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Tieva, Åse
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Rönnlund, M., Bergström, P. & Tieva, Å. (2019). Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design.. In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world. Paper presented at NERA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design.
2019 (English)In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world, 2019Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a case study of trends and transitions in the context of Nordic school design. The aim is to explore how local stakeholders in Sweden (principals, school leaders and architects) involved in school building projects envision a ‘good’ learning environment and what perceptions of teaching and learning that underlie their visions. By including various groups of stakeholders, we also aim at exploring how their views relate to each other. Drawn on the results, we discuss their ideas in relation to wider discourses on teaching and learning in late modern society with focus on local – global transitions.

The study draws on a relational understanding of space (Massey 2005; McGregor 2004), and the idea that physical, social and pedagogical dimensions of learning space are generated together and continuously in process. Furthermore, we understand learning spaces as areas where power relations, control and agency are performed. In line with this understanding the analysis draws on Bernstein’s concepts ‘classification’ and ‘framing’ (Bernstein 2000).

We conducted semi-structured interviews with stakeholders at different levels (municipality level, school level) involved in projects concerning construction and reconstruction of school buildings. At the level of municipalities, interviews where held with 8 officials/school leaders and 3 architects. At the school level, interviews where held with 9 principals (n 20). Interview data was analysed inspired by Critical Discourse Analysis as advocated by Wodac and Fairclough (1997).

We identified two main discourses about how learning space shall be constituted, that differed in terms of classification. One which celebrated clear boundaries and separations between different places/localities, i.e. strong classification in physical space, and one which celebrated more blurred boundaries and separations in physical space, i.e. weak classification between localities. Furthermore, the framing came in different forms in the two discourses - more strong framing of student-teacher relations and communication in the first discourse and more weak framing in the second discourse. Thus, strongly classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) strong framing of communication and behaviour (clear and explicit rules and principles for classroom practices), and weak classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) more weak framing of practices (the rules and principles for learning being merely implicit). No matter of what discourse or profession they represented, the stakeholders advocated a pedagogical approach directed towards ‘active’ learning and saw the student as an ‘active learner‘.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156827 (URN)
Conference
NERA
Available from: 2019-02-28 Created: 2019-02-28 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, L., Gruffman-Cruse, E., Malmros, B., Sundbaum, A.-C. & Tieva, Å. (2018). Catching sight of students´ learning: a matter of space?. In: Core meets E-LAW: Innovation in Higher Education. Paper presented at CORE Conference, Hochschule Heidelberg, Germany, November 30 and December 1, 2017. Heidelberg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catching sight of students´ learning: a matter of space?
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2018 (English)In: Core meets E-LAW: Innovation in Higher Education, Heidelberg, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Based on a two-year study of a development project aiming to enhance students ́ learning in a natural science course by making their understanding more visible to themselves and their teachers, this paper analyzes the role of physical space in this context. Data were collected through systematic observations, photo and film documentation, student surveys, interviews with students and teachers, and also from students ́ examination results over an extended period. Previously, the course used traditional teaching methods and spaces. The students found the contents difficult, and the average examination results were poor. The teachers developed more student-active working methods, challenging students to make their understanding visible. However, the course literature and type of examination tasks remained unchanged, allowing for comparisons over time. The instruction took place in a large, innovative "flex-room", equipped with touchscreens, whiteboards, highly accessible technology and flexible furniture, allowing for increased student communication and feedback. The teachers could interact with student groups in the same room, spot and quickly correct misunderstandings in student presentations. The students ́ examination results improved considerably. They argued that the work methods contributed to deeper understanding and improved retention of the course contents. Finally, few observed space-related time-losses occurred. We conclude that well-designed spaces were crucial preconditions to enable these positive results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Heidelberg: , 2018
Keywords
learning, understanding, space, higher education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147911 (URN)
Conference
CORE Conference, Hochschule Heidelberg, Germany, November 30 and December 1, 2017
Projects
Rum för lärande
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Lundahl, L., Gruffman-Cruse, E., Malmros, B., Sundbaum, A.-C. & Tieva, Å. (2017). Pedagogisk rum-tid och strategier för aktivt lärande i högre utbildning. Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, 11(1), 16-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedagogisk rum-tid och strategier för aktivt lärande i högre utbildning
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2017 (Swedish)In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 16-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The design of formal learning spaces in higher education has almost been a non-issue until recently, when the interest has increased considerably, both in Sweden and internationally. Hitherto, the close connection between space and time has been rather unnoticed in this context. The article aims at deepening the knowledge on the relationship between space, time, teaching and learning in higher education. Especially it highlights teachers´ possibilities, or lack thereof, to promote students´ understanding of curricular content under varying spatial and temporal conditions. The article describes and analyses two empirical studies, including five undergraduate courses framed by different combinations of time-space conditions. The analysis rested on extensive data: systematic observations, student surveys, interviews of students and teachers, and in one of the studies, examination results for a longer timeperiod. We found that multi-functional learning spaces where both students and teachers could engage in presentations, communication and use of digital resources enabled teaching for student active learning, thus promoting understanding and improved examination results. This however presupposed that teachers initially got educational support and additional time for planning. Good spatial preconditions also reduced space-related time-losses and disruptions of teaching and learning considerably, which is particularly important when the teacher-led time is sparse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skövde: Högskolan i Skövde, 2017
Keywords
rum, rumsliga ramar, tidsramar, högre utbildning, studentaktiv undervisning
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143436 (URN)
Projects
Rum för lärande
Available from: 2017-12-28 Created: 2017-12-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ahlgren, R., Malmros, B., Sjödin, A. & Tieva, Å. (2015). Att bryta en trend och förändra en tradition. In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015: Gränslös kunskap. Paper presented at Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015, Gränslös kunskap, Umeå, 8-9 oktober 2015 (pp. 6-7). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att bryta en trend och förändra en tradition
2015 (Swedish)In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015: Gränslös kunskap, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2015, p. 6-7Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2015
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-114102 (URN)
Conference
Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015, Gränslös kunskap, Umeå, 8-9 oktober 2015
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Tieva, Å., Persson, E., Rhodin, A., Sköldunger, A., Pettersén, S., Jonsäll, A. & Hörnell, A. (2015). Effect on energy and macronutrient intake with partial replacement of external food supply by in-house cooking at a nursing home for older people in Sweden. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 39(4), 369-379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect on energy and macronutrient intake with partial replacement of external food supply by in-house cooking at a nursing home for older people in Sweden
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 369-379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increased awareness of the importance of nutrition for older people's health and quality of life has underpinned projects and quality improvements for the meal situation in care establishments. The present study took place in a nursing home in a village outside an average-sized town situated in mid-Sweden. Care staff had initiated a change from external catered meals to purchase the food and cook the main meals themselves. The intention was to increase flexibility in accommodating the requests and needs of the elderly and, in doing so, to achieve increased professional pride and satisfaction. To ensure that no negative effects resulted for the residents in the nursing home, outcomes were evaluated through the present intervention study. The objective was to investigate whether and, if so, how their energy and nutrient intake and weight were affected. At the start, only one main hot meal was exchanged for home cooking to avoid work load problems as no increased costs were allowed and no extra staff were to be recruited. The study population consisted of 21 residents, aged 69-97 years. Weight, energy and nutrient intake were recorded before and during the intervention by 3-day food records validated by Goldberg's cutoff method. The same 3 days of the weekSunday to Tuesdayand the same menus were used for both measurement periods. At group level, the energy intake corresponded to the estimated energy requirements, both at baseline and at follow-up, although the intervention resulted in a significantly higher energy intake from the meals cooked in the ward kitchens. Two-thirds of the residents (n=13) slightly increased in weight from baseline to follow-up, while two participants (with body mass index 27.5 kg/m(2) and 33.5 kg/m(2), respectively) lost 5.0 kg and 6.9 kg, respectively. The total protein intake was insufficient both at baseline and follow-up and only met the participants' needs to 8122% and 83 +/- 26%, respectively. In conclusion, the intervention resulted in no adverse consequences for participants in terms of energy and nutrient intake. Most participants were weight stable or had small increases in weight, and the greatest weight gain was observed in the lighter clients. The low protein intake at both time points causes concern and suggests the need for further nutritional interventions to optimize older people's protein intake.

Keywords
Dietary protein, elderly, energy and nutrient intake, external caterer, in-house staff cooking, intervention
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104783 (URN)10.1111/ijcs.12176 (DOI)000355989000011 ()
Available from: 2015-06-13 Created: 2015-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Crnalic, S., Hörnberg, E., Wikström, P., Lerner, U. H., Tieva, Å., Svensson, O., . . . Bergh, A. (2010). Nuclear androgen receptor staining in bone metastases is related to a poor outcome in prostate cancer patients. Endocrine-Related Cancer, 17(4), 885-895
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nuclear androgen receptor staining in bone metastases is related to a poor outcome in prostate cancer patients
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2010 (English)In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 885-895Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Androgen receptors (ARs) are probably of importance during all phases of prostate cancer (PC) growth, but their role in bone metastases is largely unexplored. Bone metastases were therefore collected from hormone-naive (n=11), short-term castrated (n=7) and castration-resistant PC (CRPC, n=44) patients by biopsy (n=4) or at surgery to alleviate symptoms from metastases complications (metastasis surgery, n=58), and immunostained for nuclear ARs, Ki67, active caspase-3, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and chromogranin A, and results were related to serum PSA, treatments and outcome. Nuclear AR immunostaining was decreased and apoptosis was increased, but cell proliferation remained largely unaffected in metastases within a few days after surgical castration. In CRPC patients, nuclear AR staining of metastases was increased when compared to short-term castrated patients. The nuclear AR staining score was related to tumour cell proliferation, but it was not associated with other downstream effects of AR activation such as apoptosis and PSA staining, and it was only marginally related to the presence of neuroendocrine tumour cells. Serum PSA at metastasis surgery, although related to outcome, was not associated with AR staining, markers of metastasis growth or PSA staining in metastases. High nuclear AR immunostaining was associated with a particularly poor prognosis after metastasis surgery in CRPC patients, suggesting that such men may benefit from the potent AR blockers now tested in clinical trials.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-36843 (URN)10.1677/ERC-10-0059 (DOI)000284490000009 ()20688881 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-10-12 Created: 2010-10-12 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nordstrand, A., Nilsson, J., Tieva, Å., Wikström, P., Lerner, U. & Widmark, A. (2009). Establishment and validation of an in vitro co-culture model to study the interactions between bone and prostate cancer cells. Clinical & experimental metastasis, 26(8), 945-953
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Establishment and validation of an in vitro co-culture model to study the interactions between bone and prostate cancer cells
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2009 (English)In: Clinical & experimental metastasis, ISSN 0262-0898, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 945-953Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bone is the preferred site for prostate cancer (PCa) metastases. Once the tumor has established itself within the bone there is virtually no cure. To better understand the interactions between the PCa cells and bone environment in the metastatic process new model systems are needed. We have established a two-compartment in vitro co-culturing model that can be used to follow the trans-activation of bone and/or tumor cells. The model was validated using two PCa tumor cell lines (PC-3; lytic and LNCaP; mixed/osteoblastic) and one osteolytic inducing factor, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (D3). Results were in accordance with the expected bone phenotypes; PC-3 cells and D3 gave osteolytic gene expression profiles in calvariae, with up-regulation of genes needed for osteoclast differentiation, activation and function; Rankl, CathK, Trap and MMP-9, and down-regulation of genes associated with osteoblast differentiation and bone mineralization; Alp, Ocl and Dkk-1. LNCaP cells activated genes in the calvarial bones associated with osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, with marginal effects on osteolytic genes. The results were strengthened by similar changes in protein expression for a selection of the analyzed genes. Furthermore, the osteolytic gene expression profiles in calvarial bones co-cultured with PC-3 cells or with D3 were correlated with the actual ongoing resorptive process, as assessed by the release of collagen fragments from the calvariae. Our results show that the model can be used to follow tumor-induced bone remodeling, and by measuring changes in gene expression in the tumor cells we can also study how they respond to the bone microenvironment.

Keywords
Bone metastasis, Co-culture, Mouse calvaria, Osteoblastic, Osteolytic, Prostate cancer
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-30073 (URN)10.1007/s10585-009-9285-4 (DOI)000271722400002 ()19728119 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-12-02 Created: 2009-12-02 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Tieva, Å., Bergh, A. & Damber, J.-E. (2005). Alteration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor expression with the progression of prostate cancer in the Dunning rat adenocarcinoma sublines. Acta Oncologica, 44(3), 299-303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alteration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor expression with the progression of prostate cancer in the Dunning rat adenocarcinoma sublines
2005 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 299-303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-14672 (URN)doi:10.1080/02841860510007512 (DOI)16076703 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-09-14 Created: 2007-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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