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Wahlström, V., Bergman, F., Öhberg, F., Eskilsson, T., Olsson, T. & Slunga-Järvholm, L. (2019). Effects of a multicomponent physical activity promoting program on sedentary behavior, physical activity and body measures: a longitudinal study in different office types. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, Article ID 3808.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a multicomponent physical activity promoting program on sedentary behavior, physical activity and body measures: a longitudinal study in different office types
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, article id 3808Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate effects of a multicomponent program promoting physical activity on sedentary behavior, physical activity, and body measures, when relocating from cell offices to either a flex or cell office. Methods The Active Office Design (AOD) study is a longitudinal non-randomized controlled study performed in a municipality in northern Sweden. A subsample of 86 participants were randomly recruited from the AOD study to objectively measure sedentary behavior and physical activity, using ActivPAL and ActiGraph, before and after relocation to the two different office types. The multicomponent program promoting physical activity was performed in both offices. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. Results Eighteen months after relocation, the total number of steps per work day increased by 21% in the flex office and 3% in the cell office group, compared to baseline. Moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during work hours increased by 42% in the flex office group and 19% in the cell office group. No changes were seen regarding sitting time at work. Small additive effects for walking and MVPA were seen for both groups during non-work time. Weight increased in the flex office group. Conclusions This long-term study shows that a multicomponent workplace intervention can lead to increased walking time, steps, and MVPA in a flex compared to a cell office. Small additive increases of physical activity were seen during non-work time in both groups. More long-term controlled studies are needed to confirm these results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
the Nordic Association of Occupational Safety and Health (NOROSH), 2019
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157427 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3808 (DOI)30860269 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-06-24
Wahlström, V., Bergman, F., Öhberg, F., Stenlund, T., Olsson, T. & Slunga-Järvholm, L. (2018). A longitudinal study of physical activity in different office types. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 15(10), S62-S62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of physical activity in different office types
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, E-ISSN 1543-5474, Vol. 15, no 10, p. S62-S62Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152984 (URN)000446516100206 ()
Funder
AFA Insurance
Note

Supplement: 1

Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved
Malmberg Gavelin, H., Eskilsson, T., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Josefsson, M., Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Slunga Järvholm, L. (2018). Rehabilitation for improved cognition in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder: RECO – a randomized clinical trial. Stress, 21(4), 279-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rehabilitation for improved cognition in patients with stress-related exhaustion disorder: RECO – a randomized clinical trial
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2018 (English)In: Stress, ISSN 1025-3890, E-ISSN 1607-8888, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 279-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stress-related exhaustion has been associated with selective and enduring cognitive impairments. However, little is known about how to address cognitive deficits in stress rehabilitation and how this influences stress recovery over time. The aim of this open-label, parallel randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03073772) was to investigate the long-term effects of 12 weeks cognitive or aerobic training on cognitive function, psychological health and work ability for patients diagnosed with exhaustion disorder (ED). One-hundred-and-thirty-two patients (111 women) participating in multimodal stress rehabilitation were randomized to receive additional cognitive training (n = 44), additional aerobic training (n = 47) or no additional training (n = 41). Treatment effects were assessed before, immediately after and one-year post intervention. The primary outcome was global cognitive function. Secondary outcomes included domain-specific cognition, self-reported burnout, depression, anxiety, fatigue and work ability, aerobic capacity and sick-leave levels. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed a small but lasting improvement in global cognitive functioning for the cognitive training group, paralleled by a large improvement on a trained updating task. The aerobic training group showed improvements in aerobic capacity and episodic memory immediately after training, but no long-term benefits. General improvements in psychological health and work ability were observed, with no difference between interventional groups. Our findings suggest that cognitive training may be a viable method to address cognitive impairments for patients with ED, whereas the effects of aerobic exercise on cognition may be more limited when performed during a restricted time period. The implications for clinical practice in supporting patients with ED to adhere to treatment are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
burnout, stress rehabilitation, cognitive training, aerobic training, exhaustion disorder, randomized controlled trial
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147074 (URN)10.1080/10253890.2018.1461833 (DOI)000442694000001 ()29693483 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-0772Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-2056Swedish Social Insurance Agency, 99368-2009/RS09Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Eskilsson, T., Slunga Järvholm, L., Malmberg Gavelin, H., Stigsdotter Neely, A. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2017). Aerobic training for improved memory in patients with stress-related exhaustion: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Psychiatry, 17(1), Article ID 322.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aerobic training for improved memory in patients with stress-related exhaustion: a randomized controlled trial
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2017 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patients with stress-related exhaustion suffer from cognitive impairments, which often remain after psychological treatment or work place interventions. It is important to find effective treatments that can address this problem. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects on cognitive performance and psychological variables of a 12-week aerobic training program performed at a moderate-vigorous intensity for patients with exhaustion disorder who participated in a multimodal rehabilitation program.

METHODS: In this open-label, parallel, randomized and controlled trial, 88 patients diagnosed with exhaustion disorder participated in a 24-week multimodal rehabilitation program. After 12 weeks in the program the patients were randomized to either a 12-week aerobic training intervention or to a control group with no additional training. Primary outcome measure was cognitive function, and secondary outcome measures were psychological health variables and aerobic capacity.

RESULTS: In total, 51% patients in the aerobic training group and 78% patients in the control group completed the intervention period. The aerobic training group significantly improved in maximal oxygen uptake and episodic memory performance. No additional improvement in burnout, depression or anxiety was observed in the aerobic group compared with controls.

CONCLUSION: Aerobic training at a moderate-vigorous intensity within a multimodal rehabilitation program for patients with exhaustion disorder facilitated episodic memory. A future challenge would be the clinical implementation of aerobic training and methods to increase feasibility in this patient group.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03073772 . Retrospectively registered 21 February 2017.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Anxiety, Burnout, Cognition, Depression, Episodic memory, Exercise
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139777 (URN)10.1186/s12888-017-1457-1 (DOI)000409560600001 ()28865430 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-22 Created: 2017-09-22 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Eskilsson, T., Lehti, A., Sturesson, M. & Ståhlnacke, B.-M. (2017). Metodstöd ADA+: ArbetsplatsDialog för Arbetsåtergång : planering, uppföljning och stöd. Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metodstöd ADA+: ArbetsplatsDialog för Arbetsåtergång : planering, uppföljning och stöd
2017 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2017. p. 48
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148200 (URN)9789176018125 (ISBN)
Projects
Strukturerad metod för hälso- och sjukvård, som främjar dialog mellan arbetsgivare och patient för att förbättra återgång i arbete vid psykisk ohälsa
Funder
AFA Insurance, 150274
Available from: 2018-05-30 Created: 2018-05-30 Last updated: 2019-08-26Bibliographically approved
Malmberg Gavelin, H., Stigsdotter Neely, A., Andersson, M., Eskilsson, T., Slunga Järvholm, L. & Boraxbekk, C.-J. (2017). Neural activation in stress-related exhaustion: cross-sectional observations and interventional effects. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 269, 17-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural activation in stress-related exhaustion: cross-sectional observations and interventional effects
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2017 (English)In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 269, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the association between burnout and neural activation during working memory processing in patients with stress-related exhaustion. Additionally, we investigated the neural effects of cognitive training as part of stress rehabilitation. Fifty-five patients with clinical diagnosis of exhaustion disorder were administered the n-back task during fMRI scanning at baseline. Ten patients completed a 12-week cognitive training intervention, as an addition to stress rehabilitation. Eleven patients served as a treatment-as-usual control group. At baseline, burnout level was positively associated with neural activation in the rostral prefrontal cortex, the posterior parietal cortex and the striatum, primarily in the 2-back condition. Following stress rehabilitation, the striatal activity decreased as a function of improved levels of burnout. No significant association between burnout level and working memory performance was found, however, our findings indicate that frontostriatal neural responses related to working memory were modulated by burnout severity. We suggest that patients with high levels of burnout need to recruit additional cognitive resources to uphold task performance. Following cognitive training, increased neural activation was observed during 3-back in working memory-related regions, including the striatum, however, low sample size limits any firm conclusions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Clare: Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Working memory fMRI, Burnout, Stress rehabilitation, Exhaustion disorder, Cognitive training
National Category
Neurosciences Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-139932 (URN)10.1016/j.pscychresns.2017.08.008 (DOI)000412461700003 ()28917154 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Malmberg Gavelin, H., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Stenlund, T., Lisbeth, S. J. & Stigsdotter Neely, A. (2015). Effects of a process-based cognitive training intervention for patients with stress-related exhaustion. Stress, 18(5), 578-588
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a process-based cognitive training intervention for patients with stress-related exhaustion
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2015 (English)In: Stress, ISSN 1025-3890, E-ISSN 1607-8888, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 578-588Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stress-related exhaustion has been linked to a pattern of selective cognitive impairments, mainly affecting executive functioning, attention and episodic memory. Little is known about potential treatments of these cognitive deficits. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a process-based cognitive training intervention, designed to target the specific cognitive impairments associated with stress-related exhaustion. To this end, patients diagnosed with exhaustion disorder (ED) were randomized to either a multimodal stress rehabilitation program with the addition of a process-based cognitive training intervention (training group, n = 27) or a treatment-as-usual control condition, consisting of multimodal stress rehabilitation with no additional training (control group, n = 32). Treatment effects were evaluated through an extensive cognitive test battery, assessing both near- and far transfer effects, as well as self-report forms regarding subjective cognitive complaints and burnout levels. Results showed pronounced training-related improvements on the criterion updating task (p < 0.001). Further, evidence was found of selective near transfer effects to updating (p = 0.01) and episodic memory (p = 0.04). Also, the trained group reported less subjective memory complaints (p = 0.02) and levels of burnout decreased for both groups, but more so for the trained group (p = 0.04), following the intervention. These findings suggest that process-based cognitive training may be a viable method to address the cognitive impairments associated with ED.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
Keywords
burnout, cognition, executive function, exhaustion disorder, stress rehabilitation, working memory training
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111130 (URN)10.3109/10253890.2015.1064892 (DOI)000369888600011 ()26305186 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-06 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Malmberg Gavelin, H., Boraxbekk, C.-J., Stenlund, T., Slunga Järvholm, L. & Stigsdotter Neely, A. (2015). Effects of a process-based cognitive training intervention for patients with stress-related exhaustion: a randomized clinical trial. In: International Convention of Psychological Science, Amsterdam: . Paper presented at International Convention of Psychological Science, Amsterdam, March 12-14, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a process-based cognitive training intervention for patients with stress-related exhaustion: a randomized clinical trial
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2015 (English)In: International Convention of Psychological Science, Amsterdam, 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The present study evaluated whether a computerized process-based cognitive training program improves cognitive function in patients with stress-related exhaustion (n=59). Results showed training effects that were generalizable beyond the specific training tasks, suggesting that cognitive training may be a viable part of the rehabilitation of stress-related exhaustion.

Keywords
Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-111171 (URN)
Conference
International Convention of Psychological Science, Amsterdam, March 12-14, 2015
Available from: 2015-11-06 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Sonntag-Öström, E., Stenlund, T., Nordin, M., Lundell, Y., Ahlgren, C., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., . . . Dolling, A. (2015). “Nature's effect on my mind”: patients’ qualitative experiences of a forest-based rehabilitation programme. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 14(3), 607-614
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Nature's effect on my mind”: patients’ qualitative experiences of a forest-based rehabilitation programme
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2015 (English)In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 607-614Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the personal experiences and perceived effects on mind from visits to forest environments in a subset of patients with severe exhaustion disorder (ED), who participated in a randomized controlled trial for evaluation of forest-based rehabilitation.

Participants: A subsample of 19 patients with diagnosed ED, who completed the three-month forest-based rehabilitation programme in the ForRest project, was interviewed. Method: The forest-based rehabilitation consisted of repeated forest visits with the main objective of spending time in rest and solitude in a chosen forest setting. Semi-structured interviews were carried out and analysed using Grounded Theory.

Result: A core category and five subcategories were set up to describe the patients’ experiences and development during the forest-based rehabilitation. As patients mostly reported that they strove to achieve peace of mind during the forest visits, Striving for serenity was chosen to be the core category. At first the patients were frustrated when left alone with their own thoughts in an unfamiliar forest environment. They gradually became familiar with the forest environments and also found their favourite places where they experienced peace of mind. They were then able to rest and begin reflective thinking about their life situation, which led to ambitions to change it.The preferred forest environments were characterised by openness, light and a good view, and were felt to be undemanding, peaceful and stimulating.

Conclusion: Visits to the forest provided favourite places for rest, were experienced as restorative, seemed to improved reflection and may have contributed to starting the coping process for these patients. However, forest visits, as the only treatment option, are not sufficient as rehabilitation from severe and long-term ED. We suggest that forest visits should be integrated with cognitive behavioural therapy to further improve the recovery and enhance coping in daily life for these patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
burnout, coping, favorite place, mood, well being, nature-assisted therapy
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-107105 (URN)10.1016/j.ufug.2015.06.002 (DOI)000363069400018 ()
Available from: 2015-08-18 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Sonntag-Öström, E., Stenlund, T., Nordin, M., Lundell, Y., Ahlgren, C., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., . . . Dolling, A. (2015). "Nature's effect on my mind". Patients' experiences of nature based rehabilitation: a qualitative inquiry.. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 14(3), 607-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Nature's effect on my mind". Patients' experiences of nature based rehabilitation: a qualitative inquiry.
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2015 (English)In: Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, E-ISSN 1610-8167, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 607-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
burnout, city, human health, nature, psychophysiology, recovery
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92564 (URN)
Available from: 2014-08-28 Created: 2014-08-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2402-562x

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