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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Neidhardt-Mokoena, A. & Wiltse, H. (2023). Generous crowdedness: cultivating space(s) for care at alternative design museums. In: S. Holmlid; V. Rodrigues; C. Westin; P. G. Krogh; M. Mäkelä; D. Svanaes; Å. Wikberg-Nilsson (Ed.), Nordes 2023: Exploratory papers. Paper presented at Nordes 2023, The 10th Nordic Design Research Society (Nordes) Conference: This Space Intentionally Left Blank, Norrköping, Sweden, June 12-14, 2023. , Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Generous crowdedness: cultivating space(s) for care at alternative design museums
2023 (English)In: Nordes 2023: Exploratory papers / [ed] S. Holmlid; V. Rodrigues; C. Westin; P. G. Krogh; M. Mäkelä; D. Svanaes; Å. Wikberg-Nilsson, 2023, article id 6Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The design discipline is implicated in thetrajectories that have led us to an unsustainable present. There is an urgency to re-direct the design discipline, so that it can become able to not onlystay with past and present trouble, but also to develop other futures. To see how design museums might support change rather than preservation, welook to the example of protest archives. Based onan analysis of relational space, we suggest that therelative crowdedness of protest archives emerges out of matters of care, and allows for the development of alternative ways of being and creating. We thus identify a set of qualities that might be used to inform development of alternative spaces for care in design that aim to become able to respond to urgencies and to open up more just futures.

Keywords
relational space, design museums, protest archives, matters of care
National Category
Design Gender Studies
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-210253 (URN)10.21606/nordes.2023.72 (DOI)
Conference
Nordes 2023, The 10th Nordic Design Research Society (Nordes) Conference: This Space Intentionally Left Blank, Norrköping, Sweden, June 12-14, 2023
Available from: 2023-06-20 Created: 2023-06-20 Last updated: 2023-06-20Bibliographically approved
Özçetin, S. & Wiltse, H. (2023). Terms of entanglement: a posthumanist reading of Terms of Service. Human-Computer Interaction
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Terms of entanglement: a posthumanist reading of Terms of Service
2023 (English)In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Contemporary connected things entail ongoing relations between producers, end users, and other actors characterized by ongoing updates and production of data about and through use. These relations are currently governed by Terms of Service (ToS) and related policy documents, which are known to be mostly ignored beyond the required interaction of ticking a box to indicate consent. This seems to be a symptom of failure to design for effectively mediating ongoing relations among multiple stakeholders involving multiple forms of value generation. In this paper, we use ToS as an entrance point to explore design practices for democratic data governance. Drawing on posthuman perspectives, we make three posthuman design moves exploring entanglements, decentering, and co-performance in relation to Terms of Service. Through these explorations we begin to sketch a space for design to engage with democratic data governance through a practice of what we call revealing design that is aimed at meaningfully making visible these complex networked relations in actionable ways. This approach is meant to open alternative possible trajectories that could be explored for design to enable genuine democratic data governance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Democratic data governance, Terms of Service, privacy policies, posthuman design, more-than-human design tactics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-217348 (URN)10.1080/07370024.2023.2281928 (DOI)2-s2.0-85178443458 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, Horizon Europe, 955990
Available from: 2023-11-30 Created: 2023-11-30 Last updated: 2023-12-15
Hauser, S., Redström, J. & Wiltse, H. (2023). The widening rift between aesthetics and ethics in the design of computational things. AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, 38, 227-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The widening rift between aesthetics and ethics in the design of computational things
2023 (English)In: AI & Society: The Journal of Human-Centred Systems and Machine Intelligence, ISSN 0951-5666, E-ISSN 1435-5655, Vol. 38, p. 227-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the face of massively increased technological complexity, it is striking that so many of today’s computational and net- worked things follow design ideals honed decades ago in a much different context. These strong ideals prescribe a presenta- tion of things as useful tools through design and a withdrawal of aspects of their functionality and complexity. Beginning in the mid-twentieth century, we trace this ‘withdrawal program’ as it has persisted in the face of increasing computational complexity. Currently, design is in a dilemma where computational products can be seen as brilliantly designed and engag- ing to use yet can also be considered very problematic in how they support hidden agendas and often seem less than trust- worthy. In this article, we analyse factors shaping this emergent ethical dilemma and reveal the concept of a widening rift between what computational things actually are and do and the ways in which they are presented as things for use. Against this backdrop, we argue that there is a need for a new orientation in design programs to adequately address this deepening rupture between the aesthetics and ethics in the design of computational things. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2023
Keywords
Artificial Intelligence, Human-Computer Interaction, Philosophy, ethics, aesthetics, industrial design, interaction design, design theory
National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-188341 (URN)10.1007/s00146-021-01279-w (DOI)000698535100001 ()2-s2.0-85115645264 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058
Available from: 2021-10-06 Created: 2021-10-06 Last updated: 2023-07-14Bibliographically approved
Neidhardt, A., Wiltse, H. & Croon Fors, A. (2022). Beyond progress: Exploring alternative trajectories for design museums. In: Dan Lockton; Sara Lenzi; Paul Hekkert; Arlene Oak; Juan Sádaba (Ed.), DRS2022: Research papers. Paper presented at DRS2022, Design Research Society International Conference. Bilbao, Spain, June 25 - July 1, 2022. Design Research Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond progress: Exploring alternative trajectories for design museums
2022 (English)In: DRS2022: Research papers / [ed] Dan Lockton; Sara Lenzi; Paul Hekkert; Arlene Oak; Juan Sádaba, Design Research Society, 2022Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How can design museums be disentangled from systems like patriarchy, so that they become able to support change towards more justice? To explore this question, we use our standpoint as design researchers in combination with a feminist perspective. Historically, most design museums supported a path of progress which supposedly leads straight from the past into the future. Even though today attempts to change design museums can be observed, criteria for good design and methods for collecting and exhibiting mainly stay unchanged. However, when questioning them, it becomes clear that they were shaped by a white, male, imperialist perspective. Through shifting focus and leaving the well-trodden path, we identify three possible paths toward envisioning what we call alternative design museums that might contribute to the bigger struggle for changing the design discipline, and shaping a more just world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Design Research Society, 2022
Series
DRS Conference Volumes, ISSN 2398-3132
Keywords
design justice, feminism, design museums, systems
National Category
Design Gender Studies
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-197819 (URN)10.21606/drs.2022.212 (DOI)978-1-91229-457-2 (ISBN)
Conference
DRS2022, Design Research Society International Conference. Bilbao, Spain, June 25 - July 1, 2022
Available from: 2022-07-06 Created: 2022-07-06 Last updated: 2022-09-14Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2022). Maneuvering in the interval: reflections on immanent entanglements [Letter to the editor]. Foundations of Science, 27(3), 915-920
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maneuvering in the interval: reflections on immanent entanglements
2022 (English)In: Foundations of Science, ISSN 1233-1821, E-ISSN 1572-8471, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 915-920Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Both perspective and leverage are needed in order to arrive at a place where it is possible to do the philosophical work required in order to adequately account for our present sociotechnical landscape. One of the key characteristics of this landscape is the collapse of scale, as things become more like fluid assemblages and the economic incentives of surveillance capitalism turn ordinary things into surveillance devices tuned for others’ profit. In this context we need a language not only of imagination and humility in the face of countless gaps between things, but also one of entanglement, care, and response-ability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
National Category
Design Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-181921 (URN)10.1007/s10699-020-09766-x (DOI)000635509800002 ()33821133 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85103423531 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058
Available from: 2021-04-01 Created: 2021-04-01 Last updated: 2022-12-19Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2021). #83 A tuning theory of design[ing]. In: Paul A. Rodgers, Craig Bremner (Ed.), 118 theories of design(ing): (pp. 211-211). Vernon Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>#83 A tuning theory of design[ing]
2021 (English)In: 118 theories of design(ing) / [ed] Paul A. Rodgers, Craig Bremner, Vernon Press , 2021, p. 211-211Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vernon Press, 2021
National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-178891 (URN)9781622739622 (ISBN)9781648891588 (ISBN)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2021-01-20 Created: 2021-01-20 Last updated: 2021-04-26Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2021). #94 A disempowering theory of design[ing]. In: Paul A. Rodgers, Craig Bremner (Ed.), 118 theories of design(ing): (pp. 233-233). Vernon Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>#94 A disempowering theory of design[ing]
2021 (English)In: 118 theories of design(ing) / [ed] Paul A. Rodgers, Craig Bremner, Vernon Press , 2021, p. 233-233Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vernon Press, 2021
National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-178889 (URN)9781622739622 (ISBN)9781648891588 (ISBN)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2021-01-20 Created: 2021-01-20 Last updated: 2021-04-26Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. & Redström, J. (2021). Philosophical Imaginaries for Connected Sociotechnical Realities. In: SPT 2021 - Techological Imaginaries: The Society for Philosophy and Technology Conference - June 28-30 2021. Paper presented at The Society for Philosophy and Technology Conference, June 28-30, 2021, Virtual Conference (pp. 405-405). The Society for Philosophy and Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Philosophical Imaginaries for Connected Sociotechnical Realities
2021 (English)In: SPT 2021 - Techological Imaginaries: The Society for Philosophy and Technology Conference - June 28-30 2021, The Society for Philosophy and Technology , 2021, p. 405-405Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

It is now well-recognized that technologies do not stand on their own and only serve rational, instrumental purposes, but are rather part of complex sociotechnical systems that reflect diverse and complex values, purposes, and power structures. They can also be seen as having their own existence independent of humans, drawing on flat ontology and materialist perspectives. Yet in common sense reasoning around technology, not to mention in its (experience) design, there persists a basic technological imaginary based on technologies as passive tools that humans pick up and put to use in serving their more or less heroic purposes. Now, however, even everyday experience seems to challenge this perspective on technology as strictly submissive tools as we find that what music to listen to next, books to read, movies to watch or products to purchase seem to have been all but already selected for us by the apps and services we use. Indeed, 'becoming part of' is probably a more accurate description than 'using'. 

In order to explore the implications of these changes while also highlighting persistent elements of our collective technological imaginary, we here examine a few classic examples within philosophy of technology through this lens. Playfully reimagining examples such as the hammer, the cane or the clock, what happens if we instead start from the assumption that things possess agencies and intentionalities as important or influential as our own? What if we consider ourselves extensions of the tools we use, rather than the other way around? Here, we aim to sketch the contours of a new kind of philosophical imaginary that might be more relevant for our current sociotechnical reality. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Society for Philosophy and Technology, 2021
Keywords
design, digital, philosophy of technology, philosophical imaginaries
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-186627 (URN)
Conference
The Society for Philosophy and Technology Conference, June 28-30, 2021, Virtual Conference
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058
Available from: 2021-08-16 Created: 2021-08-16 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2020). Data Economy Interfaces: Mediating Relations in Fluid Assemblages. In: EASST4S 2020: Locating and Timing Matters: Significance and Agency of STS in Emerging Worlds. Paper presented at EASST/4S 2020, August 18-21, 2020, Virtual conference. EASST
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Data Economy Interfaces: Mediating Relations in Fluid Assemblages
2020 (English)In: EASST4S 2020: Locating and Timing Matters: Significance and Agency of STS in Emerging Worlds, EASST , 2020Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Everyday connected things have become key sites for the production of behavioral data about people’s lives, enabling corporate actors to predict and control behavior in service of enormous profit under the economic model of surveillance capitalism. This production of data and nudging have come to be primary functions of digital networked technologies. However, when it comes to the design of these things and the ways in which they are presented to end users, it is the utility and experience that are in focus. These other functions of things typically do not come to presence at the level of the interface during use. There has come to be a rift between the way things come to presence and what they actually are, between appearance and function, when it comes to everyday things that are fluid assemblages. This paper will consider conditions needed for a moral economy of data at the level of the interface and interaction, through looking at how they play out (or not) in a series of cases. This opens up the larger question of what is acceptable, which also gets to the core issue of the kinds of relations that are mediated by these kinds of things. The paper ends by considering possible alternatives that can point toward ways of intervening to tune industrial systems and surveillance capitalism toward possible postindustrial futures in which data technologies are used for good of the many rather than profit for the few.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EASST, 2020
Keywords
design, data, data economy, interaction design, science and technology studies, interfaces
National Category
Design Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-174390 (URN)
Conference
EASST/4S 2020, August 18-21, 2020, Virtual conference
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058
Available from: 2020-08-21 Created: 2020-08-21 Last updated: 2020-08-24Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2020). Introduction: relating to things that relate to us. In: Heather Wiltse (Ed.), Relating to things: design, technology and the artificial (pp. 1-12). Bloomsbury Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: relating to things that relate to us
2020 (English)In: Relating to things: design, technology and the artificial / [ed] Heather Wiltse, Bloomsbury Academic, 2020, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bloomsbury Academic, 2020
Keywords
design, technology, artificial, philosophy of technology, surveillance capitalism
National Category
Design Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
design; human-computer interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-171153 (URN)10.5040/9781350124288.ch-00I (DOI)9781350124257 (ISBN)9781350124288 (ISBN)9781350124271 (ISBN)
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2020-05-27 Created: 2020-05-27 Last updated: 2020-09-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Relating to Things that Relate to Us [F17-1365:1_RJ]; Umeå University; Publications
Wiltse, H. (2020). Introduction: relating to things that relate to us. In: Heather Wiltse (Ed.), Relating to things: design, technology and the artificial (pp. 1-12). Bloomsbury AcademicWiltse, H. (Ed.). (2020). Relating to things: design, technology and the artificial. Bloomsbury AcademicWiltse, H. (2020). Revealing relations of fluid assemblages. In: Heather Wiltse (Ed.), Relating to things: design, technology and the artificial (pp. 239-255). Bloomsbury Academic
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0566-2527

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