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Nystedt, Astrid
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Nystedt, A. & Hildingsson, I. (2018). Women’s and men’s negative experience of child birth: A cross-sectional survey. Women and Birth, 31(2), 103-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women’s and men’s negative experience of child birth: A cross-sectional survey
2018 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A negative birth experience may influence both women and men and can limit their process of becoming a parent.

Aims: This study aimed to analyze and describe women's and men's perceptions and experiences of childbirth.

Design: A cross-sectional study of women and their partners living in one Swedish county were recruited in mid pregnancy and followed up two months after birth. Women (n = 928) and men (n = 818) completed the same questionnaire that investigated new parents' birth experiences in relation to sociodemographic background and birth related variables.

Results: Women (6%) and men (3%) with a negative birth experiences, experienced longer labours and more often emergency caesarean section compared to women (94%) and men (97%) with a positive birth experience. The obstetric factors that contributed most strongly to a negative birth experience were emergency caesarean and was found in women (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.0-10.8) and men (OR 4.5, Cl 95% 1.4-17.3). In addition, pain intensity and elective caesarean section were also associated with a negative birth experiences in women. Feelings during birth such as agreeing with the statement; 'It was a pain to give birth' were a strong contributing factor for both women and men.

Conclusions: A negative birth experience is associated with obstetric factors such as emergency caesarean section and negative feelings. The content of negative feelings differed between women and men. It is important to take into account that their feelings differ in order to facilitate the processing of the negative birth experience for both partners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Childbirth experience, Negative birth experience, Men's birth experience, Women's birth experience
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146424 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2017.07.002 (DOI)000427813500016 ()28789827 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-08 Created: 2018-05-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hildingsson, I., Haines, H., Karlstrom, A. & Nystedt, A. (2017). Presence and process of fear of birth during pregnancy - Findings from a longitudinal cohort study. Women and Birth, 30(5), E242-E247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Presence and process of fear of birth during pregnancy - Findings from a longitudinal cohort study
2017 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 30, no 5, p. E242-E247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The prevalence of fear of birth has been estimated between 8–30%, but there is considerable heterogeneity in research design, definitions, measurement tools used and populations. There are some inconclusive findings about the stability of childbirth fear.

Aim: to assess the prevalence and characteristics of women presenting with scores ≥60 on FOBS-The Fear of Birth Scale, in mid and late pregnancy, and to study change in fear of birth and associated factors.

Methods: A prospective longitudinal cohort study of a one-year cohort of 1212 pregnant women from a northern part of Sweden, recruited in mid pregnancy and followed up in late pregnancy. Fear of birth was assessed using FOBS-The fear of birth scale, with the cut off at ≥60.

Findings: The prevalence of fear of birth was 22% in mid pregnancy and 19% in late pregnancy, a statistically significant decrease. Different patterns were found where some women presented with increased fear and some with decreased fear. The women who experienced more fear or less fear later in pregnancy could not be differentiated by background factors.

Conclusions: More research is needed to explore factors important to reduce fear of childbirth and the optimal time to measure it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017
Keywords
Fear, Birth, Pregnancy, Counseling, Change
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142275 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2017.02.003 (DOI)000414350100002 ()28279636 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Karlström, A., Nystedt, A. & Hildingsson, I. (2015). The meaning of a very positive birth experience: focus groups discussions with women. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15, Article ID 251.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The meaning of a very positive birth experience: focus groups discussions with women
2015 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, article id 251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The experience of giving birth has long-term implications for a woman’s health and wellbeing. The birth experience and satisfaction with birth have been associated with several factors and emotional dimensions of care and been shown to influence women’s overall assessment. Individualized emotional support has been shown to empower women and increase the possibility of a positive birth experience. How women assess their experience and the factors that contribute to a positive birth experience are of importance for midwives and other caregivers. The aim of this study was to describe women’s experience of a very positive birth experience.

Method: The study followed a qualitative descriptive design. Twenty-six women participated in focus group discussions 6–7 years after a birth they had assessed as very positive. At the time of the birth, they had all taken part in a large prospective longitudinal cohort study performed in northern Sweden. In the present study, thematic analysis was used to review the transcribed data.

Results: All women looked back very positively on their birth experience. Two themes and six sub-themes were identified that described the meaning of a very positive birth experience. Women related their experience to internal (e.g., their own ability and strength) and external (e.g., a trustful and respectful relationship with the midwife) factors. A woman’s sense of trust and support from the father of the child was also important. The feeling of safety promoted by a supportive environment was essential for gaining control during birth and for focusing on techniques that enabled the women to manage labour.

Conclusion: It is an essential part of midwifery care to build relationships with women where mutual trust in one another’s competence is paramount. The midwife is the active guide through pregnancy and birth and should express a strong belief in a woman’s ability to give birth. Midwives are required to inform, encourage and to provide the tools to enable birth, making it important for midwives to invite the partner to be part of a team, in which everyone works together for the benefit of the woman and child.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
[Karlstrom, Annika; Hildingsson, Ingegerd] Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Nursing, SE-70 Sundsvall, Sweden. [Nystedt, Astrid] Umea Univ, Dept Nursing, Umea, Sweden. [Hildingsson, Ingegerd] Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden.: , 2015
Keywords
Focus groups, Positive birth experience, Thematic analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-110994 (URN)10.1186/s12884-015-0683-0 (DOI)000362474300001 ()26453022 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-02 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nystedt, A., Edvardsson, D. & Willman, A. (2005). To Mander R (2004) commentary on Nystedt et al. (2004). Journal of Clinical Nursing, 14(7), 911-911
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To Mander R (2004) commentary on Nystedt et al. (2004)
2005 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 911-911Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-19045 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2005.01118.x (DOI)000230291200018 ()16000108 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-03 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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