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Bartels, Pia
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Skulason, S., Parsons, K. J., Svanback, R., Räsänen, K., Ferguson, M. M., Adams, C. E., . . . Snorrason, S. S. (2019). A way forward with eco evo devo: an extended theory of resource polymorphism with postglacial fishes as model systems. Biological Reviews, 94(5), 1786-1808
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A way forward with eco evo devo: an extended theory of resource polymorphism with postglacial fishes as model systems
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2019 (English)In: Biological Reviews, ISSN 1464-7931, E-ISSN 1469-185X, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 1786-1808Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A major goal of evolutionary science is to understand how biological diversity is generated and altered. Despite considerable advances, we still have limited insight into how phenotypic variation arises and is sorted by natural selection. Here we argue that an integrated view, which merges ecology, evolution and developmental biology (eco evo devo) on an equal footing, is needed to understand the multifaceted role of the environment in simultaneously determining the development of the phenotype and the nature of the selective environment, and how organisms in turn affect the environment through eco evo and eco devo feedbacks. To illustrate the usefulness of an integrated eco evo devo perspective, we connect it with the theory of resource polymorphism (i.e. the phenotypic and genetic diversification that occurs in response to variation in available resources). In so doing, we highlight fishes from recently glaciated freshwater systems as exceptionally well‐suited model systems for testing predictions of an eco evo devo framework in studies of diversification. Studies on these fishes show that intraspecific diversity can evolve rapidly, and that this process is jointly facilitated by (i) the availability of diverse environments promoting divergent natural selection; (ii) dynamic developmental processes sensitive to environmental and genetic signals; and (iii) eco evo and eco devo feedbacks influencing the selective and developmental environments of the phenotype. We highlight empirical examples and present a conceptual model for the generation of resource polymorphism – emphasizing eco evo devo, and identify current gaps in knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
divergent evolution, epigenetics, genetics, niche construction, non-genetic inheritance, phenotype, phenotypic plasticity, natural selection, polymorphic fishes, speciation
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164612 (URN)10.1111/brv.12534 (DOI)000485285900013 ()31215138 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067462518 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Bartels, P., Ask, J., Andersson, A., Karlsson, J. & Giesler, R. (2018). Allochthonous Organic Matter Supports Benthic but Not Pelagic Food Webs in Shallow Coastal Ecosystems. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 21(7), 1459-1470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Allochthonous Organic Matter Supports Benthic but Not Pelagic Food Webs in Shallow Coastal Ecosystems
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2018 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1459-1470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rivers transport large amounts of allochthonous organic matter (OM) to the ocean every year, but there are still fundamental gaps in how allochthonous OM is processed in the marine environment. Here, we estimated the relative contribution of allochthonous OM (allochthony) to the biomass of benthic and pelagic consumers in a shallow coastal ecosystem in the northern Baltic Sea. We used deuterium as a tracer of allochthony and assessed both temporal variation (monthly from May to August) and spatial variation (within and outside river plume). We found variability in allochthony in space and time and across species, with overall higher values for zoobenthos (26.2 +/- 20.9%) than for zooplankton (0.8 +/- 0.3%). Zooplankton allochthony was highest in May and very low during the other months, likely as a result of high inputs of allochthonous OM during the spring flood that fueled the pelagic food chain for a short period. In contrast, zoobenthos allochthony was only lower in June and remained high during the other months. Allochthony of zoobenthos was generally higher close to the river mouth than outside of the river plume, whereas it did not vary spatially for zooplankton. Last, zoobenthos allochthony was higher in deeper than in shallower areas, indicating that allochthonous OM might be more important when autochthonous resources are limited. Our results suggest that climate change predictions of increasing inputs of allochthonous OM to coastal ecosystems may affect basal energy sources supporting coastal food webs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
climate change, terrestrial organic carbon, stable isotope analysis, autochthonous production, benthic-pelagic coupling, food webs, Bothnian Sea
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153548 (URN)10.1007/s10021-018-0233-5 (DOI)000448816300015 ()
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsEcosystem dynamics in the Baltic Sea in a changing climate perspective - ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2020-03-16Bibliographically approved
Olajos, F., Bokma, F., Bartels, P., Myrstener, E., Rydberg, J., Öhlund, G., . . . Englund, G. (2018). Estimating species colonization dates using DNA in lake sediment. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 9(3), 535-543
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating species colonization dates using DNA in lake sediment
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2018 (English)In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2041-210X, E-ISSN 2041-210X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 535-543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]
  1. Detection of DNA in lake sediments holds promise as a tool to study processes like extinction, colonization, adaptation and evolutionary divergence. However, low concentrations make sediment DNA difficult to detect, leading to high false negative rates. Additionally, contamination could potentially lead to high false positive rates. Careful laboratory procedures can reduce false positive and negative rates, but should not be assumed to completely eliminate them. Therefore, methods are needed that identify potential false positive and negative results, and use this information to judge the plausibility of different interpretations of DNA data from natural archives.
  2. We developed a Bayesian algorithm to infer the colonization history of a species using records of DNA from lake-sediment cores, explicitly labelling some observations as false positive or false negative. We illustrate the method by analysing DNA of whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.) from sediment cores covering the past 10,000 years from two central Swedish lakes. We provide the algorithm as an R-script, and the data from this study as example input files.
  3. In one lake, Stora Lögdasjön, where connectivity with the proto-Baltic Sea and the degree of whitefish ecotype differentiation suggested colonization immediately after deglaciation, DNA was indeed successfully recovered and amplified throughout the post-glacial sediment. For this lake, we found no loss of detection probability over time, but a high false negative rate. In the other lake, Hotagen, where connectivity and ecotype differentiation suggested colonization long after deglaciation, DNA was amplified only in the upper part of the sediment, and colonization was estimated at 2,200 bp based on the assumption that successful amplicons represent whitefish presence. Here the earliest amplification represents a false positive with a posterior probability of 41%, which increases the uncertainty in the estimated time of colonization.
  4. Complementing careful laboratory procedures aimed at preventing contamination, our method estimates contamination rates from the data. By combining these results with estimates of false negative rates, our models facilitate unbiased interpretation of data from natural DNA archives.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
British Ecological Society, 2018
Keywords
ancient DNA, colonization, Coregonus lavaretus, detection probability, divergence, environmental DNA, lake sediment, population age
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143248 (URN)10.1111/2041-210X.12890 (DOI)000426867600010 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-5110
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-08-07Bibliographically approved
Bartels, P., Hirsch, P., Svanbäck, R. & Eklöv, P. (2016). Dissolved organic carbon reduces habitat coupling by top predators in lake ecosystems. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 19(6), 955-967
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dissolved organic carbon reduces habitat coupling by top predators in lake ecosystems
2016 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 955-967Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing input of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been identified as a widespread environmental phenomenon in many aquatic ecosystems. Terrestrial DOC influences basal trophic levels: it can subsidize pelagic bacterial production and impede benthic primary production via light attenuation. However, little is known about the impacts of elevated DOC concentrations on higher trophic levels, especially on top consumers. Here, we used Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) to investigate the effects of increasing DOC concentrations on top predator populations. We applied stable isotope analysis and geometric morphometrics to estimate long-term resource and habitat utilization of perch. Habitat coupling, the ability to exploit littoral and pelagic resources, strongly decreased with increasing DOC concentrations due to a shift toward feeding predominantly on pelagic resources. Simultaneously, resource use and body morphology became increasingly alike for littoral and pelagic perch populations with increasing DOC, suggesting more intense competition in lakes with high DOC. Eye size of perch increased with increasing DOC concentrations, likely as a result of deteriorating visual conditions, suggesting a sensory response to environmental change. Increasing input of DOC to aquatic ecosystems is a common result of environmental change and might affect top predator populations in multiple and complex ways.

Keywords
allochthony, brownification, food web coupling, visibility, foraging, climate change
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129994 (URN)10.1007/s10021-016-9978-x (DOI)000386710000001 ()
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Huser, B. & Bartels, P. (2015). The feeding ecology of carp. In: C. Pietsch and P.E. Hirsch (Ed.), Biology and ecology of carp: (pp. 217-243). CRC Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The feeding ecology of carp
2015 (English)In: Biology and ecology of carp / [ed] C. Pietsch and P.E. Hirsch, CRC Press, 2015, p. 217-243Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CRC Press, 2015
National Category
Ecology Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-113406 (URN)10.1201/b18547-14 (DOI)978-1-4822-0664-7 (ISBN)978-1-4822-0665-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Soininen, J., Bartels, P., Heino, J., Luoto, M. & Hillebrand, H. (2015). Toward More Integrated Ecosystem Research in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments. BioScience, 65(2), 174-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward More Integrated Ecosystem Research in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments
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2015 (English)In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 174-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are tightly linked through the fluxes of organisms and matter. However, aquatic and terrestrial ecologists have mainly studied these ecosystems separately, a "splendid isolation" historically fostered by disciplinary boundaries between institutes and funding schemes. Here, we synthesize the progress made in joint aquatic and terrestrial research and suggest new approaches to meeting future research challenges in changing environments. Aquatic and terrestrial organisms use cross-system subsidies to a comparable extent and addressing reciprocal subsidies is therefore necessary in order to understand biodiversity and functioning of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We suggest that the metaecosystem framework could be expanded to explicitly consider cross-system fluxes of matter differing in magnitude and quality. We further advocate the inclusion of cross-system analyses at broader spatial extents, for which remote-sensing applications would be a useful tool in environmental research at the land-water interface. A cross-ecosystem approach would therefore be valuable for a more thorough understanding of ecosystem responses to various stressors in the face of rapid environmental change.

Keywords
catchment, cross-ecosystem, metaecosystems, remote sensing, subsidies
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100772 (URN)10.1093/biosci/biu216 (DOI)000348973600012 ()
Available from: 2015-04-26 Created: 2015-03-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Bartels, P., Cucherousset, J., Steger, K., Eklöv, P., Tranvik, L. J. & Hillebrand, H. (2012). Reciprocal subsidies between freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems structure consumer resource dynamics. Ecology, 93(5), 1173-1182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reciprocal subsidies between freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems structure consumer resource dynamics
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2012 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 93, no 5, p. 1173-1182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cross-ecosystem movements of material and energy, particularly reciprocal resource fluxes across the freshwater-land interface, have received major attention. Freshwater ecosystems may receive higher amounts of subsidies (i.e., resources produced outside the focal ecosystem) than terrestrial ecosystems, potentially leading to increased secondary production in freshwaters. Here we used a meta-analytic approach to quantify the magnitude and direction of subsidy inputs across the freshwater-land interface and to determine subsequent responses in recipient animals. Terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems differed in the magnitude of subsidies they received, with aquatic ecosystems generally receiving higher subsidies than terrestrial ecosystems. Surprisingly, and despite the large discrepancy in magnitude, the contribution of these subsidies to animal carbon inferred from stable isotope composition did not differ between freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems, likely due to the differences in subsidy quality. The contribution of allochthonous subsidies was highest to primary consumers and predators, suggesting that bottom-up and top-down effects may be affected considerably by the input of allochthonous resources. Future work on subsidies will profit from a food web dynamic approach including indirect trophic interactions and propagating effects.

Keywords
allochthonous, autochthonous, bottom-up, cross-ecosystem, food web dynamics, resource subsidy, top-down
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-56423 (URN)10.1890/11-1210.1 (DOI)000304368100022 ()
Available from: 2012-06-19 Created: 2012-06-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Bartels, P., Cucherousset, J., Gudasz, C., Jansson, M., Karlsson, J., Persson, L., . . . Eklov, P. (2012). Terrestrial subsidies to lake food webs: an experimental approach. Oecologia, 168(3), 807-818
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Terrestrial subsidies to lake food webs: an experimental approach
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2012 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 168, no 3, p. 807-818Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cross-ecosystem movements of material and energy are ubiquitous. Aquatic ecosystems typically receive material that also includes organic matter from the surrounding catchment. Terrestrial-derived (allochthonous) organic matter can enter aquatic ecosystems in dissolved or particulate form. Several studies have highlighted the importance of dissolved organic carbon to aquatic consumers, but less is known about allochthonous particulate organic carbon (POC). Similarly, most studies showing the effects of allochthonous organic carbon (OC) on aquatic consumers have investigated pelagic habitats; the effects of allochthonous OC on benthic communities are less well studied. Allochthonous inputs might further decrease primary production through light reduction, thereby potentially affecting autotrophic resource availability to consumers. Here, an enclosure experiment was carried out to test the importance of POC input and light availability on the resource use in a benthic food web of a clear-water lake. Corn starch (a C-4 plant) was used as a POC source due to its insoluble nature and its distinct carbon stable isotope value (delta C-13). The starch carbon was closely dispersed over the bottom of the enclosures to study the fate of a POC source exclusively available to sediment biota. The addition of starch carbon resulted in a clear shift in the isotopic signature of surface-dwelling herbivorous and predatory invertebrates. Although the starch carbon was added solely to the sediment surface, the carbon originating from the starch reached zooplankton. We suggest that allochthonous POC can subsidize benthic food webs directly and can be further transferred to pelagic systems, thereby highlighting the importance of benthic pathways for pelagic habitats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2012
Keywords
Allochthonous, Cross-ecosystem, Autochthonous, Aquatic-terrestrial linkage, Benthic
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-54133 (URN)10.1007/s00442-011-2141-7 (DOI)000301706800020 ()
Available from: 2012-04-20 Created: 2012-04-17 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Bartels, P., Hirsch, P. E., Svanbäck, R. & Eklöv, P. (2012). Water Transparency Drives Intra-Population Divergence in Eurasian Perch (Perca fluviatilis). PLoS ONE, 7(8), e43641
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Water Transparency Drives Intra-Population Divergence in Eurasian Perch (Perca fluviatilis)
2012 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8, p. e43641-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trait combinations that lead to a higher efficiency in resource utilization are important drivers of divergent natural selection and adaptive radiation. However, variation in environmental features might constrain foraging in complex ways and therefore impede the exploitation of critical resources. We tested the effect of water transparency on intra-population divergence in morphology of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) across seven lakes in central Sweden. Morphological divergence between near-shore littoral and open-water pelagic perch substantially increased with increasing water transparency. Reliance on littoral resources increased strongly with increasing water transparency in littoral populations, whereas littoral reliance was not affected by water transparency in pelagic populations. Despite the similar reliance on pelagic resources in pelagic populations along the water transparency gradient, the utilization of particular pelagic prey items differed with variation in water transparency in pelagic populations. Pelagic perch utilized cladocerans in lakes with high water transparency and copepods in lakes with low water transparency. We suggest that under impaired visual conditions low utilization of littoral resources by littoral perch and utilization of evasive copepods by pelagic perch may lead to changes in morphology. Our findings indicate that visual conditions can affect population divergence in predator populations through their effects on resource utilization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: Public Library of Science, 2012
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-68304 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0043641 (DOI)000308063700123 ()
Available from: 2013-04-16 Created: 2013-04-16 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Öhlund, G., Peedu, M., Nilsson, K. A., Fallgren, B., Magnusson, M., Öhlund, S.-O., . . . Englund, G.The chronology of incipient speciation in whitefish.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The chronology of incipient speciation in whitefish
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-59464 (URN)
Available from: 2012-09-14 Created: 2012-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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