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Arvidsson, Viktor
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Arvidsson, V. (2016). Strategy Blindness as Disciplined IT-use Practice: Looking Past the 'Unintended and Unexpected' through the Practice Lens. In: 2016 49th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Science (HICSS): . Paper presented at Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), January 5-8, 2016, Grand Hyatt Kauai (pp. 4644-4653). IEEE Computer Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategy Blindness as Disciplined IT-use Practice: Looking Past the 'Unintended and Unexpected' through the Practice Lens
2016 (English)In: 2016 49th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Science (HICSS), IEEE Computer Society, 2016, p. 4644-4653Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Strategy blindness is commonly understood as an unexpected outcome of IS strategy implementation that results as users make sense of new IT resources in unintended ways. What could be learned by instead treating strategy blindness expected? To this end, this paper unpacks some common assumptions of strategic failure and presents an alternative assumption ground. To explain how masculinites form sources of strategy failure, I reanalyze IT use at a Swedish paper-mill as negotiated among rough and respectable men: blue-collar workers and white-collar managers are shown to maintain distinct hierarchies yet enact the same fixed IT use reality; in each case, intimate relations to the paper machine dictated their ways. Power plays of optimization and mastery illustrate each identity. I then critique current ideas in strategic management and received notions of how IT matters in strategy practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society, 2016
Series
Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, ISSN 1060-3425
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109758 (URN)10.1109/HICSS.2016.576 (DOI)000377358204085 ()978-0-7695-5670-3 (ISBN)
Conference
Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), January 5-8, 2016, Grand Hyatt Kauai
Available from: 2015-10-05 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, V. & Foka, A. (2015). Digital gender: perspective, phenomena, practice. First Monday, 20(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital gender: perspective, phenomena, practice
2015 (English)In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Past research on gender online has made important land gains but under-theorizes the Internet as a passive, fixed, and somewhat insubstantial space or context. By contrast, this special issue draws on new material thinking to put into questions the very notion of “cyberspace” as a distinct realm. In this vein, the contents of this issue critically examine how the Internet and related digital technologies actively “work” to maintain or transform systems of oppression, as displayed, for example, in the digital doing(s) of gender. They also show how digital technologies and related concepts can be used to challenge current understandings of race, class, and gender and to produce and provoke new forms of knowledge. While the contents of this issue are drawn from different fields and display great diversity, the individual contributions of each author helps to chart out three potent venues for future Internet research: namely digital gender as perspective, phenomena, and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2015
Keywords
Gender, Social Media, Internet, History, Narratives, Representations, Digital Humanities, Gender Online, Online Research
National Category
Media and Communications Sociology Other Humanities History Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History; Computer and Information Science; design; genusvetenskap; History; medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101700 (URN)10.5210/fm.v20i4.5930 (DOI)2-s2.0-84928679085 (Scopus ID)
External cooperation:
Projects
Multiple Screens as MaterialChallenging Gender
Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, V. (2015). Digital transformation: the material roles of IT resources and their political uses. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital transformation: the material roles of IT resources and their political uses
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Digital transformation : den materiella betydelsen av IT-resurser och dess politiska användning i strategiska informationssystem
Abstract [en]

As IT became ubiquitous, we recognized that IT was everywhere but in our theories. Despite significant efforts, Information System (IS) research is still in desperate search for the IT artifact. Recent reviews show that IS research first and foremost considers IT resources as a socio-technical and managerial concern. Analyses of inertia are restricted to cognitive limitations or technical challenges of IT development and use as separate activities. Hence, IS research assumes that more development resources, extended training, and better management could turn most failures into success. In this thesis, I posit that IS strategy research often treats normal failure as unexpected to maintain the rational idea that managers are in control and that IT does not matter in and of itself. I argue that planned and convergent views of change work well under stable and unitary conditions but in this way fail to account for the complexity of current IS strategy practice. To substantiate this claim, I demonstrate how IS research routinely neglects the material IT use story in the context of digital transformation (DT) studies and social informatics. Political conflict is a constant theme in IS strategy implementation research, yet few studies provided explanation for the apprehension that managers and workers display during the introduction of new IT resources; even as most managers remain men I found also no study that theorized gender politics as related to IS strategy outcomes. I argue in particular that the IS fields routine adherence to borrowed assumptions about the pace, linearity, and sequence of radical change have limited IS scholars to marginally improve on received DT narratives in which IT plays little or no part as IT appears as an agent mostly before and after DT. Though much is said about how IT triggers and enables organizational change, the actual processes and mechanisms that underlies IS strategy change enactments are thus poorly understood. To examine how the material roles of IT resources and their political use can be captured and explained, I summarize and synthesize insights grounded in empirics from four appended research papers. In this way, I chart avenues for material theorizing of micro-affordances and institutions, and develop an IS strategy-as-practice lens that attends IT use as a material practice. After developing this lens, I discuss how material practice perspectives afford deep understanding of the materialities through which actors create, sustain, and transform organizational practice with digital material, and highlight some opportunities to observe the social consequences of IT use in the context of critical studies on men and masculinities and digital gender.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2015. p. 112
Series
Research reports in informatics, ISSN 1401-4572 ; 15.03
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-109761 (URN)978-91-7601-365-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-10-30, MIT-huset, MA1, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Foka, A. & Arvidsson, V. (2014). Digital gender: a manifesto: report on the research workshop: digital gender: theory, methodology, and practice. Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital gender: a manifesto: report on the research workshop: digital gender: theory, methodology, and practice
2014 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

While early day Internet research often hailed “Cyberspace” as an arena where individuals would be liberated from the social shackles of their biological gender, a growing body of research makes evident the exaggerations present within these romanticized claims. Though the online gender divide is rapidly eroding, the Internet remains rooted in society at large. While digital technologies can challenge normative views, they therefore often maintain status quo. Consequently, there is a need to revisit old claims and challenge traditional notions of ”Digital Gender”. In this vein, this manifesto reports and synthesizes findings and discussions from an international workshop titled ”Digital Gender: Theory, Methodology and Practice”, held at Umeå University, Sweden, in early 2014. Against this backdrop, we chart out a new agenda for research on how the digital intermingle with the social in the production of gender. In particular, we argue that scholars must move past the idea of Internet as a separate – virtual – realm and direct attention to the increasingly complex ways that digital technologies permeate social practices, altering the very fabric of society itself. On the one hand, we stress the need for research that focuses on how particular Internet technologies help maintain as well as challenge normative views of gender. On the other hand, we stress the need to uncover how particular material properties of digital technology affect the (un)making of such views. Overall, we also stress the need for scholars of gender to move beyond binary oppositions and to be appreciative of intersectionality in their analyses of digital gender construction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2014. p. 13
Keywords
Digital gender, internet and society, gender and technology, digital humanities
National Category
Gender Studies Information Systems, Social aspects Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Research subject
genusvetenskap
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88789 (URN)
Projects
Digital Gender
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, F13-1545:1
Available from: 2014-05-15 Created: 2014-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, V., Holmström, J. & Lyytinen, K. (2014). Information systems use as strategy practice: a multi-dimensional view of strategic information system implementation and use. Journal of strategic information systems, 23(1), 45-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information systems use as strategy practice: a multi-dimensional view of strategic information system implementation and use
2014 (English)In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 45-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Information systems (IS) are strategic in so far as they are used to realize strategic intent. Yet, while much has been said about aligning IS functionality with the strategic intent and how to organizationally implement strategically aligned systems, less is known of how to successfully implement strategic change associated with system use – a truly critical challenge within strategic IS implementation. Drawing on a strategy-as-practice perspective we address this gap by developing a multi-dimensional view of IS strategy, conceptualizing three key challenges in the IS strategy process, to explain how and why a paper mill, despite successfully implementing a strategic production management system, failed to produce intended strategic change. We call this outcome strategy blindness: organizational incapability to realize the strategic intent of implemented, available system capabilities. Using a longitudinal case study we investigate how cognitive rigidity of key actors and fixed, interrelated practices shaped the implementation of the new production system. We also identify core components and dynamics that constitute a richer multi-dimensional view of the IS strategy implementation (alignment) process. In particular, we identify three salient factors that contribute to strategy blindness – mistranslation of intent, flexibility of the IT artifact and cognitive entrenchment – and discuss how they affect strategic implementation processes. We conclude by discussing implications of our findings for IS strategy theory and practice, especially the contribution of strategy-as-practice to this stream of research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
strategic IS implementation, multi-dimensional view of IS strategy, strategic change, information systems use, cognitive entrenchment
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86319 (URN)10.1016/j.jsis.2014.01.004 (DOI)000335546600004 ()
Note

Special Issue: SI

Available from: 2014-02-23 Created: 2014-02-23 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, V. & Holmström, J. (2013). Social Media Strategy: Understanding Social Media, IT Strategy, and Organizational Responsiveness in Times of Crisis. Cutter IT Journal, 26(12), 18-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Media Strategy: Understanding Social Media, IT Strategy, and Organizational Responsiveness in Times of Crisis
2013 (English)In: Cutter IT Journal, ISSN 1522-7383, Vol. 26, no 12, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to effectively and efficiently interact with the business environment is key to organizational success. To this end, organizations increasingly use IT to enable new, improved flows of information both within and across organizational boundaries. Social media (SM) technologies hold great potential for enabling new forms of communication with distant actors. For this potential to be fully realized, however, investments in technology should be made alongside changes in organizational practice and design. While all IT strategies should complement high-level organizational goals and identify the organizational changes necessary to realize them,1 this is particularly the case with SM strategy, as it necessarily challenges traditional forms of organizing and blurs organizational boundaries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cutter Consortium, 2013
Keywords
social media, strategy, crisis, organizational response
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-84627 (URN)
Available from: 2014-01-11 Created: 2014-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, V. (2012). The revolution that wasn’t: Investigating barriers to platform-based e-service delivery partnerships. In: Proceedings of the 45th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Wailea, January 4-7, 2012. Paper presented at HICSS 45, Wailea, January 4-7, 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The revolution that wasn’t: Investigating barriers to platform-based e-service delivery partnerships
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the 45th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Wailea, January 4-7, 2012, 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In response to the increasing political and popular demand on e-government to deliver, governments have begun to seek out new, alternative forms of operation. One such development in the domain of e-government is the emergence of private-public partnerships (PPP). However, research on PPPs in the service layer of e- government is virtually silent. In this paper we argue that one possible approach to help close this gap is by investigating key partnership issues from a platform perspective. Building on a case study, and using this novel perspective, we identify three key barriers for developing platform-based partnerships for e-service delivery in local government: the bureaucratic barrier, the interface barrier and the business barrier. Based on experiences from this study, we also conclude that the platform approach have proven useful as a means to close the highlighted gap in research. 

National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51196 (URN)
Conference
HICSS 45, Wailea, January 4-7, 2012
Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, V. (2012). Towards efficient and effective e-service delivery: Addressing the challenges of e-service evaluation in local government. In: Y. Dwivedi & M. Akhter & Norm Archer (Ed.), Transformational Government through eGov: Socio-economic, Cultural, and Technological issues (pp. 155-188). UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards efficient and effective e-service delivery: Addressing the challenges of e-service evaluation in local government
2012 (English)In: Transformational Government through eGov: Socio-economic, Cultural, and Technological issues / [ed] Y. Dwivedi & M. Akhter & Norm Archer, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012, p. 155-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study present and provide insight into the design of eVAL, an ex ante e-service evaluation model designed for use in local governments with the ambition of helping local governments overcome the challenges of e-service delivery.

Methodology: The evaluation model has been developed through participatory design research, which takes place within an overarching case study of a Swedish municipality.

Findings: This paper identifies three key challenges for e-service delivery and evaluation in the local government: managing intricacy, handling public value and forecasting take-up.

Research limitations/implications: This study stresses the need for researchers to give attention to the dilemma local governments are faced with, and provides a possible middle-way out of the debate on the appropriateness of traditional investment techniques in the public sector.

Practical implications: The importance of data and organizational capabilities for evaluation and successful implementation of e-services is stressed.

Originality/value: This study provides an insight into the challenges that local governments have to face as the attempt to implement e-services in an efficient and effective fashion, while at the same time presenting a novel evaluation model capable of addressing some of these challenges. Whereas evaluation models do exist, none of the models reviewed during design were found applicable in the context of local government.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012
Keywords
e-service, evaluation, intricacy, e-government, public value
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51206 (URN)9781780523347 (ISBN)
Projects
Modeller för strategisk verksamhetsutveckling av offentlig verksamhet
Note

This books publish date is April 2012.

Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, V. (2011). Evaluating E-Service Candidates: Participatory design of an e-service valuation model. Paper presented at 8th Scandinavian workshop on e-Government.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating E-Service Candidates: Participatory design of an e-service valuation model
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51208 (URN)
Conference
8th Scandinavian workshop on e-Government
Projects
Modeller för strategisk verksamhetsutveckling av offentlig verksamhet
Available from: 2012-01-25 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Arvidsson, V. (2011). Towards efficient and effective E-Service Delivery: Addressing the matter of intricacy in service evaluation. Paper presented at 8th Scandinavian workshop on e-Government.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards efficient and effective E-Service Delivery: Addressing the matter of intricacy in service evaluation
2011 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The great promises of e-government have proven to be harder than expected to realise. Effective and efficient e-service delivery is dependent on making sound choices as to which e- services to implement; consequently, accountability in the use of ICT-resources have become of increasing importance. This generates a need to identify what constitutes a suitable e-service, and to devise models capable of evaluating available options. As public services reach beyond the business rationale of the private sector, such considerations must deal with the complexity of public value. Additionally, due to the heterogeneous nature of local government it is not feasible to evaluate every candidate in depth. For e-service delivery to reach beyond major services governments must lower their demands for accuracy and implement more cost- efficient ways of estimating public value. This paper investigates how this can be achieved while maintaining satisfactory results, and builds an understanding of the challenges that local governments face in doing so. 

Keywords
e-government, e-service delivery, intricacy, guidelines, appraisal, evaluation.
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51207 (URN)
Conference
8th Scandinavian workshop on e-Government
Projects
Modeller för strategisk verksamhetsutveckling av offentlig verksamhet
Note

Manuskriptet publicerat 2012 med ändrad undertitel i boken:  Transformational Government Through EGov Practice: Socioeconomic, Cultural and technological issues.; redigerad av Mahmud Akhter Shareef,Norm Archer,Yogesh K. Dwivedi; ISBN 9781780523354

Available from: 2012-01-25 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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