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Grebe, Markus
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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Gendre, D., Baral, A., Dang, X., Esnay, N., Boutté, Y., Stanislas, T., . . . Bhalerao, R. P. (2019). Rho-of-plant activated root hair formation requires Arabidopsis YIP4a/b gene function. Development, 146(5), Article ID dev168559.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rho-of-plant activated root hair formation requires Arabidopsis YIP4a/b gene function
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2019 (English)In: Development, ISSN 0950-1991, E-ISSN 1477-9129, Vol. 146, no 5, article id dev168559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Root hairs are protrusions from root epidermal cells with crucial roles in plant soil interactions. Although much is known about patterning, polarity and tip growth of root hairs, contributions of membrane trafficking to hair initiation remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the trans-Golgi network-localized YPT-INTERACTING PROTEIN 4a and YPT-INTERACTING PROTEIN 4b (YIP4a/b) contribute to activation and plasma membrane accumulation of Rho-of-plant (ROP) small GTPases during hair initiation, identifying YIP4a/b as central trafficking components in ROP-dependent root hair formation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Company of Biologists, 2019
Keywords
ROP, YIP, Root hair, Secretion, Trans-Golgi network
National Category
Developmental Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157769 (URN)10.1242/dev.168559 (DOI)000461331900003 ()30770391 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062882465 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Nakamura, M., Claes, A. R., Grebe, T., Hermkes, R., Viotti, C., Ikeda, Y. & Grebe, M. (2018). Auxin and ROP GTPase Signaling of Polar Nuclear Migration in Root Epidermal Hair Cells. Plant Physiology, 176(1), 378-391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auxin and ROP GTPase Signaling of Polar Nuclear Migration in Root Epidermal Hair Cells
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2018 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 176, no 1, p. 378-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Polar nuclear migration is crucial during the development of diverse eukaryotes. In plants, root hair growth requires polar nuclear migration into the outgrowing hair. However, knowledge about the dynamics and the regulatory mechanisms underlying nuclear movements in root epidermal cells remains limited. Here, we show that both auxin and Rho-of-Plant (ROP) signaling modulate polar nuclear position at the inner epidermal plasma membrane domain oriented to the cortical cells during cell elongation as well as subsequent polar nuclear movement to the outer domain into the emerging hair bulge in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Auxin signaling via the nuclear AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7)/ARF19 and INDOLE ACETIC ACID7 pathway ensures correct nuclear placement toward the inner membrane domain. Moreover, precise inner nuclear placement relies on SPIKE1 Rho-GEF, SUPERCENTIPEDE1 Rho-GDI, and ACTIN7 (ACT7) function and to a lesser extent on VTI11 vacuolar SNARE activity. Strikingly, the directionality and/or velocity of outer polar nuclear migration into the hair outgrowth along actin strands also are ACT7 dependent, auxin sensitive, and regulated by ROP signaling. Thus, our findings provide a founding framework revealing auxin and ROP signaling of inner polar nuclear position with some contribution by vacuolar morphology and of actin-dependent outer polar nuclear migration in root epidermal hair cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society of Plant Biologists, 2018
National Category
Botany Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144414 (URN)10.1104/pp.17.00713 (DOI)000419675300030 ()29084900 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-09 Created: 2018-02-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nakamura, M. & Grebe, M. (2018). Outer, inner and planar polarity in the Arabidopsis root. Current opinion in plant biology, 41, 46-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outer, inner and planar polarity in the Arabidopsis root
2018 (English)In: Current opinion in plant biology, ISSN 1369-5266, E-ISSN 1879-0356, Vol. 41, p. 46-53Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plant roots control uptake of water and nutrients and cope with environmental challenges. The root epidermis provides the first selective interface for nutrient absorption, while the endodermis produces the main apoplastic diffusion barrier in the form of a structure called the Casparian strip. The positioning of root hairs on epidermal cells, and of the Casparian strip around endodermal cells, requires asymmetries along cellular axes (cell polarity). Cell polarity is termed planar polarity, when coordinated within the plane of a given tissue layer. Here, we review recent molecular advances towards understanding both the polar positioning of the proteo-lipid membrane domain instructing root hair initiation, and the cytoskeletal, trafficking and polar tethering requirements of proteins at outer or inner plasma membrane domains. Finally, we highlight progress towards understanding mechanisms of Casparian strip formation and underlying endodermal cell polarity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146239 (URN)10.1016/j.pbi.2017.08.002 (DOI)000427333500008 ()28869926 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Mao, H., Aryal, B., Langenecker, T., Hagmann, J., Geisler, M. & Grebe, M. (2017). Arabidopsis BTB/POZ protein-dependent PENETRATION3 trafficking and disease susceptibility. Nature Plants, 3(11), 854-858
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arabidopsis BTB/POZ protein-dependent PENETRATION3 trafficking and disease susceptibility
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2017 (English)In: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 3, no 11, p. 854-858Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The outermost cell layer of plant roots (epidermis) constantly encounters environmental challenges. The epidermal outer plasma membrane domain harbours the PENETRATION3 (PEN3)/ABCG36/PDR8 ATP-binding cassette transporter that confers non-host resistance to several pathogens. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM-ARRESTED PEN3 (EAP3) BTB/POZ-domain protein specifically mediates PEN3 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum and confers resistance to a root-penetrating fungus, providing prime evidence for BTB/POZ-domain protein-dependent membrane trafficking underlying disease resistance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2017
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142253 (URN)10.1038/s41477-017-0039-z (DOI)000414512800010 ()
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Poxson, D. J., Karady, M., Gabrielsson, R., Alkattan, A. Y., Gustavsson, A., Doyle, S. M., . . . Berggren, M. (2017). Regulating plant physiology with organic electronics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(18), 4597-4602
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulating plant physiology with organic electronics
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 18, p. 4597-4602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) provides flow-free and accurate delivery of small signaling compounds at high spatio-temporal resolution. To date, the application of OEIPs has been limited to delivery of nonaromatic molecules to mammalian systems, particularly for neuroscience applications. However, many long-standing questions in plant biology remain unanswered due to a lack of technology that precisely delivers plant hormones, based on cyclic alkanes or aromatic structures, to regulate plant physiology. Here, we report the employment of OEIPs for the delivery of the plant hormone auxin to induce differential concentration gradients and modulate plant physiology. We fabricated OEIP devices based on a synthesized dendritic polyelectrolyte that enables electrophoretic transport of aromatic substances. Delivery of auxin to transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in vivo was monitored in real time via dynamic fluorescent auxin-response reporters and induced physiological responses in roots. Our results provide a starting point for technologies enabling direct, rapid, and dynamic electronic interaction with the biochemical regulation systems of plants.

Keywords
auxin, Arabidopsis thaliana, dendritic polymer, bioelectronics, polyelectrolyte
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135252 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1617758114 (DOI)000400358000030 ()28420793 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Mao, H., Nakamura, M., Viotti, C. & Grebe, M. (2016). A Framework for Lateral Membrane Trafficking and Polar Tethering of the PEN3 ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter. Plant Physiology, 172(4), 2245-2260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Framework for Lateral Membrane Trafficking and Polar Tethering of the PEN3 ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter
2016 (English)In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 172, no 4, p. 2245-2260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The outermost cell layer of plants, the epidermis, and its outer (lateral) membrane domain facing the environment are continuously challenged by biotic and abiotic stresses. Therefore, the epidermis and the outer membrane domain provide important selective and protective barriers. However, only a small number of specifically outer membrane-localized proteins are known. Similarly, molecular mechanisms underlying the trafficking and the polar placement of outer membrane domain proteins require further exploration. Here, we demonstrate that ACTIN7 (ACT7) mediates trafficking of the PENETRATION3 (PEN3) outer membrane protein from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane in the root epidermis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and that actin function contributes to PEN3 endocytic recycling. In contrast to such generic ACT7-dependent trafficking from the TGN, the EXOCYST84b (EXO84b) tethering factor mediates PEN3 outer-membrane polarity. Moreover, precise EXO84b placement at the outer membrane domain itself requires ACT7 function. Hence, our results uncover spatially and mechanistically distinct requirements for ACT7 function during outer lateral membrane cargo trafficking and polarity establishment. They further identify an exocyst tethering complex mediator of outer lateral membrane cargo polarity.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131101 (URN)10.1104/pp.16.01252 (DOI)000391173400014 ()27803190 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-13 Created: 2017-02-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Krupinski, P., Bozorg, B., Larsson, A., Pietra, S., Grebe, M. & Jönsson, H. (2016). A Model Analysis of Mechanisms for Radial Microtubular Patterns at Root Hair Initiation Sites. Frontiers in Plant Science, 7, Article ID 1560.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Model Analysis of Mechanisms for Radial Microtubular Patterns at Root Hair Initiation Sites
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2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 7, article id 1560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plant cells have two main modes of growth generating anisotropic structures. Diffuse growth where whole cell walls extend in specific directions, guided by anisotropically positioned cellulose fibers, and tip growth, with inhomogeneous addition of new cell wall material at the tip of the structure. Cells are known to regulate these processes via molecular signals and the cytoskeleton. Mechanical stress has been proposed to provide an input to the positioning of the cellulose fibers via cortical microtubules in diffuse growth. In particular, a stress feedback model predicts a circumferential pattern of fibers surrounding apical tissues and growing primordia, guided by the anisotropic curvature in such tissues. In contrast, during the initiation of tip growing root hairs, a star-like radial pattern has recently been observed. Here, we use detailed finite element models to analyze how a change in mechanical properties at the root hair initiation site can lead to star-like stress patterns in order to understand whether a stress-based feedback model can also explain the microtubule patterns seen during root hair initiation. We show that two independent mechanisms, individually or combined, can be sufficient to generate radial patterns. In the first, new material is added locally at the position of the root hair. In the second, increased tension in the initiation area provides a mechanism. Finally, we describe how a molecular model of Rho-of-plant (ROP) GTPases activation driven by auxin can position a patch of activated ROP protein basally along a 2D root epidermal cell plasma membrane, paving the way for models where mechanical and molecular mechanisms cooperate in the initial placement and outgrowth of root hairs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media, 2016
Keywords
plant cell wall, finite element modeling, computational morphodynamics, root hair initiation, microtubules, cellulose fibers, composite material
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130023 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2016.01560 (DOI)000386484400001 ()27840629 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Kiefer, C. S., Claes, A. R., Nzayisenga, J.-C., Pietra, S., Stanislas, T., Hueser, A., . . . Grebe, M. (2015). Arabidopsis AIP1-2 restricted by WER-mediated patterning modulates planar polarity. Development, 142(1), 151-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arabidopsis AIP1-2 restricted by WER-mediated patterning modulates planar polarity
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2015 (English)In: Development, ISSN 0950-1991, E-ISSN 1477-9129, Vol. 142, no 1, p. 151-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) is crucial for the development of diverse multicellular organisms. Small Rac/Rho-family GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton contribute to planar polarity formation at sites of polarity establishment in animals and plants. Yet, upstream pathways coordinating planar polarity differ strikingly between kingdoms. In the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, a concentration gradient of the phytohormone auxin coordinates polar recruitment of Rho-of-plant (ROP) to sites of polar epidermal hair initiation. However, little is known about cytoskeletal components and interactions that contribute to this planar polarity or about their relation to the patterning machinery. Here, we show that ACTIN7 (ACT7) represents a main actin isoform required for planar polarity of root hair positioning, interacting with the negative modulator ACTIN-INTERACTING PROTEIN1-2 (AIP1-2). ACT7, AIP1-2 and their genetic interaction are required for coordinated planar polarity of ROP downstream of ethylene signalling. Strikingly, AIP1-2 displays hair cell file-enriched expression, restricted by WEREWOLF (WER)-dependent patterning and modified by ethylene and auxin action. Hence, our findings reveal AIP1-2, expressed under control of the WER-dependent patterning machinery and the ethylene signalling pathway, as a modulator of actin-mediated planar polarity.

Keywords
AIP1, Arabidopsis, WEREWOLF, Actin, Patterning, Planar polarity
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100147 (URN)10.1242/dev.111013 (DOI)000348240500020 ()25428588 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2003-2744
Available from: 2015-02-26 Created: 2015-02-24 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Stanislas, T., Huser, A., Barbosa, I. C. R., Kiefer, C. S., Brackmann, K., Pietra, S., . . . Grebe, M. (2015). Arabidopsis D6PK is a lipid domain-dependent mediator of root epidermal planar polarity. Nature Plants, 1, Article ID 15162.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Arabidopsis D6PK is a lipid domain-dependent mediator of root epidermal planar polarity
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2015 (English)In: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 1, article id 15162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Development of diverse multicellular organisms relies on coordination of single-cell polarities within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity). Cell polarity often involves plasma membrane heterogeneity generated by accumulation of specific lipids and proteins into membrane subdomains. Coordinated hair positioning along Arabidopsis root epidermal cells provides a planar polarity model in plants, but knowledge about the functions of proteo-lipid domains in planar polarity signalling remains limited. Here we show that Rho-of-plant (ROP) 2 and 6, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase 3 (PIP5K3), DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) 1A and DRP2B accumulate in a sterol-enriched, polar membrane domain during root hair initiation. DRP1A, DRP2B, PIP5K3 and sterols are required for planar polarity and the AGCVIII kinase D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) is a modulator of this process. D6PK undergoes phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate- and sterol-dependent basal-to-planar polarity switching into the polar, lipid-enriched domain just before hair formation, unravelling lipid-dependent D6PK localization during late planar polarity signalling.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112252 (URN)10.1038/NPLANTS.2015.162 (DOI)000364417700001 ()
Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Pietra, S., Lang, P. & Grebe, M. (2015). SABRE is required for stabilization of root hair patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana. Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, 153(3), 440-453
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SABRE is required for stabilization of root hair patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana
2015 (English)In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 153, no 3, p. 440-453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patterned differentiation of distinct cell types is essential for the development of multicellular organisms. The root epidermis of Arabidopsis thaliana is composed of alternating files of root hair and non-hair cells and represents a model system for studying the control of cell-fate acquisition. Epidermal cell fate is regulated by a network of genes that translate positional information from the underlying cortical cell layer into a specific pattern of differentiated cells. While much is known about the genes of this network, new players continue to be discovered. Here we show that the SABRE (SAB) gene, known to mediate microtubule organization, anisotropic cell growth and planar polarity, has an effect on root epidermal hair cell patterning. Loss of SAB function results in ectopic root hair formation and destabilizes the expression of cell fate and differentiation markers in the root epidermis, including expression of the WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABRA2 (GL2) genes. Double mutant analysis reveal that wer and caprice (cpc) mutants, defective in core components of the epidermal patterning pathway, genetically interact with sab. This suggests that SAB may act on epidermal patterning upstream of WER and CPC. Hence, we provide evidence for a role of SAB in root epidermal patterning by affecting cell-fate stabilization. Our work opens the door for future studies addressing SAB-dependent functions of the cytoskeleton during root epidermal patterning.

National Category
Developmental Biology Cell Biology
Research subject
Developmental Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87837 (URN)10.1111/ppl.12257 (DOI)000349969500009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-4846
Note

Originally published in manuscript form.

Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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