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Larsson, Christel
Publications (10 of 77) Show all publications
Otten, J., Ryberg, M., Mellberg, C., Andersson, T., Chorell, E., Lindahl, B., . . . Olsson, T. (2019). Postprandial levels of GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon after two years of weight loss with a Paleolithic diet: a randomized controlled trial in healthy obese women. European Journal of Endocrinology, 180(6), 417-427
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postprandial levels of GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon after two years of weight loss with a Paleolithic diet: a randomized controlled trial in healthy obese women
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 180, no 6, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate how weight loss by different diets impacts on postprandial levels of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon.

METHODS: In this single-centre, parallel group 2-year trial, 70 healthy postmenopausal obese women were randomized to the Paleolithic diet or a healthy control diet based on Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. Both diets were without calorie restriction. The primary outcome was the change in fat mass. Here, secondary analyses on GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon measured during an OGTT are described.

RESULTS: In the Paleolithic diet group, mean weight loss compared to baseline was 11% at 6 months, and 10% at 24 months. In the control diet group, mean weight loss was 6% after 6 and 24 months (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.049 for the comparison between groups at 6 and 24 months respectively). Compared to baseline, the mean incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for GLP-1 increased by 34% and 45% after 6 and 24 months in the Paleolithic diet group, and increased by 59% after 24 months in the control diet group. The mean iAUC for GIP increased only in the Paleolithic diet group. The AUC for glucagon increased during the first 6 months in both groups. The fasting glucagon increase correlated with the β-hydroxybutyrate increase.

CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss caused an increase in postprandial GLP-1 levels and a further rise occurred during weight maintenance. Postprandial GIP levels increased only after the Paleolithic diet. Reduced postprandial glucagon suppression may be caused by a catabolic state.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bioscientifica, 2019
Keywords
glucagon, glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucose tolerance test, Paleolithic diet, weight loss
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158775 (URN)10.1530/EJE-19-0082 (DOI)000468743400012 ()31042670 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2006-0699Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2010-0398Swedish Research Council, K2011-12237-15-16Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Diabetes AssociationVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-06-11Bibliographically approved
Manousou, S., Stål, M., Larsson, C., Mellberg, C., Lindahl, B., Eggertsen, R., . . . Nyström, H. F. (2018). A Paleolithic-type diet results in iodine deficiency: a 2-year randomized trial in postmenopausal obese women.. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 72(1), 124-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Paleolithic-type diet results in iodine deficiency: a 2-year randomized trial in postmenopausal obese women.
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 124-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Different diets are used for weight loss. A Paleolithic-type diet (PD) has beneficial metabolic effects, but two of the largest iodine sources, table salt and dairy products, are excluded. The objectives of this study were to compare 24-h urinary iodine concentration (24-UIC) in subjects on PD with 24-UIC in subjects on a diet according to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) and to study if PD results in a higher risk of developing iodine deficiency (ID), than NNR diet.

SUBJECTS/METHODS: A 2-year prospective randomized trial in a tertiary referral center where healthy postmenopausal overweight or obese women were randomized to either PD (n=35) or NNR diet (n=35). Dietary iodine intake, 24-UIC, 24-h urinary iodine excretion (24-UIE), free thyroxin (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and thyrotropin (TSH) were measured at baseline, 6 and 24 months. Completeness of urine sampling was monitored by para-aminobenzoic acid and salt intake by urinary sodium.

RESULTS: At baseline, median 24-UIC (71.0 μg/l) and 24-UIE (134.0 μg/d) were similar in the PD and NNR groups. After 6 months, 24-UIC had decreased to 36.0 μg/l (P=0.001) and 24-UIE to 77.0 μg/d (P=0.001) in the PD group; in the NNR group, levels were unaltered. FT4, TSH and FT3 were similar in both groups, except for FT3 at 6 months being lower in PD than in NNR group.

CONCLUSIONS: A PD results in a higher risk of developing ID, than a diet according to the NNR. Therefore, we suggest iodine supplementation should be considered when on a PD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140504 (URN)10.1038/ejcn.2017.134 (DOI)000419795000017 ()28901333 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-12 Created: 2017-10-12 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Hansson, L. M., Heitmann, B. L., Larsson, C., Tynelius, P., Willmer, M. & Rasmussen, F. (2016). Associations Between Swedish Mothers' and 3-and 5-Year-Old Children's Food Intake. Journal of nutrition education and behavior, 48(8), 520-529.e1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations Between Swedish Mothers' and 3-and 5-Year-Old Children's Food Intake
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2016 (English)In: Journal of nutrition education and behavior, ISSN 1499-4046, E-ISSN 1878-2620, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 520-529.e1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate associations between mothers' and children's food intake. Design: Cross-sectional study. Background variables collected through self-reports and from the register of the total population. Mothers recorded their own and their children's food intake in a diary during 2 4-day periods. Setting: Eight counties in mid Sweden. Participants: Three-and 5-year-old children and their mothers were randomly selected from the register of the total population. A total of 2,045 families were invited, 355 of whom accepted. Mothers who accepted were older and to a larger extent born in Sweden. The final sample of mother-child pairs with complete food records was 189. Main Outcome Measures: Mothers' and children's food intake (16 food items). Analysis: Spearman rank-order correlation with 95% confidence intervals (2-sided). Moderation was investigated using generalized estimation equations with robust variance. Results: The strongest correlations between mothers' and children's food intake were found for pizza and oily fish (r = .70-.80). The weakest correlations were found for sugared drinks and fruit and berries (r = .24-.26). Children's age moderated the relationship between mothers' and children's intake of savoury snacks, as did place of residence for pizza intake. Conclusions and Implications: There were substantial correlations between children's and mothers' intake of various foods. Modeling of mothers' intake might be more effective in influencing young children's intake of certain foods, whereas other strategies, such as encouraging parents to influence food availability (eg, gatekeeping), might be more useful for some foods.

Keywords
children, nutrition, parent-child relations, dietary intake
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127738 (URN)10.1016/j.jneb.2016.05.015 (DOI)000386346700002 ()27422494 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-11-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Ahlgren, C., Hammarström, A., Sandberg, S., Lindahl, B., Olsson, T., Larsson, C. & Fjellman-Wiklund, A. (2016). Engagement in New Dietary Habits: Obese Women's Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23(1), 84-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engagement in New Dietary Habits: Obese Women's Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Dietary weight loss interventions most often result in weight loss, but weight maintenance on a long-term basis is the main problem in obesity treatment. There is a need for an increased understanding of the behaviour patterns involved in adopting a new dietary behavior and to maintain the behaviour over time.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to explore overweight and obese middle-aged women's experiences of the dietary change processes when participating in a 2-year-long diet intervention.

METHODS: Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 12 overweight and obese women (54-71 years) were made after their participation in a diet intervention programme. The programme was designed as a RCT study comparing a diet according to the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR diet) and a Palaeolithic diet (PD). Interviews were analysed according to Grounded Theory principles.

RESULTS: A core category "Engagement phases in the process of a diet intervention" concluded the analysis. Four categories included the informants' experiences during different stages of the process of dietary change: "Honeymoon phase", "Everyday life phase", "It's up to you phase" and "Crossroads phase". The early part of the intervention period was called "Honeymoon phase" and was characterised by positive experiences, including perceived weight loss and extensive support. The next phases, the "Everyday life phase" and "It's up to you phase", contained the largest obstacles to change. The home environment appeared as a crucial factor, which could be decisive for maintenance of the new dietary habits or relapse into old habits in the last phase called "Crossroads phase".

CONCLUSION: We identified various phases of engagement in the process of a long-term dietary intervention among middle-aged women. A clear personal goal and support from family and friends seem to be of major importance for long-term maintenance of new dietary habits. Gender relations within the household must be considered as a possible obstacle for women engaging in diet intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Dietary habits, Engagement, Experience, Intervention, Obese, Qualitative study
National Category
Applied Psychology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111592 (URN)10.1007/s12529-015-9495-x (DOI)000370243400009 ()26041583 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-17 Created: 2015-11-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Svensson, Å. & Larsson, C. (2015). A Mobile Phone App for Dietary Intake Assessment in Adolescents: An Evaluation Study. JMIR mhealth and uhealth, 3(4), 15-35, Article ID e93.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mobile Phone App for Dietary Intake Assessment in Adolescents: An Evaluation Study
2015 (English)In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 15-35, article id e93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is a great need for dietary assessment methods that suit the adolescent lifestyle and give valid intake data. Objective: To develop a mobile phone app and evaluate its ability to assess energy intake (EI) and total energy expenditure (TEE) compared with objectively measured TEE. Furthermore, to investigate the impact of factors on reporting accuracy of EI, and to compare dietary intake with a Web-based method. Methods: Participants 14 to 16 years of age were recruited from year nine in schools in Gothenburg, Sweden. In total, 81 adolescents used the mobile phone app over 1 to 6 days. TEE was measured with the SenseWear Armband (SWA) during the same or proximate days. Individual factors were assessed with a questionnaire. A total of 15 participants also recorded dietary intake using a Web-based method. Results: The mobile phone app underestimated EI by 29% on a group level (P<.001) compared to TEE measured with the SWA, and there was no significant correlation between EI and TEE. Accuracy of EI relative to TEE increased with a weekend day in the record (P=.007) and lower BMI z-score (P=.001). TEE assessed with the mobile phone app was 1.19 times the value of TEE measured by the SWA on a group level (P<.001), and the correlation between the methods was .75 (P<.001). Analysis of physical activity levels (PAL) from the mobile phone app stratified by gender showed that accuracy of the mobile phone app was higher among boys. EI, nutrients, and food groups assessed with the mobile phone app and Web-based method among 15 participants were not significantly different and several were significantly correlated, but strong conclusions cannot be drawn due to the low number of participants. Conclusions: By using a mobile phone dietary assessment app, on average 71% of adolescents' EI was captured. The accuracy of reported dietary intake was higher with lower BMI z-score and if a weekend day was included in the record. The daily question in the mobile phone app about physical activity could accurately rank the participants' TEE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
JMIR Publications, 2015
Keywords
adolescents, dietary assessment, mobile phone app, energy, SenseWear Armband
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113750 (URN)10.2196/mhealth.4804 (DOI)000365767100002 ()26534783 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-28 Created: 2015-12-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Boraxbekk, C.-J., Stomby, A., Ryberg, M., Lindahl, B., Larsson, C., Nyberg, L. & Olsson, T. (2015). Diet-Induced Weight Loss alters Functional Brain Responses during an Episodic Memory Task. Obesity Facts, 8, 261-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diet-Induced Weight Loss alters Functional Brain Responses during an Episodic Memory Task
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2015 (English)In: Obesity Facts, ISSN 1662-4025, E-ISSN 1662-4033, Vol. 8, p. 261-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: It has been suggested that overweight is negatively associated with cognitive functions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a reduction in body weight by dietary interventions could improve episodic memory performance and alter associated functional brain responses in overweight and obese women. Methods: 20 overweight postmenopausal women were randomized to either a modified paleolithic diet or a standard diet adhering to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations for 6 months. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain function during an episodic memory task as well as anthropometric and biochemical data before and after the interventions. Results: Episodic memory performance improved significantly (p = 0.010) after the dietary interventions. Concomitantly, brain activity increased in the anterior part of the right hippocampus during memory encoding, without differences between diets. This was associated with decreased levels of plasma free fatty acids (FFA). Brain activity increased in pre-frontal cortex and superior/middle temporal gyri. The magnitude of increase correlated with waist circumference reduction. During episodic retrieval, brain activity decreased in inferior and middle frontal gyri, and increased in middle/superior temporal gyri. Conclusions: Diet-induced weight loss, associated with decreased levels of plasma FFA, improves episodic memory linked to increased hippocampal activity.

Keywords
Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Episodic memory, Obesity, Diet interventions, Hippocampus
National Category
Neurosciences Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101039 (URN)10.1159/000437157 (DOI)000360933400004 ()26139105 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-03-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Stomby, A., Simonyte, K., Mellberg, C., Ryberg, M., Stimson, R. H., Larsson, C., . . . Olsson, T. (2015). Diet-induced weight loss has chronic tissue-specific effects on glucocorticoid metabolism in overweight postmenopausal women. International Journal of Obesity, 39(5), 814-819
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diet-induced weight loss has chronic tissue-specific effects on glucocorticoid metabolism in overweight postmenopausal women
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 814-819Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Objectives: Tissue-specific glucocorticoid metabolism is altered in obesity, and may increase cardiovascular risk. This dysregulation is normalized by short-term calorie restriction and weight loss, an effect that varies with dietary macronutrient composition. However, tissue-specific glucocorticoid metabolism has not been studied during long-term (>6 months) dietary interventions. Therefore our aim was to test whether long-term dietary interventions, either a paleolithic-type diet (PD) or a diet according to Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR) could normalize tissue-specific glucocorticoid metabolism in overweight and obese women.

Subjects/Methods: Forty-nine overweight/obese postmenopausal women were randomized to a paleolithic diet or a diet according to NNR for 24 months. At baseline, 6 and 24 months anthropometric measurements, insulin sensitivity, excretion of urinary glucocorticoid metabolites in 24-hour collections, conversion of orally administered cortisone to plasma cortisol and transcript levels of 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) in subcutaneous adipose tissue were studied.

Results: Both diet groups achieved significant and sustained weight loss. Weight loss with the PD was greater than on NNR diet after 6 months (P<0.001) but similar at 24 months. Urinary measurement of 5α-reductase activity was increased after 24 months in both groups compared with baseline (P<0.001). Subcutaneous adipose tissue 11βHSD1 gene expression decreased at 6 and 24 months in both diet groups (P=0.036). Consistent with increased liver 11βHSD1, conversion of oral cortisone to cortisol increased at 6 months (P=0.023) but was unchanged compared with baseline by 24 months.

Conclusions: Long-term weight loss in postmenopausal women has tissue-specific and time-dependent effects on glucocorticoid metabolism. This may alter local-tissue cortisol exposure contributing to improved metabolic function during weight loss.

National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96782 (URN)10.1038/ijo.2014.188 (DOI)000354097900013 ()25349058 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-03 Created: 2014-12-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Svensson, Å., Renström, F., Bluck, L., Lissner, L., Franks, P. W. & Larsson, C. (2014). Dietary intake assessment in women with different weight and pregnancy status using a short questionnaire. Public Health Nutrition, 17(9), 1939-1948
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary intake assessment in women with different weight and pregnancy status using a short questionnaire
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2014 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 1939-1948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: First, to evaluate the ability of a short dietary questionnaire (SDQ) to estimate energy intake (EI) on group and individual levels compared with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured by the doubly labelled water method. Second, to compare the SDQ's performance in estimating energy, nutrient and food intakes with a sixty-six-item FFQ used in large-scale Swedish epidemiological research. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Umea, Sweden. Subjects: In total, sixty-five non-pregnant women, of whom thirty-one were overweight or obese, and twenty-five pregnant, normal-weight women completed the protocol. Results: On average, the SDQ captured 78% and 79% of absolute TEE in the non-pregnant and pregnant normal-weight women, respectively. Furthermore, the SDQ captured an average of 57% of TEE in the overweight/obese nonpregnant women. The Spearman correlation of EI and TEE was significant in the overweight and obese women only (rho=0.37, 95% CI 0.02, 0.64). There was no significant difference between the SDQ and the more extensive FFQ in the ability to assess EI when compared with TEE. Intakes of most nutrients and foods were significantly higher when assessed with the SDQ compared with the FFQ. Conclusions: A new short dietary questionnaire with an alternative design underestimated EI of non-pregnant and pregnant, overweight and obese women on a group level but was able to rank the overweight/obese women according to EI. Furthermore, the short questionnaire captured as much or more of the energy, nutrient and food intakes of non-pregnant normal-weight and overweight/obese women on the group level as a traditional, more extensive FFQ.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2014
Keywords
Body weight, Dietary intake, Doubly labelled water, FFQ, Non-pregnant and pregnant women, Validity
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92904 (URN)10.1017/S1368980013003042 (DOI)000340166800005 ()
Available from: 2014-09-18 Created: 2014-09-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Hammarström, A., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Lindahl, B., Larsson, C. & Ahlgren, C. (2014). Experiences of barriers and facilitators to weight-loss in a diet intervention: a qualitative study of women in Northern Sweden. BMC Women's Health, 14, 59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of barriers and facilitators to weight-loss in a diet intervention: a qualitative study of women in Northern Sweden
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2014 (English)In: BMC Women's Health, ISSN 1472-6874, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 14, p. 59-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of research about the experiences of participating in weight-reducing interventions. The aim of this study was to explore barriers and facilitators to weight-loss experienced by participants in a diet intervention for middle-aged to older women in the general population in Northern Sweden.

METHOD: In the intervention the women were randomised to eat either a Palaeolithic-type diet or a diet according to Nordic Nutrition recommendations for 24 months. A strategic selection was made of women from the two intervention groups as well as from the drop-outs in relation to social class, civil status and age. Thematic structured interviews were performed with twelve women and analysed with qualitative content analyses.

RESULTS: The results showed that the women in the dietary intervention experienced two main barriers - struggling with self (related to difficulties in changing food habits, health problems, lack of self-control and insecurity) and struggling with implementing the diet (related to social relations and project-related difficulties) - and two main facilitators- striving for self-determination (related to having clear goals) and receiving support (from family/friends as well as from the project) - for weight-loss. There was a greater emphasis on barriers than on facilitators.

CONCLUSION: It is important to also include drop-outs from diet interventions in order to fully understand barriers to weight-loss. A gender-relational approach can bring new insights into understanding experiences of barriers to weight-loss.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
behavior change, weight management, obesity/overweight, intervention programmes, gender, qualitative analysis, health behavior, women's health/midlife
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-89223 (URN)10.1186/1472-6874-14-59 (DOI)000334949800001 ()
Available from: 2014-05-27 Created: 2014-05-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Mellberg, C., Sandberg, S., Ryberg, M., Eriksson, M., Brage, S., Larsson, C., . . . Lindahl, B. (2014). Long-term effects of a Palaeolithic-type diet in obese postmenopausal women: a 2-year randomized trial. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 68(3), 350-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term effects of a Palaeolithic-type diet in obese postmenopausal women: a 2-year randomized trial
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2014 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 350-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Objectives: Short-term studies have suggested beneficial effects of a Palaeolithic-type diet (PD) on body weight and metabolic balance. We now report the long-term effects of a PD on anthropometric measurements and metabolic balance in obese postmenopausal women, in comparison with a diet according to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR).

Subjects/Methods: Seventy obese postmenopausal women (mean age 60 years, body mass index 33 kg/m(2)) were assigned to an ad libitum PD or NNR diet in a 2-year randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome was change in fat mass as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results: Both groups significantly decreased total fat mass at 6 months (-6.5 and-2.6 kg) and 24 months (-4.6 and-2.9 kg), with a more pronounced fat loss in the PD group at 6 months (P<0.001) but not at 24 months (P=0.095). Waist circumference and sagittal diameter also decreased in both the groups, with a more pronounced decrease in the PD group at 6 months (-11.1 vs-5.8 cm, P=0.001 and-3.7 vs-2.0 cm, P<0.001, respectively). Triglyceride levels decreased significantly more at 6 and 24 months in the PD group than in the NNR group (P<0.001 and P=0.004). Nitrogen excretion did not differ between the groups.

Conclusions: A PD has greater beneficial effects vs an NNR diet regarding fat mass, abdominal obesity and triglyceride levels in obese postmenopausal women; effects not sustained for anthropometric measurements at 24 months. Adherence to protein intake was poor in the PD group. The long-term consequences of these changes remain to be studied.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2014
Keywords
adipose tissue, diet, insulin resistance, postmenopausal, weight
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86275 (URN)10.1038/ejcn.2013.290 (DOI)000332634300011 ()24473459 (PubMedID)
Note

C. Mellberg, S. Sandberg and M. Ryberg share first authorship.

T. Olsson and B. Lindahl share senior authorship.

Available from: 2014-02-21 Created: 2014-02-21 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved

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