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Jansson, Lilian
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Hallgren Graneheim, U., Jansson, L. & Lindgren, B.-M. (2015). Hovering between Heaven and Hell: An Observational Study Focusing on the Interactions between One Woman with Schizophrenia, Dementia, and Challenging Behaviour and her Care Providers. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 36(7), 543-550
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hovering between Heaven and Hell: An Observational Study Focusing on the Interactions between One Woman with Schizophrenia, Dementia, and Challenging Behaviour and her Care Providers
2015 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 543-550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This case study aims to illuminate the interactions between one woman (Alice) with schizophrenia, dementia, and challenging behaviour and her professional caregivers. We performed participant observations of these interactions and conducted informal interviews at the residential home where the woman lived. The transcripts were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the interactions between Alice and her caregivers were experienced as hovering between heaven and hell. Alice struggled to bring order into her chaotic life world by splitting herself and others, and her caregivers struggled to protect Alice's and their own dignity by limiting her challenging behaviours. They also strived to understand their own and Alice's behaviour. Current practice in caring for people with challenging behaviour usually focuses on symptom reduction through medication and behavioural modification. Instead, we suggest moving toward an understanding of the experiences behind the challenging behaviours and designing person-centred care based on each patients' reality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
National Category
Nursing Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109964 (URN)10.3109/01612840.2015.1007540 (DOI)000361335900009 ()26309174 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Ringnér, A., Jansson, L. & Hällgren Graneheim, U. (2011). Parental experiences of information within pediatric oncology. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 28(4), 244-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental experiences of information within pediatric oncology
2011 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 244-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parents of children with cancer use information to create knowledge about their child's disease. Information can help parents reduce chaos and create a feeling of control, but there are often obstacles to its acquisition, which has been described as similar to learning a new language. The purpose of this study was to describe parents' experiences of acquiring and using information to create knowledge about their child's cancer during the course of the illness. The authors used qualitative content analysis on data from focus groups and individual interviews with 14 parents of children with cancer. Two themes were constructed: (a) feeling acknowledged as a person of significance included feeling safe and secure in spite of uncertainty, having one's hopes supported, and getting relief from other families' experiences; (b) feeling like an unwelcome guest included feeling abandoned at important milestones, feeling forced to nag for information, and feeling burdened by the obligation to inform others. Parents may need extra attention at important milestones such as treatment cessation, with information meetings grounded in the parents' own needs.

Keywords
Content analysis, focus group interviews, individual interviews, information, parental experiences, pediatric oncology
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46355 (URN)10.1177/1043454211409587 (DOI)21653912 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-04-12 Created: 2011-08-31 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ringnér, A., Jansson, L. & Hällgren Graneheim, U. (2011). Parental experiences of information within pediatric oncology. In: : . Paper presented at European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, 23-27 September 2011, Stockholm, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental experiences of information within pediatric oncology
2011 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Keywords
information, parents, focus group interviews, qualitative content analysis, experiences, information, föräldrar, fokusgruppsintervjuer, kvalitativ innehållsanalys, erfarenheter
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
caring sciences in social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-48037 (URN)10.1016/S0959-8049(11)71380-6 (DOI)
Conference
European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, 23-27 September 2011, Stockholm, Sweden
Projects
Information till föräldrar som har barn med cancer
Note

Postern är även publicerad i tidskriften European Journal of Cancer Vol. 47, Supplement1, sid.312.

Available from: 2011-10-07 Created: 2011-10-06 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ringnér, A., Jansson, L. & Hällgren Graneheim, U. (2011). Professional caregivers' perceptions of providing information to parents of children with cancer. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 28(1), 34-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional caregivers' perceptions of providing information to parents of children with cancer
2011 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Information has been described as a critical part of the care for parents of children with cancer, but not much is known about how caregivers makes decisions about informing parents. This study aims to illuminate professional caregivers' perceptions of providing information to parents of children with cancer. Twenty caregivers at a Swedish pediatric oncology ward participated in four focus group interviews. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Two themes were found: Matching the amount of information to the parents' needs concerned situations where the amount of information provided according to the caregivers' assessment is deemed too small, appropriate, or too large. Navigating through a vague structure dealt with a disrupted setting, unclear responsibilities within the team, difficult timing, unintelligible information, and underused tools for communication. Implications for intervention development are discussed.

Keywords
caregivers’ perceptions, content analysis, focus groups, information to parents, pediatric oncology
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
caring sciences in social sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-38839 (URN)10.1177/1043454210377175 (DOI)20841445 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-04-12 Created: 2011-01-03 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Forsner, M., Jansson, L. & Söderberg, A. (2009). Afraid of medical care school-aged children's narratives about medical fear.. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 24(6), 519-528
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Afraid of medical care school-aged children's narratives about medical fear.
2009 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 519-528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fear can be problematic for children who come into contact with medical care. This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being afraid when in contact with medical care, as narrated by children 7-11 years old. Nine children participated in the study, which applied a phenomenological hermeneutic analysis methodology. The children experienced medical care as "being threatened by a monster," but the possibility of breaking this spell of fear was also mediated. The findings indicate the important role of being emotionally hurt in a child's fear to create, together with the child, an alternate narrative of overcoming this fear.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-30061 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2009.08.003 (DOI)19931150 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-12-02 Created: 2009-12-02 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Franzén, C., Björnstig, U., Jansson, L., Stenlund, H. & Brulin, C. (2008). Injured road users' experience of care in the emergency department. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 17(6), 726-734
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injured road users' experience of care in the emergency department
Show others...
2008 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 726-734Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To describe the patients' perceptions of quality of care (QoC) in an emergency department (ED) and to analyse associations between patients' background characteristics and estimated QoC.

BACKGROUND: Each year 1.4 out of every 100 inhabitants are injured in the traffic environment and receive care at the ED. No study has yet analysed different injured road users' perceived QoC, or how important they rate different caring dimensions.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study at the ED, in the University Hospital in Umeå, Sweden.

METHOD: A stratified consecutive sample of 166 car occupants, 200 cyclists and 199 pedestrians, aged 18-70 years, all injured in the traffic environment. Data were collected from medical records and from a mail survey using a short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire, modified for ED use. The statistical methods used included Mann-Whitney's U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and multiple logistic regression.

RESULTS: The perceived QoC and the subjective importance of the corresponding QoC dimensions were rated at the 'better' half of the rating scale, with no differences between the different road user categories. The most prominent factors associated with a positive perceived QoC rating were a short waiting time, moderate or serious injuries and high age as well as high educational level of the injury victim. For the subjective importance, a short waiting time was rated as the most important but slight differences were seen, related to education and sex.

CONCLUSION: The association patterns between the areas of perceived reality and subjective importance indicated that expectations were higher than perceived QoC, suggesting that patients expected somewhat higher QoC than they received.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Information on factors causing long waiting times, adapted to patients' age, sex and educational level, may reduce dissatisfaction among long waiting patients, especially among those with minor injuries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2008
Keywords
emergency department, patient's experience, Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire, quality of care, traffic injury
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-21770 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01873.x (DOI)000253121300004 ()17419790 (PubMedID)
Note

Published Online: 5 Apr 2007

Available from: 2009-04-20 Created: 2009-04-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ångström-Brännström, C., Norberg, A. & Jansson, L. (2008). Narratives of children with chronic illness about being comforted. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 23(4), 310-316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narratives of children with chronic illness about being comforted
2008 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 310-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to examine how children with chronic illnesses narrate their experience of being comforted in hospital. During interviews, seven children, 4-10 years old described their experiences and made drawings. Thematic content analysis revealed following themes: being physically close to one's family , feeling safe and secure, staff being there for the children, and children being there for the parents and siblings. Mother was identified as the most important comforter. The findings suggest that trusting in the staff's knowledge and professional skills is a prerequisite for the children to feel "at home", and safe in hospital. Being close to one's family is even more important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
W.B. Saunders, 2008
Keywords
Children, Chronic illness, Comfort, Drawing, Hospital, Narrative
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37665 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2007.04.006 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-11-11 Created: 2010-11-11 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ahl, C., Nyström, M. & Jansson, L. (2006). Making up one's mind: patients' experiences of calling an ambulance. Accident and Emergency Nursing, 14(1), 11-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making up one's mind: patients' experiences of calling an ambulance
2006 (English)In: Accident and Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0965-2302, E-ISSN 1532-9267, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The issue of the inappropriate use of ambulance transport and care has mainly been studied from the professionals' and caregivers' perspective, with few studies focusing on the patient and his/her experiences. To further understand whether patients use ambulance care in an inappropriate manner and, if so, why, it is important to obtain an overall picture of the patients' existential situation at the time they call an ambulance. The aim of this study was to analyse and describe patients' experiences related to the decision to call an ambulance and the wait for it to arrive. The design was explorative, and twenty informants aged between 34 and 82 years were interviewed. Qualitative content analyses were performed. The findings showed that calling for an ambulance is a major decision that is preceded by hesitation and attempts to handle the situation by oneself. Our conclusion is that the definition of inappropriate use of valuable health care resources should not be based solely on the professionals' point of view but also take account of the patients' reactions when they experience a threat to their life and health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2006
Keywords
Patient experience, Prehospital emergency care, Ambulance, Content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-19020 (URN)10.1016/j.aaen.2005.10.002 (DOI)16321535 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-03 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Graneheim, U. H. & Jansson, L. (2006). The meaning of living with dementia and disturbing behaviour as narrated by three persons admitted to a residential home.. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 15(11), 1397-403
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The meaning of living with dementia and disturbing behaviour as narrated by three persons admitted to a residential home.
2006 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1397-403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of our study was to illuminate the meaning of living with dementia and disturbing behaviour, as narrated by three persons admitted to a residential home. BACKGROUND: Living with dementia and so-called disturbing behaviour in an institution involves interaction with care providers and fellow residents and poses a challenge to all who are involved. METHODS: We asked the head nurses at a residential home to select persons with dementia and disturbing behaviour who were willing to be interviewed and able to communicate verbally. We performed 10 informal conversational interviews with three persons. The interviews were transcribed into text and interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by Ricoeur's philosophy. RESULTS: The findings indicate that the meaning of living with dementia and disturbing behaviour, as narrated by three persons admitted to a residential home, is about being surrounded by disorder, being trapped by restriction and being set aside, as well as about being included. The findings are interpreted as a collapse of relations to self and others intertwined with occasional episodes of togetherness. This is reflected on in relation to the literature on homelessness and at-homeness and loss and maintenance of personal and social selves. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The view others have of the person with dementia and of disturbing behaviour determines the nursing care given. Taking the residents' personal history and actual context into account, disturbing behaviour may be seen as a way persons with dementia express their story and maintain their self.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-19056 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01476.x (DOI)17038100 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-03 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Graneheim, U. H., Isaksson, U., Ljung, I.-M. P. & Jansson, L. (2005). Balancing between contradictions: the meaning of interaction with people suffering from dementia and "behavioral disturbances".. The International Journal of Aging & Human Development, 60(2), 145-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balancing between contradictions: the meaning of interaction with people suffering from dementia and "behavioral disturbances".
2005 (English)In: The International Journal of Aging & Human Development, ISSN 0091-4150, E-ISSN 1541-3535, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 145-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interacting with people who suffer from dementia poses a challenge for care providers, and the presence of behavioral disturbances adds a further complication. Our article is based on the assumption that behavioral disturbances are meaningful expressions of experiences. Six narrative interviews were conducted with care providers with the aim of illuminating the meaning of interaction with people suffering from dementia and behavioral disturbances. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed into text, and interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutic methodology. The findings indicate that interacting with people with dementia and behavioral disturbances, as narrated by care providers, means balancing between contradictions concerning meeting the person in my versus her/his world, feeling powerless versus capable, and feeling rejected versus accepted. Interaction involves being at various positions along these continua at different points in time. Furthermore, it means facing ethical dilemmas concerning doing good for the individual or the collective. This is interpreted as a dialectic process and is reflected on in light of Hegel's reasoning about the struggle between the master and the slave.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-19107 (URN)10.2190/X2EN-XBDJ-EW6U-F363 (DOI)15801387 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-04 Created: 2009-03-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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