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Redström, J. & Wiltse, H. (2019). Changing Things: Innovation through Design Philosophy. In: Academy for Design Innovation Management Conference 2019: Research Perspectives in the Era of Transformations. Paper presented at Academy for Design Innovation Management Conference 2019: Research Perspectives in the Era of Transformations, London, UK, June 18-21, 2019. London: Loughborough University,
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing Things: Innovation through Design Philosophy
2019 (English)In: Academy for Design Innovation Management Conference 2019: Research Perspectives in the Era of Transformations, London: Loughborough University, , 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Digital networked technologies are currently at the forefront of contemporary innovation, driving changes in sociotechnical practices across industrial sectors and in everyday life. Yet technical innovation has been outpacing our capacity to make sense of these technologies and the fundamental changes associated with them. This sense-making enterprise is the focus of our current research in developing a design philosophy for changing things. We describe a conceptual framework developed around the concept of things as fluid assemblages to investigate and articulate what is going on with things, and how their development might be (re)directed toward preferable futures. Specifically, we here examine the important role of design philosophy in innovation, using the conceptual framework developed as a way to point toward potential sites for innovation in the current sociotechnical landscape. The line of investigation we pursue suggests that doing philosophy should become a central part of innovative design practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Loughborough University,, 2019
Keywords
design, innovation, design theory, design philosophy, computational, fluid assemblages
National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161428 (URN)
Conference
Academy for Design Innovation Management Conference 2019: Research Perspectives in the Era of Transformations, London, UK, June 18-21, 2019
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2017.0058
Available from: 2019-07-08 Created: 2019-07-08 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2019). Surveillance (Alternatives), by Design. In: Andrea Krajewski, Max Krüger (Ed.), The State of Responsible IoT 2019: Small Escapes from Surveillance Capitalism (pp. 53-58). Berlin: ThingsCon e.V.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surveillance (Alternatives), by Design
2019 (English)In: The State of Responsible IoT 2019: Small Escapes from Surveillance Capitalism / [ed] Andrea Krajewski, Max Krüger, Berlin: ThingsCon e.V. , 2019, p. 53-58Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: ThingsCon e.V., 2019
Keywords
design, IoT, surveillance capitalism, design philosophy
National Category
Design Media and Communication Technology Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166934 (URN)
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW 2017.0058
Available from: 2020-01-07 Created: 2020-01-07 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved
Rodgers, P., Innella, G., Bremner, C., Coxon, I., Broadley, C., Cadamuro, A., . . . Winton, E. (2019). The Lancaster Care Charter. Design Issues, 35(1), 73-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Lancaster Care Charter
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2019 (English)In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2019
National Category
Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155377 (URN)10.1162/desi_a_00522 (DOI)000454596600007 ()
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2019). The Smartphone: Digital Mediation Through Fluid Assemblages. In: : . Paper presented at 4S 2019: Innovations, Interruptions, Regenerations : Society for Social Studies of Science annual meeting, New Orleans, September 4-7, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Smartphone: Digital Mediation Through Fluid Assemblages
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

There is much exciting work being done at the intersection between media theory and STS. As objects become ‘smart,’ as in the Internet of Things, smart homes, and smart cities, they will continue to shape our knowledge of the objectified world we have constructed since at least the 18th century. Contra McLuhan, but in line with the recent work of John Durham Peters, the human body becomes medium; and scientific knowledge is dependent on novel and emerging mechanisms of (prosthetic) sensation and perception that allow for the observation of phenomena. This panel brings together scholars working in this emerging area to explore how attention to media theory can inform STS and how STS can inform the study of media theory.

We invite scholars from the fields of media studies and science and technology studies to engage in theoretically and empirically informed dialogues, which investigate and define the relationship(s) between media formats and the production of knowledge in both contemporary and historical periods. Our goal in convening this panel is to set an agenda for the productive mingling of these fields towards an understanding of the epistemologies and possible practices that are embedded in the media-objects with which we engage. In short: to know knowledge-as-mediation, and mediation-as-knowledge. Each panelist is invited to bring one object (slide, film clip, written excerpt, piece of technology …) which for them operates in both media theory and STS. After a short presentation of each object, a panel discussion will ensue.

Keywords
media, STS, smartphone, design, fluid assemblages, design philosophy
National Category
Media Studies Design
Research subject
design; media and communication studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166916 (URN)
Conference
4S 2019: Innovations, Interruptions, Regenerations : Society for Social Studies of Science annual meeting, New Orleans, September 4-7, 2019
Projects
Design Philosophy for Things That Change
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2017.0058
Note

Part of: Media Theory Meets STS - Roundtable

Available from: 2020-01-07 Created: 2020-01-07 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Redström, J. & Wiltse, H. (2018). Changing things: the future of objects in a digital world. London: Bloomsbury Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing things: the future of objects in a digital world
2018 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many of the things we now live with do not take a purely physical form. Objects such as smart phones, laptops and wearable fitness trackers are different from our things of the past. These new digital forms are networked, dynamic and contextually configured. They can be changeable and unpredictable, even inscrutable when it comes to understanding what they actually do and whom they really serve.

In this compelling new volume, Johan Redstrom and Heather Wiltse address critical questions that have assumed a fresh urgency in the context of these rapidly-developing forms. Drawing on critical traditions from a range of disciplines that have been used to understand the nature of things, they develop a new vocabulary and a theoretical approach that allows us to account for and address the multi-faceted, dynamic, constantly evolving forms and functions of contemporary things. In doing so, the book prototypes a new design discourse around everyday things, and describes them as fluid assemblages.

Redstrom and Wiltse explore how a new theoretical framework could enable a richer understanding of things as fluid and networked, with a case study of the evolution of music players culminating in an in-depth discussion of Spotify. Other contemporary 'things' touched on in their analysis include smart phones and watches, as well as digital platforms and applications such as Google, Facebook and Twitter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018. p. 181
Keywords
design, design theory, philosophy, philosophy of technology, digital, things, objects, fluid assemblages
National Category
Design Philosophy Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152785 (URN)9781350004351 (ISBN)9781350004344 (ISBN)9781350004337 (ISBN)
Funder
Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2017.0058
Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2018). Conceptualizing digital mediations. In: : . Paper presented at Human-Technology Relations, University of Twente, The Netherlands, July 11-13, 2018 (pp. 102-102). University of Twente
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptualizing digital mediations
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Postphenomenology provides a productive framework for thinking through technological mediation. However, understanding digital mediations in particular requires further development and expansion of its conceptual toolkit, even as the orientation in postphenomenology toward ’the ways in which we are present in our world and the world is present to us’ (Verbeek 2005) highlights the very real mediations of these not-only-virtual technologies. In order to unpack the ways in which digital technologies can mediate perception and engagement by making activities visible, I have developed a conceptualization of digital material mediation involving substrates and traces (Wiltse 2014) . The ways in which digital technologies now often configure themselves in relation to particular users calls for analytic sensitivity to multiinstability (Redström and Wiltse 2015). Building on a conceptualization of digital networked things as fluid assemblages (Wiltse, Stolterman and Redström 2015;; Redström and Wiltse 2015), multiintentionality (Wiltse 2017) points to the multiple intentional relations involved in these things, including reverse intentionality in which use of a thing is a means for other actors to find out more about the one doing the using. This is the model of dataveillance in a contemporary context in which data is the resource fuelling social, economic, and governance processes. An incisive conceptualization of digital mediations is needed to understand and articulate the role they now play in not only experience, but also in distributions of power and agency, visibility and invisibility—and to provide insight on how to design in order to better care for their consequences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Twente, 2018
Keywords
postphenomenology, design, digital, mediation, human-technology relations, philosophy of technology
National Category
Philosophy
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150427 (URN)
Conference
Human-Technology Relations, University of Twente, The Netherlands, July 11-13, 2018
Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2020-03-03Bibliographically approved
B. Torretta, N., Wiltse, H. & Sanchez de La Barquera, X. (2018). Who gets to situate design? Reflections from engaging with diversity in design. In: EASST2018:: Meetings: Making Science, Technology and Society together. Paper presented at EASST2018 - Making Science, Technology and Society together, Lancaster University, England, July 25-28, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who gets to situate design? Reflections from engaging with diversity in design
2018 (English)In: EASST2018:: Meetings: Making Science, Technology and Society together, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The current unsustainability crises have called on design to pay greater attention to the social, political, cultural and environmental dynamics of designing. These include the processes, relations, consequences, and response-abilities of design. As design practices continue to move out of the studio and engage with 'the social', the character of these design practices and their relation to the contexts in which they operate come into focus. The basic orientation of design—to approach with an intention to bring about change—can strongly activate and reveal the colonial ethos of design in these contexts, and raise questions of how to navigate different and even incommensurable value systems and types of knowledge. These issues are brought into sharp relief in our current project of working with Sami people in a project that is part of an advanced professional industrial design education. The project is motivated by an ambition to challenge ourselves and our students to open up to change through engaging with diversity. These engagements have required those involved to rethink their worldviews, values and understanding of knowledge. Situating design in this context, we must also ask: at what point does situating become imposing? Who gets to situate? Who are we to suggest something to this community as outsiders? Who gets to decide value? What does design have to offer? And, more hopefully: how might we shift from imposing our methods and values to a more transformational process of learning to design (and live) together, negotiating and sharing through an interweaving of partial perspectives?

National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153794 (URN)
Conference
EASST2018 - Making Science, Technology and Society together, Lancaster University, England, July 25-28, 2018
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2020-03-06Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2017). Care is expensive. In: Does Design Care...?: An International Workshop of Design Thought and Action. Paper presented at Does Design Care...? An International Workshop of Design Thought and Action, Imagination, Lancaster University, 12–13 September, 2017 (pp. 79-83).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Care is expensive
2017 (English)In: Does Design Care...?: An International Workshop of Design Thought and Action, 2017, p. 79-83Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
care
National Category
Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142374 (URN)
Conference
Does Design Care...? An International Workshop of Design Thought and Action, Imagination, Lancaster University, 12–13 September, 2017
Available from: 2017-11-28 Created: 2017-11-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Michelfelder, D. P., Wellner, G. & Wiltse, H. (2017). Designing differently: toward a methodology for an ethics of feminist technology design. In: Sven Ove Hansson (Ed.), The ethics of technology: methods and approaches (pp. 193-218). London: Rowman & Littlefield International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing differently: toward a methodology for an ethics of feminist technology design
2017 (English)In: The ethics of technology: methods and approaches / [ed] Sven Ove Hansson, London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017, p. 193-218Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017
Series
Philosophy, Technology and Society
Keywords
methodology, gender, feminist, technology, design, engineering, ethics, feminist ethics, feminist technoscience
National Category
Ethics Design
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-134366 (URN)978-1-7834-8657-1 (ISBN)978-1-7834-8658-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Wiltse, H. (2017). Mediating (Infra)structures: Technology, Media, Environment. In: Yoni Van Den Eede, Stacy O'Neal Irwin, Galit Wellner (Ed.), Postphenomenology and media: essays on human-media-world relations (pp. 3-25). Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediating (Infra)structures: Technology, Media, Environment
2017 (English)In: Postphenomenology and media: essays on human-media-world relations / [ed] Yoni Van Den Eede, Stacy O'Neal Irwin, Galit Wellner, Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books, 2017, p. 3-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books, 2017
National Category
Philosophy Media Studies
Research subject
design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137261 (URN)978-1-4985-5014-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-06-28 Created: 2017-06-28 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Projects
Relating to Things that Relate to Us [F17-1365:1_RJ]; Umeå University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0566-2527

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