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Nordström, Annika
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Nordström, A. (2015). Glesbygdens förutsättningar att uppmärksamma barn i riskmiljö. Umeå: FoU Välfärd, Region Västerbotten
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glesbygdens förutsättningar att uppmärksamma barn i riskmiljö
2015 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: FoU Välfärd, Region Västerbotten, 2015. p. 46
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109876 (URN)
Available from: 2015-10-08 Created: 2015-10-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, L. M., Brännström, J., Chassler, D., Wilkey, C., Sullivan, L. & Nordström, A. (2013). Mental Health, Substance Use, and Criminal Justice Characteristics of Males With a History of Abuse in a Swedish National Sample. Journal of Dual Dignosis, 9(1), 47-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental Health, Substance Use, and Criminal Justice Characteristics of Males With a History of Abuse in a Swedish National Sample
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Dual Dignosis, ISSN 1550-4263 (Print), 1550-4271 (Online), Vol. 9, no 1, p. 47-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The primary goals of this study were to (a) provide the first estimate of prevalence of self-reported history of having been emotionally, physically, and/or sexually abused for men with a substance use disorder in Sweden and (b) identify, for men with a substance use disorder, mental health, substance use, and criminal justice characteristics associated with having a history of abuse. Methods: Assessment interviews for a substance use disorder were conducted in 50 out of 300 Swedish counties for the time period 2003 to 2008. Participants were a nationally representative sample of 9,571 Swedish men interviewed in county welfare offices. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) was used as an assessment tool in these counties. From the ASI, answers to questions asking about lifetime history of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse were analyzed to provide this initial measure on history of abuse. Bivariate statistical analysis and multivariate logistic regression methods were used to explore the relationships between substance use severity, level of mental health problems reported, criminal justice history, and history of being abused. Results: Overall, 47.9% of the men in this sample reported having experienced abuse; specifically, 26.9% of clients reported a history of physical abuse, 4.5% reported a history of sexual abuse, and 40.7% reported a history of emotional abuse. Results from logistic regression modeling identified that higher ASI mental health symptomology scores were associated with 13times higher likelihood of having experienced any abuse. Further, results from logistic regression models identified that scoring higher on the ASI mental health symptoms core was associated with an 8times higher likelihood of having experienced physical abuse,14times higher likelihood of having experienced sexual abuse, and 13times higher likelihood of having experienced emotional abuse. Conclusions: Both the high prevalence of reporting a history of abuse among men with substance use disorders and the strong association between reporting more mental health symptoms and history of abuse indicate a need for Swedish substance use disorder treatment programs to start using more comprehensive and clinically appropriate trauma assessment tools and to provide empirically supported trauma treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2013
Keywords
self-reported mental health symptoms, men, substance abuse disorders, history as victims of abuse, Sweden, national study
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67600 (URN)10.1080/15504263.2012.749830 (DOI)000315156600007 ()
Available from: 2013-06-03 Created: 2013-03-25 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Kaiser, N., Nordström, A., Jacobsson, L. & Renberg, E. S. (2011). Hazardous drinking and drinking patterns among the reindeer-herding Sami population in Sweden. Substance Use & Misuse, 46(10), 1318-1327
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hazardous drinking and drinking patterns among the reindeer-herding Sami population in Sweden
2011 (English)In: Substance Use & Misuse, ISSN 1082-6084, E-ISSN 1532-2491, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 1318-1327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to investigate hazardous drinking among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in 2007, which included the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. A total of 319 reindeer-herding Sami were compared with urban and rural reference populations of 1,393 persons. Data were analyzed with regard to population, gender, age group, education, anxiety, depression, and work-related stress. The Sami population did not report a higher prevalence of hazardous drinking compared with the reference groups; however, subgroups of Sami men with symptoms of depression were revealed as at risk, in contrast to Sami women who were not found to be at risk at all. Limitations of the study are discussed.

Keywords
alcohol, Sami, reindeer herder, Sweden
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-48522 (URN)10.3109/10826084.2011.577884 (DOI)21615220 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-10-20 Created: 2011-10-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M., Chotai, J., Nordström, A. & Bodlund, O. (2009). Comparison of two self-rating scales to detect depression: HADS and PHQ-9. British Journal of General Practice, 59(566), e283-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of two self-rating scales to detect depression: HADS and PHQ-9
2009 (English)In: British Journal of General Practice, ISSN 0960-1643, E-ISSN 1478-5242, Vol. 59, no 566, p. e283-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: More than half of patients with depression go undetected. Self-rating scales can be useful in screening for depression, and measuring severity and treatment outcome. AIM: This study compares the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) with regard to their psychometric properties, and investigates their agreement at different cut-off scores. METHOD: Swedish primary care patients and psychiatric outpatients (n = 737) who reported symptoms of depression completed the self-rating scales. Data were collected from 2006 to 2007. Analyses with respect to internal consistency, factor analysis, and agreement (Cohen's kappa) at recommended cut-offs were performed. RESULTS: Both scales had high internal consistency (alpha = 0.9) and stable factor structures. Using severity cut-offs, the PHQ-9 (> or =5) diagnosed about 30% more patients than the HADS depression subscale (HADS-D; > or =8). They recognised the same prevalence of mild and moderate depression, but differed in relation to severe depression. When comparing recommended screening cut-offs, HADS-D > or =11 (33.5% of participants) and PHQ-9 > or =10 (65.9%) agreement was low (kappa = 0.35). Using the lower recommended cut-off in the HADS-D (> or =8), agreement with PHQ-9 > or =10 was moderate (kappa = 0.52). The highest agreement (kappa = 0.56) was found comparing HADS-D > or =8 with PHQ-9 > or =12. This also equalised the prevalence of depression found by the scales. CONCLUSION: The HADS and PHQ-9 are both quick and reliable. The HADS has the advantage of evaluating both depression and anxiety, and the PHQ-9 of being strictly based upon the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The agreement between the scales at the best suitable cut-off is moderate, although the identified prevalence was similar. This indicates that the scales do not fully identify the same cases. This difference needs to be further explored.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-26132 (URN)10.3399/bjgp09X454070 (DOI)19761655 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-09-25 Created: 2009-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nordström, A. & Bodlund, O. (2008). Every third patient in primary care suffers from depression, anxiety or alcohol problems. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 62(3), 250-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Every third patient in primary care suffers from depression, anxiety or alcohol problems
2008 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 250-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims of the study were to explore the prevalence of patients with depression and anxiety in primary care, its co-occurrence with hazardous/harmful alcohol use, and its relation to gender, age and reason for visit. A questionnaire, including the self-rating Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale and the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test, was consecutively distributed to 1800 patients at 11 primary healthcare centres in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. The response rate was 77.3% (1392 patients), 38% men and 62% women. A total of 31.9% showed symptoms of depression and/or anxiety, with no gender differences. Harmful/hazardous alcohol use was found in 11.9% of the patients, 17.3% in men and 8.8% in women, although the region in Sweden has relatively low alcohol consumption among the population. Age was an important factor. Incidences of the conditions often occurred simultaneously. About half (51%) of those with harmful/hazardous alcohol use also showed symptoms of depression and/or anxiety. The most common causes for patients with symptoms of depression, anxiety or risk consumption of alcohol to seek care were the same as for the general population, namely complaints of pain or infection. Only 7.8% visited the primary care for psychiatric reasons, according to their own given reasons. In all, 38% of the patients showed signs of psychiatric symptoms and/or alcohol problems or a combination of these. The fact that every third patient showed symptoms of depression, anxiety and/or alcohol problems underlines the strategic position for early identification, intervention and treatment within primary healthcare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2008
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-36470 (URN)10.1080/08039480802141129 (DOI)18609025 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-09-30 Created: 2010-09-30 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Nordström, A., Kullgren, G. & Dahlgren, L. (2006). Schizophrenia and violent crime: The experience of parents. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 29(1), 57-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Schizophrenia and violent crime: The experience of parents
2006 (English)In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, ISSN 0160-2527, E-ISSN 1873-6386, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 57-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Individuals with schizophrenia have an increased risk of committing a violent crime, although their contribution to the overall criminality in society is small. In this qualitative study we have interviewed parents of adult sons, diagnosed with schizophrenia and who recently had been referred to forensic psychiatric treatment due to a violent crime, with an aim to explore the parents' experiences and emotional reactions. Four events, or status passages, emerged as crucial and common for all parents. These were the onset of the mental disorder, the diagnosis of schizophrenia, the violent behaviour/criminality and the recent referral to forensic psychiatric treatment. Every passage evoked strong emotional reactions such as guilt, fear, disappointment, anger and relief, which in return led to different actions taken. Unawareness of the character and severity of their sons' mental illness and the type of violent criminality they had committed were common and complicated contacts both between the parents and their sons, and also between family members and official authorities. The findings emphasize that psychiatric healthcare professionals must take the initiative and responsibility for information, education and support of family members.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13688 (URN)10.1016/j.ijlp.2004.07.002 (DOI)16278016 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-12-03 Created: 2008-12-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordström, A., Dahlgren, L. & Kullgren, G. (2006). Victim relations and factors triggering homicides committed by offenders with schizophrenia. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, 17(2), 192-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Victim relations and factors triggering homicides committed by offenders with schizophrenia
2006 (English)In: Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, ISSN 1478-9949, E-ISSN 1478-9957, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 192-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Western countries about 10 - 15% of those convicted of homicide suffer from a psychotic disorder. Victims are most often from the offender's immediate network, such as family members and friends. Delusions and/or hallucinations have an important role in violent behaviour, as does coexistent alcohol or drug abuse. In this study, all 48 homicides from 1992 - 2000 committed by offenders in Sweden diagnosed with schizophrenia were studied in order to identify possibly triggering factors related to victim relations. Nine of the 52 victims were strangers to the offender. In 54% of cases, the homicides were associated with obvious delusions and/or hallucinations. Among offenders with family victims 72% suffered from obvious delusions and/or hallucinations, as compared to 43% of offenders with non-family victims. Of the offenders, 79% were known to psychiatric services, but at the time of the crime only 33% had any ongoing contact. Despite 48% having been prescribed antipsychotic drugs, no more than two individuals were actually taking their medication. The offenders who had killed members of their biological families were seldom intoxicated and few had earlier convictions for violent crime. The mental health care services have a major responsibility to prevent homicides and violent crimes being committed by those with schizophrenia.

Keywords
Schizophrenia, homicide, victim relations, psychotic symptoms, intoxication, psychiatric treatment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-4040 (URN)10.1080/14789940600631522 (DOI)
Available from: 2004-08-25 Created: 2004-08-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordström, A. (2004). Violent offenders with schizophrenia: quantitative and qualitative studies focusing on the family of origin. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Klinisk vetenskap
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Violent offenders with schizophrenia: quantitative and qualitative studies focusing on the family of origin
2004 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The focus of the thesis is on violent offenders with schizophrenia and their relatives. The aims were to explore incidence of violent crimes, the extent to which family members were victims, to investigate individual background factors among violent offenders, and to identify psychotic symptoms and triggering factors associated with fatal violence. In addition, parents were interviewed to build an understanding of their experiences and emotional reactions.

One study examined all 369 male individuals who had committed a violent crime (assault, homicide or attempt to any of these crimes), who in a pre-trial forensic psychiatric evaluation (FPE) during 1992-2000 were diagnosed with schizophrenia, and who were referred to forensic psychiatric treatment. Although the majority of the 615 victims was unacquainted to the offenders, family members or male acquainted were most at risk of being severely injured or killed as victims.

Background factors were studied for the 207 Swedish offenders who for their first time were subjects of a FPE during the study period. There were indications that those offenders who targeted family members had an earlier onset and more severe course of their mental illness.

During the study period, 48 offenders committed homicides. Of the 52 victims, 83% were family members or acquainted to the offender. Those who killed a family member had more often delusions and/or hallucinations, were less often intoxicated, had to a lesser extent committed a previous violent crime and they were younger at the time of the homicide.

Parents, who were interviewed, were very emotionally involved in their adult sons, although they were not living together. Ignorance regarding the diagnosis of their son and his criminality negatively influenced the contacts, both between parent and son and between parent and professionals in psychiatry. However, the referral to forensic psychiatric treatment gave the parents hope for a positive development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Klinisk vetenskap, 2004. p. 58
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 904
Keywords
Psychiatry, schizophrenia, offenders, homicide, criminality, victim relations, family members, forensic psychiatry, Psykiatri
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-298 (URN)91-7305-692-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2004-09-17, Sal B, Tandläkarhögskolan, NUS, Umeå, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2004-08-25 Created: 2004-08-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordström, A. & Kullgren, G. (2003). Do violent offenders with schizophrenia who attack family members differ from those with other victims?. International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, 2(2), 195-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do violent offenders with schizophrenia who attack family members differ from those with other victims?
2003 (English)In: International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, ISSN 1499-9013, E-ISSN 1932-9903, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 195-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Do violent offenders with schizophrenia who attack family members differ from those with other victims?Data on individual background factors were collected on all male offenders of violent crimes who for theirfirst time were subject to forensic psychiatric evaluation in Sweden between 1992 and 2000 and were diagnosedwith schizophrenia. In addition to descriptive data for the whole sample, analyses were made in order toidentify possible characteristic factors for offenders who targeted family members. In comparison to offenderswith other victims, the findings indicate an earlier onset of mental illness, in terms of that they were morelikely to have interrupted their schooling at an earlier stage, were more likely to have had psychiatriccontacts in childhood, to be younger when first compulsorily admitted to psychiatric inpatient treatment,and they were also younger when they committed the index crime. The findings suggest the need to addressthe possibility of violent behavior within the family when managing patients with major mental disorders.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-4039 (URN)
Available from: 2004-08-25 Created: 2004-08-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordström, A. & Kullgren, G. (2003). Victim relations and victim gender in violent crimes committed by offenders with schizophrenia. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 38(6), 326-330
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Victim relations and victim gender in violent crimes committed by offenders with schizophrenia
2003 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 326-330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Family members and friends appear to be most at risk of becoming victims of violence committed by offenders with major mental disorders. The aim of the present study is to examine, in a national sample, victim relation in violent crimes committed by male offenders with schizophrenia, with special reference to victim gender and the severity of violence. METHOD: We identified all violent offenders who were diagnosed with schizophrenia in forensic psychiatric evaluations during the years 1992-2000 and examined their court convictions. In total 588 victims were included, 327 men and 261 women, and distributed into three groups based on their relation to the offender: Family of origin (n = 77), Network (n = 183) and Unacquainted (n = 328). RESULTS: The majority of the victims were unacquainted with the offender, but the violence was less severe in this group. Among family members, e. g. parents, siblings and grandparents, there were more female than male victims (60 % vs 40 %), and victims in families, as well as males within the offender's network, were those most likely to be seriously or fatally injured. Female family victims, in particular mothers, were those most likely to die as victims of severe violence. CONCLUSIONS: The study highlights the risk for family members and the immediate network of becoming a target of violence. Mental health services together with community-based services have an important task in identifying risk situations and taking preventive measures.

Keywords
schizophrenia, violence, victim, family, gender, Sweden
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-4038 (URN)10.1007/s00127-003-0640-5 (DOI)12799783 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2004-08-25 Created: 2004-08-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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