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Tieva, Åse
Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Bergström, P., Rönnlund, M. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Making the shift from the traditional classroom to the active learning classroom: possibilities and challenge. In: Fjärde nationella konferensen i pedagogiskt arbete i Umeå 19-20 augusti 2019: Abstractbok. Paper presented at Fjärde nationella konferensen i pedagogiskt arbete, Umeå, Sverige, 19–20 augusti, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making the shift from the traditional classroom to the active learning classroom: possibilities and challenge
2019 (English)In: Fjärde nationella konferensen i pedagogiskt arbete i Umeå 19-20 augusti 2019: Abstractbok, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper reports on a case study of a school development project in a Swedish upper secondary school. The project initiators (three teachers), wanted to change their teaching towards student active learning, and as part of that change they designed and prepared a classroom inspired by the Active Learning Classroom model (Baepler et al. 2016). The aim was to increase the understanding of possibilities and challenges when changing the pedagogical practice. The research questions addressed: What characterise the pedagogical practices in the traditional vs newly designed classroom in terms of communication and interaction between teachers and students, and what characterises the pedagogical change? A participatory design-based research (DBR) methodology was applied in three phases: the exploration phase, the development phase and the evaluation phase. This paper focus on a selected sequence of three months of the development phase, exploring teaching in the shift from the traditional classroom to the ALC. The analysis draws on a) video and audio recorded observations of lessons (N=15) in the traditional classroom and in the newly designed classroom, b) teachers’ individual evaluations of lessons based on pre-formulated reflective questions, and c) focus group discussions (N=3) on the topic ‘teaching for students’ active learning’.  The data was analysed using Bernstein’s concepts of classification and framing (2000). Preliminary results indicate variations in outcome of pedagogical change depending on how the teachers worked in the traditional classroom. For example, when the students were unaware of working in groups and using digital facilities collectively, this led to challenges in the active learning classroom.

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163629 (URN)
Conference
Fjärde nationella konferensen i pedagogiskt arbete, Umeå, Sverige, 19–20 augusti, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Bergström, P. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Rum för aktivt lärande: Från design till praktik. In: : . Paper presented at Resultatdialog 2019, Göteborg, 3-4 december, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rum för aktivt lärande: Från design till praktik
2019 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167406 (URN)
Conference
Resultatdialog 2019, Göteborg, 3-4 december, 2019
Available from: 2020-01-18 Created: 2020-01-18 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Bergström, P. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design.. In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world. Paper presented at NERA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design.
2019 (English)In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a case study of trends and transitions in the context of Nordic school design. The aim is to explore how local stakeholders in Sweden (principals, school leaders and architects) involved in school building projects envision a ‘good’ learning environment and what perceptions of teaching and learning that underlie their visions. By including various groups of stakeholders, we also aim at exploring how their views relate to each other. Drawn on the results, we discuss their ideas in relation to wider discourses on teaching and learning in late modern society with focus on local – global transitions.

The study draws on a relational understanding of space (Massey 2005; McGregor 2004), and the idea that physical, social and pedagogical dimensions of learning space are generated together and continuously in process. Furthermore, we understand learning spaces as areas where power relations, control and agency are performed. In line with this understanding the analysis draws on Bernstein’s concepts ‘classification’ and ‘framing’ (Bernstein 2000).

We conducted semi-structured interviews with stakeholders at different levels (municipality level, school level) involved in projects concerning construction and reconstruction of school buildings. At the level of municipalities, interviews where held with 8 officials/school leaders and 3 architects. At the school level, interviews where held with 9 principals (n 20). Interview data was analysed inspired by Critical Discourse Analysis as advocated by Wodac and Fairclough (1997).

We identified two main discourses about how learning space shall be constituted, that differed in terms of classification. One which celebrated clear boundaries and separations between different places/localities, i.e. strong classification in physical space, and one which celebrated more blurred boundaries and separations in physical space, i.e. weak classification between localities. Furthermore, the framing came in different forms in the two discourses - more strong framing of student-teacher relations and communication in the first discourse and more weak framing in the second discourse. Thus, strongly classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) strong framing of communication and behaviour (clear and explicit rules and principles for classroom practices), and weak classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) more weak framing of practices (the rules and principles for learning being merely implicit). No matter of what discourse or profession they represented, the stakeholders advocated a pedagogical approach directed towards ‘active’ learning and saw the student as an ‘active learner‘.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156827 (URN)
Conference
NERA
Available from: 2019-02-28 Created: 2019-02-28 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Bergström, P. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design. In: NERA 2019: Abstract book. Paper presented at NERA 2019, Uppsala, Sweden, March 6-8, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design
2019 (English)In: NERA 2019: Abstract book, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a case study of trends and transitions in the context of Nordic school design. The aim is to explore how local stakeholders in Sweden (principals, school leaders and architects) involved in school building projects envision a ‘good’ learning environment and what perceptions of teaching and learning that underlie their visions. By including various groups of 954 stakeholders, we also aim at exploring how their views relate to each other. Drawn on the results, we discuss their ideas in relation to wider discourses on teaching and learning in late modern society with focus on local – global transitions.

The study draws on a relational understanding of space (Massey 2005; McGregor 2004), and the idea that physical, social and pedagogical dimensions of learning space are generated together and continuously in process. Furthermore, we understand learning spaces as areas where power relations, control and agency are performed. In line with this understanding the analysis draws on Bernstein’s concepts ‘classification’ and ‘framing’ (Bernstein 2000).

We conducted semi-structured interviews with stakeholders at different levels (municipality level, school level) involved in projects concerning construction and reconstruction of school buildings. At the level of municipalities, interviews where held with 8 officials/school leaders and 3 architects. At the school level, interviews where held with 9 principals (n 20). Interview data was analysed inspired by Critical Discourse Analysis as advocated by Wodac and Fairclough (1997).

We identified two main discourses about how learning space shall be constituted, that differed in terms of classification. One which celebrated clear boundaries and separations between different places/localities, i.e. strong classification in physical space, and one which celebrated more blurred boundaries and separations in physical space, i.e. weak classification between localities. Furthermore, the framing came in different forms in the two discourses - more strong framing of student-teacher relations and communication in the first discourse and more weak framing in the second discourse. Thus, strongly classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) strong framing of communication and behaviour (clear and explicit rules and principles for classroom practices), and weak classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) more weak framing of practices (the rules and principles for learning being merely implicit). No matter of what discourse or profession they represented, the stakeholders advocated a pedagogical approach directed towards ‘active’ learning and saw the student as an ‘active learner‘.

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167404 (URN)
Conference
NERA 2019, Uppsala, Sweden, March 6-8, 2019
Available from: 2020-01-18 Created: 2020-01-18 Last updated: 2020-01-20Bibliographically approved
Leijon, M., Tieva, Å., Nilsson, A. & Malvebo, E. (2019). Teachers designing teaching in flexible higher education learning spaces. In: Transitions 19 Presentations: . Paper presented at Transitions 19 - Innovative learning environments and teacher change, Melbourne, Australia, October 2-4, 2019. Innovative Learning Environments and Teacher Change (iletc)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers designing teaching in flexible higher education learning spaces
2019 (English)In: Transitions 19 Presentations, Innovative Learning Environments and Teacher Change (iletc) , 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective: Recently, the interest in spaces for learning in higher education (HE) has grown consider­ably in Sweden and several universities have invested in flexible learning spaces. Much inspiration comes from Australian ideas on innovative learning environments (ILEs) (Imms, 2018). There is a growing body of research that shows how teachers develop their pedagogy in innovative and flexible environments (see for example Byers & Imms, 2016). However, there is still a lack of studies with focus on learning spaces and teaching in higher education. This paper presents an ongoing research project on teacher didactic design in flexible higher education learning spaces. The aim is to describe teacher conceptions of teaching in flexible learning spaces. How do teachers design teaching? Do they experience changes on their beliefs about teaching and learning?

Research methodology: Tentative results from interviews with twenty teachers, new to teaching in flexible spaces at six Swedish Universities, will be presented. A deductive qualitative content analysis was used. The group of researchers coded individually with a high intercoder reliability (Schreier, 2012). The final categories were: teaching, teacher role, students and spatial aspects. The research draws upon a designoriented perspective called ‘Designs for Learning’ (Selander & Kress, 2010; Leijon, 2016). Designs for learning concerns framing and conditions for learning, while designs in learning highlights how a teacher makes use of space during teaching.

Results and findings: Teachers new to teaching in flexible learning spaces concentrates on designs for learning, like technology, support, both technical and pedagogical, booking systems and so on. However, some of the teachers have transformed their pedagogic ideas and didactic design and moved in to new territories. The teachers are beginning to incorporate the flexible learning space as a part of their teaching repertoire, as part of their designs in learning.

Discussion of significance: What prompts the teachers to change their praxis? What hinders them? What part does the flexible learning space play? How can didactic design in flexible learning spaces be a part of a teacher repertoire? Can the tentative concept “spatial didactic design” be used to frame a complex relation between learning spaces and teaching?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Innovative Learning Environments and Teacher Change (iletc), 2019
Series
Abstractbok
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166405 (URN)
Conference
Transitions 19 - Innovative learning environments and teacher change, Melbourne, Australia, October 2-4, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Bergström, P. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Teaching for Active Learning in relation to Design and Use of Physical and Digital Space. In: ECER 2019 - European Conference on Educational Research, Hamburg, Germany 3-6 September, 2019: Education in an Era of Risk: the Role of Educational Research for the Future. Paper presented at ECER 2019 - European Conference on Educational Research, Hamburg, Germany, 3-6 September, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching for Active Learning in relation to Design and Use of Physical and Digital Space
2019 (English)In: ECER 2019 - European Conference on Educational Research, Hamburg, Germany 3-6 September, 2019: Education in an Era of Risk: the Role of Educational Research for the Future, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Educational practices are influenced by a complex interaction between different factors of school life and changes in the physical environment can affect teaching practices in different directions (e.g. (Blackmore et al., 2011; Gislason, 2010; Grannäs & Frelin, 2017; Sigurðardóttir & Hjartarson 2016; Stadler-Altmann 2016; Veloso et al 2014; Woolner & Uline, 2019). With this as a starting point, this paper reports on a case study of a school development project in a Swedish upper secondary school. The project initiators (three teachers), wanted to change their teaching to become more student activity based, and as part of that change they designed and prepared a classroom inspired by the Active Learning Classroom (ALC) model (Baepler et al. 2016). In line with the ALC model, they furnished the classroom with round tables for groups of students, access to whiteboards, and digital facilities i.e. smartboards, interactive pens, projectors, and student laptop access. Hence, a design that implies collaborative work, communication and intense interaction. We employed a participatory design-based research (DBR) methodology to study the teachers’ school development project, concentrating on three phases: the exploration phase, the development phase and the evaluation phase (Holmberg, 2019). This paper focus on a selected sequence of three months of the development phase, exploring teaching in the shift from the traditional classroom to the active learning classroom with regard to possibilities and challenges for students’ active learning. The questions addressed are: What characterize the pedagogical practices in the traditional vs. newly designed classroom in terms of communication and interaction? What characterizes the pedagogical change? The analysis draws on a) video and audio recorded observations of lessons (N=15) in the traditional classroom and in the newly designed classroom, b) teachers’ individual evaluations of lessons based on pre-formulated reflective questions, and c) focus group discussions (N=3) on the topic ‘teaching for students’ active learning’. The data was analyzed using Bernstein’s concepts classification and framing (2000). Preliminary results indicate variations in outcome of pedagogical change depending on how the teachers worked in the traditional classroom. For example, when the students were unaware of working in groups and using digital facilities collectively, this led to challenges in the active learning classroom.

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163628 (URN)
Conference
ECER 2019 - European Conference on Educational Research, Hamburg, Germany, 3-6 September, 2019
Note

This paper was part of the symposium "Digital Learning Spaces: Hopes and Risks".

Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Rönnlund, M., Bergström, P. & Tieva, Å. (2019). The implementation and practice of ALC: A Swedish case study. In: Transitions 19 Presentations: . Paper presented at Transitions 19 Innovative learning environemnts and teacher change, Melbourne, Australia, October 2-4, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The implementation and practice of ALC: A Swedish case study
2019 (English)In: Transitions 19 Presentations, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Drawing on data from a Swedish participatory design-based study, this paper discusses the implementation of Active Learning Classrooms (ALC) in an upper-secondary school context. The main question in focus is: How did the teachers experience teaching in ALC in relation to the students’ ‘active learning’? Analysis of findings revealed four themes that are discussed in relation to a conceptual framework that brings together different aspects of educational practice, namely material, organisational, cultural and social aspects. The advantages of teaching in ALC were related to what was experienced by teachers as more focused collaborative work among the students and to the fact that activities and learning were based more on the students’ own thoughts and experiences than in the ordinary classroom. Challenges were related to composing groups where individual students could work well together and to keeping students working for long sessions.

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166377 (URN)
Conference
Transitions 19 Innovative learning environemnts and teacher change, Melbourne, Australia, October 2-4, 2019
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, L., Gruffman-Cruse, E., Malmros, B., Sundbaum, A.-C. & Tieva, Å. (2018). Catching sight of students´ learning: a matter of space?. In: Core meets E-LAW: Innovation in Higher Education. Paper presented at CORE Conference, Hochschule Heidelberg, Germany, November 30 and December 1, 2017. Heidelberg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catching sight of students´ learning: a matter of space?
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2018 (English)In: Core meets E-LAW: Innovation in Higher Education, Heidelberg, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Based on a two-year study of a development project aiming to enhance students ́ learning in a natural science course by making their understanding more visible to themselves and their teachers, this paper analyzes the role of physical space in this context. Data were collected through systematic observations, photo and film documentation, student surveys, interviews with students and teachers, and also from students ́ examination results over an extended period. Previously, the course used traditional teaching methods and spaces. The students found the contents difficult, and the average examination results were poor. The teachers developed more student-active working methods, challenging students to make their understanding visible. However, the course literature and type of examination tasks remained unchanged, allowing for comparisons over time. The instruction took place in a large, innovative "flex-room", equipped with touchscreens, whiteboards, highly accessible technology and flexible furniture, allowing for increased student communication and feedback. The teachers could interact with student groups in the same room, spot and quickly correct misunderstandings in student presentations. The students ́ examination results improved considerably. They argued that the work methods contributed to deeper understanding and improved retention of the course contents. Finally, few observed space-related time-losses occurred. We conclude that well-designed spaces were crucial preconditions to enable these positive results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg: , 2018
Keywords
learning, understanding, space, higher education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147911 (URN)
Conference
CORE Conference, Hochschule Heidelberg, Germany, November 30 and December 1, 2017
Projects
Rum för lärande
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, L., Gruffman-Cruse, E., Malmros, B., Sundbaum, A.-C. & Tieva, Å. (2017). Pedagogisk rum-tid och strategier för aktivt lärande i högre utbildning. Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, 11(1), 16-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedagogisk rum-tid och strategier för aktivt lärande i högre utbildning
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2017 (Swedish)In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 16-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The design of formal learning spaces in higher education has almost been a non-issue until recently, when the interest has increased considerably, both in Sweden and internationally. Hitherto, the close connection between space and time has been rather unnoticed in this context. The article aims at deepening the knowledge on the relationship between space, time, teaching and learning in higher education. Especially it highlights teachers´ possibilities, or lack thereof, to promote students´ understanding of curricular content under varying spatial and temporal conditions. The article describes and analyses two empirical studies, including five undergraduate courses framed by different combinations of time-space conditions. The analysis rested on extensive data: systematic observations, student surveys, interviews of students and teachers, and in one of the studies, examination results for a longer timeperiod. We found that multi-functional learning spaces where both students and teachers could engage in presentations, communication and use of digital resources enabled teaching for student active learning, thus promoting understanding and improved examination results. This however presupposed that teachers initially got educational support and additional time for planning. Good spatial preconditions also reduced space-related time-losses and disruptions of teaching and learning considerably, which is particularly important when the teacher-led time is sparse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skövde: Högskolan i Skövde, 2017
Keywords
rum, rumsliga ramar, tidsramar, högre utbildning, studentaktiv undervisning
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143436 (URN)
Projects
Rum för lärande
Available from: 2017-12-28 Created: 2017-12-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ahlgren, R., Malmros, B., Sjödin, A. & Tieva, Å. (2015). Att bryta en trend och förändra en tradition. In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015: Gränslös kunskap. Paper presented at Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015, Gränslös kunskap, Umeå, 8-9 oktober 2015 (pp. 6-7). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att bryta en trend och förändra en tradition
2015 (Swedish)In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015: Gränslös kunskap, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2015, p. 6-7Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2015
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114102 (URN)
Conference
Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015, Gränslös kunskap, Umeå, 8-9 oktober 2015
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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