized organizational — and thus communicational — structure. In the concluding section, we interpret our findings in broader terms relating to the context and history of labour movements, and we discuss LabourStart’s work in relation to local and global worker issues.

National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114439 (URN)10.5210/fm.v21i8.6729 (DOI)
Note

Orginally published in manuscript form with title: Social Media and the Transnationalization of Mass Activism: Twitter and Trade Union Revitalization

Available from: 2016-01-19 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R., Räthzel, N. & Uzzell, D. (2015). Disconnected spaces: introducing environmental perspectives into the trade union agendatop-down and bottom-up. Environmental Sociology, 1(3), 166-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disconnected spaces: introducing environmental perspectives into the trade union agendatop-down and bottom-up
2015 (English)In: Environmental Sociology, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 166-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article compares how visions for integrating environmental issues into the union agenda are articulated from two different positions in the Swedish Trade Union Confederation (LO). The article is based on an analysis of ‘life history interviews’ and directs attention to the biographical circumstances under which individuals are able to work with environmental issues in unions. The analysis shows that the conditions for integrating environmental issues are weakened by the hierarchical culture of the organisation and by high levels of institutionalisation. LO furthermore lacks routines for mobilising the interests of environmental enthusiasts, and being positioned at headquarters hampers the abilities of union officials to mobilise environmental interests among members. Comparing the experiences from Sweden with the case of Comisiones Obreras (CCOO) in Spain shows that success depends on a relationship between individual engagement and political. Union transformation is contingent on developing issues that connect the immediate interests of workers with their long-term interests as citizens, such that a new workers’ identity can develop and lead to practices that overcome the ‘metabolic rift’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
trade unions; environment; life history interview; organic intellectuals; Sweden; Spain
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-105033 (URN)10.1080/23251042.2015.1041212 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-06-17 Created: 2015-06-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Räthzel, N., Uzzell, D., Lundström, R. & Leandro, B. A. (2015). The Space of Civil Society and the Practices of Resistance and Subordination. Journal of Civil Society, 11(2), 154-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Space of Civil Society and the Practices of Resistance and Subordination
2015 (English)In: Journal of Civil Society, ISSN 1744-8689, E-ISSN 1744-8697, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 154-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We argue that the majority of civil society conceptualizations employ a narrow concept of the state and a narrow concept of civil society. The life history of a Brazilian woman demonstrates that as individuals travel through state institutions and civil society organizations (CSOs), they carry conflicting worldviews with them which bear on the practices of CSOs. With Gramsci we recognize civil society as a space where movements and the state struggle for hegemony; beyond him we conceptualize CSOs as contradictory, being simultaneously of and against the state, while the state is simultaneously outside and within them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
State vs. civil society, life history, liberation theology, gender relations, circulating power relations
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-105025 (URN)10.1080/17448689.2015.1045699 (DOI)000219470200004 ()
Available from: 2015-06-17 Created: 2015-06-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R. (2013). Framing fraud: Discourse on benefit cheating in Sweden and the UK. European Journal of Communication, 28(6), 630-645
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Framing fraud: Discourse on benefit cheating in Sweden and the UK
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 630-645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyses discourse on benefit fraud in Swedish and British newspapers. It furthermore compares discourse on fraud in newspapers and political blogs in the two countries. In Sweden, fraud is primarily articulated as a collective social problem in policy discussions related to the health insurance programme. In the UK, it is often articulated employing strategies commonly associated with crime news narratives, and centred on images of individual cheaters. The main result of the analysis presented here is that these observed differences between British and Swedish media representations are related to the ways in which the relationship between the welfare state and the citizens traditionally have been constructed in liberal and social democratic contexts respectively. Political attempts to highlight the issue of benefit fraud, and dominant media representations of such attempts, must therefore be understood not as attempts to combat fraud, but rather as attempts to delegitimize the more general aim and purpose of the welfare state. They challenge the deservingness of welfare recipients in general, not just the ones that cheat, and they thereby transform the conditions for public trust in the welfare state. News discourse on fraud in both countries establishes a neoliberal, financialized and individualized notion of welfare dependency, through which the relationship between social and structural circumstances on the one hand, and poverty, exclusion and inequality on the other, become blurred. The comparison of newspapers and blogs suggests that although dominant media representations are contested through citizen-created journalism in both contexts, they also limit the conditions for discursive struggles over the issue of benefit fraud significantly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2013
Keywords
benefit fraud, benefit cheating, news, discourse analysis, content analysis, bidragsfusk, nyheter, diskursanalys, innehållsanalys
National Category
Media Studies Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology; medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80471 (URN)10.1177/0267323113502737 (DOI)000328498100002 ()
Available from: 2013-09-18 Created: 2013-09-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R. (2013). Social support online: between closeness and anonymity. In: Simon Lindgren (Ed.), Hybrid media culture: sensing place in a world of flows (pp. 106-122). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social support online: between closeness and anonymity
2013 (English)In: Hybrid media culture: sensing place in a world of flows / [ed] Simon Lindgren, London: Routledge, 2013, p. 106-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2013
Series
Routledge advances in sociology ; 114
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144367 (URN)9780415824071 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-02-01 Created: 2018-02-01 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lundström, R. (2012). Medborgares egna nyhetsberättelser (1ed.). In: Simon Lindgren (Ed.), Nya medier och kommunikation: Makt och meningsskapande i den digitala tidsåldern (pp. 71-86). Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Medborgares egna nyhetsberättelser
2012 (Swedish)In: Nya medier och kommunikation: Makt och meningsskapande i den digitala tidsåldern / [ed] Simon Lindgren, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2012, 1, p. 71-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2012 Edition: 1
Keywords
citizen journalism, news journalism, welfare debate, medborgarjournalistik, nyhetsjournailsm, välfärdsdebatt
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67874 (URN)9789140681515 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-04-06 Created: 2013-04-06 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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