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Areljung, S. (2020). Att rita i NO-undervisningen. Stockholm: Skolverket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att rita i NO-undervisningen
2020 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Skolverkets presentation av moduldelen: 

Elever får ofta rita som en del i NO-undervisningen. Den här delen ställer frågan varför eleverna ska rita och på vilket sätt ritande kan användas som utgångspunkt för samtal och för att introducera eleverna till naturvetenskaplig praktiker som observationer och experiment. Målet är att väcka tankar om närhur och varför det kan vara värdefullt för eleverna att rita och hur det kan kombineras med skrivande.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm: Skolverket, 2020. p. 9
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169302 (URN)
Available from: 2020-03-31 Created: 2020-03-31 Last updated: 2020-03-31Bibliographically approved
Areljung, S. (2020). Capturing the world with verbs: preschool science education beyond nouns and objects. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 21(1), 70-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capturing the world with verbs: preschool science education beyond nouns and objects
2020 (English)In: Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, ISSN 1463-9491, E-ISSN 1463-9491, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article seeks to contribute new perspectives to the ontology and epistemology of preschool science education by exploring the idea of using everyday verbs, rather than nouns, to discern possibilities for science learning in preschool. Herein, the author merges empirical examples from preschools with findings from research on children's noun and verb learning and posthumanist perspectives on matter and concepts. What comes out of the exploration is a radical way of viewing and knowing the world. The verbs trigger a shift from an object-oriented view of the world to seeing action and non-tangible processes and phenomena in one's surroundings. Further, the verbs highlight the potential science learning that emerges in action and in child–matter relations, opening up to preschool science pedagogies that go beyond subjective/objective and concrete/abstract binaries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
Keywords
Epistemology, language, posthumanism, preschool, science education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152681 (URN)10.1177/1463949118805438 (DOI)000523865600007 ()
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2020-04-27Bibliographically approved
Areljung, S. (2020). Naturvetenskapsverb. Skolverket
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Naturvetenskapsverb
2020 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Skolverkets presentation av moduldelen:

Substantiv som vatten och is är ofta utgångspunkt för undervisning i naturvetenskap. Den här delen handlar om hur man kan få syn på naturvetenskapliga processer och fenomen i vardagen genom att istället ha verb som smälta och stelna som startskott för praktiska undersökningar som både utvecklar elevernas kunskaper i naturvetenskap och deras språk. 

Place, publisher, year, pages
Skolverket, 2020. p. 8
Keywords
förskoleklass, lågstadiet, undersökande, naturvetenskapligt språk
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-169301 (URN)
Available from: 2020-03-31 Created: 2020-03-31 Last updated: 2020-03-31Bibliographically approved
Areljung, S. & Kelly-Ware, J. P. (2020). The Risks of Reification: Using 'Professional Risk' to Understand Why and How Teachers Choose to Document (Some of) Children’s Ideas and Actions. In: Maarit Alasuutari, Helga Kelle, Helen Knauf (Ed.), Documentation in Institutional Contexts of Early Childhood: Normalisation, Participation and Professionalism (pp. 187-204). Wiesbaden: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Risks of Reification: Using 'Professional Risk' to Understand Why and How Teachers Choose to Document (Some of) Children’s Ideas and Actions
2020 (English)In: Documentation in Institutional Contexts of Early Childhood: Normalisation, Participation and Professionalism / [ed] Maarit Alasuutari, Helga Kelle, Helen Knauf, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2020, p. 187-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter sets out to make a practical contribution to the discussion on power relations involved in documentation in early childhood education [ECE]. We suggest ‘professional risk’ as a key concept to understand why and how teachers materialise some of children’s actions and comments in various forms of documentation. The chapter builds on stories of two ECE settings—one Swedish preschool where a science project was documented as a public wall display, and one New Zealand kindergarten where a project about fairness and inclusion was documented in a variety of Learnings Stories in individual children’s portfolios. Our results indicate that the ideals of the ECE setting are likely to govern what teachers choose to document as examples of learning and behaviour. The two cases also highlight that topic matters. It may be riskier for teachers to document children’s ideas about socially sensitive topics like inclusion, compared to documenting children’s ideas about science. Furthermore, the cases indicate that form matters. For example, the narrative credit-based assessment form of a Learning Story seems to steer teachers to await a positive situation, where children’s actions fit with the notion of what is acceptable behaviour in the ECE setting, before they document children’s learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiesbaden: Springer, 2020
Keywords
Community of practice, early childhood education, learning stories, pedagogical documentation, power, Reggio Emilia, reification, voice
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-170213 (URN)10.1007/978-3-658-28193-9_10 (DOI)978-3-658-28192-2 (ISBN)978-3-658-28193-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-04-29 Created: 2020-04-29 Last updated: 2020-05-05Bibliographically approved
Areljung, S. (2019). How does matter matter in preschool science?. In: Catherine Milne, Kathryn Scantlebury (Ed.), Material practice and materiality: too long ignored in science education (pp. 101-114). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does matter matter in preschool science?
2019 (English)In: Material practice and materiality: too long ignored in science education / [ed] Catherine Milne, Kathryn Scantlebury, Springer, 2019, p. 101-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter examines science practices in Swedish preschools (school form for children aged 1–5 years) in relation to three central themes in Karen Barad's agential realism: "non-human bodies as active agents", "intra-action" and "phenomena before things". Drawing on empirical material from my work with four preschools and one pedagogical development centre, I discuss how evening out hierarchies between human and non-human bodies could affect our thoughts about, and organisation of, science education in preschool. One example in the chapter shows how Barad's idea of regarding phenomena as the smallest onto-epistemological entity relates to teachers' using everyday verbs to identify physical phenomena and chemical processes in children's interplay with the surrounding world. I argue that shifting perspectives from viewing science learning as learning about the material world to learning together with the material world has the potential to empower teachers since it means that science knowledge is not detached from them but is embodied and personal. Evening out hierarchies between the human and non-human does not necessarily change views on science education in one sense – the physical world still in the centre – but in another sense, it does, as teachers and children are entangled with the knowledges produced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Series
Cultural Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1879-7229 ; 18
Keywords
science teaching, material, physical environment, time, early childhood education
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155566 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-01974-7 (DOI)9783030019730 (ISBN)9783030019747 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-11-12Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, B., Areljung, S. & Ottander, C. (2019). Opportunities for Education for Sustainability through multidimensional preschool science. NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, 15(4), 358-369
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities for Education for Sustainability through multidimensional preschool science
2019 (English)In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 358-369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we exemplify and discuss how preschool science education may contribute to Education for Sustainability (EfS). We draw on data from science activities in fourteen Swedish preschools, in which we have previously identified examples of ‘multidimensional science teaching’, hence, teaching that intertwines children’s science learning with multiple dimensions of children’s lives, such as emotions, fantasy, play and aesthetic modes of expressions. By re-analysing these activities through an EfS lense, we show several examples of how multidimensional science teaching provide opportunities for children to develop agency and empowerment as well as connectedness with the environment, and some examples of creative problem solving. Yet, we advocate that teachers’ active participation is crucial for realising multidimensional science teaching in a way that contributes to EfS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UiO: University Library, 2019
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166733 (URN)10.5617/nordina.6237 (DOI)2-s2.0-85076924090 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2020-01-07Bibliographically approved
Areljung, S. (2019). Science-Arts as Verbs: New Figurations in Early Childhood. In: Pamela Burnard & Laura Colucci-Gray (Ed.), Why Science and Art Creativities Matter: (Re-)Configuring STEAM for Future-making Education (pp. 148-165). Brill | Sense
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Science-Arts as Verbs: New Figurations in Early Childhood
2019 (English)In: Why Science and Art Creativities Matter: (Re-)Configuring STEAM for Future-making Education / [ed] Pamela Burnard & Laura Colucci-Gray, Brill | Sense , 2019, p. 148-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter examines how STEAM education may transform education in the STEM subjects towards education for a sustainable future. Particularly, it examines the potential of combining science and arts in preschool practice (children aged 1–5 years) for the sake of fostering sustainable knowing and being in the world. Here, it pursues the idea that everyday science verbs (e.g., rolling, bouncing and sticking) may be referents for children–matter relations in which science learning and creativity emerge. The chapter includes two stories from a collaboration with preschool teachers who have implemented verb-based science-arts education in practice. In one story, the verbs “sprout and grow” were combined with painting and drama, and in the other story, the verb “shade” (to cast a shadow) was combined with music, dancing and painting. Grounded in Edvin Østergaard’s plea to make more room for aesthetic experience in science education, in Barbara McClintock’s scientific creativity and “feeling for the organism”, and in Karen Barad’s agential realism, the chapter portrays examples of science-arts education that allow children to be intensely involved in the world. It concludes that the arts may help children not only to communicate and explore science phenomena, but also to sympathise with nature’s goings on from within; from their own multifaceted experiences of what it is like to cast a shadow, sprout and grow.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brill | Sense, 2019
Series
Critical Issues in the Future of Learning and Teaching, ISSN 2542-8721 ; 18
Keywords
agential realism, arts, Barad, early childhood education, entanglement, feminist science studies, Østergaard, McClintock, science education, sustainability
National Category
Pedagogical Work Didactics
Research subject
didactics of natural science; educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166755 (URN)10.1163/9789004421585_010 (DOI)978-90-04-42163-9 (ISBN)978-90-04-39611-1 (ISBN)978-90-04-42158-5 (ISBN)
Projects
NaturvetenSkapande
Available from: 2019-12-27 Created: 2019-12-27 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, B., Areljung, S., Due, K., Ottander, C. & Skoog, M. (2019). Using third generation activity theory to understand teachers’ boundary work across early childhood school forms: an example focusing science teaching (dis)continuities. In: : . Paper presented at The 8th Nordic ISCAR, Nordic Conference on Cultural and Activity Research : Cultural-Historical Activity Theory in Research and Practice: A Nordic Approach, Trondheim, Norway, June 18-20, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using third generation activity theory to understand teachers’ boundary work across early childhood school forms: an example focusing science teaching (dis)continuities
Show others...
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
educational work; didactics of natural science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166756 (URN)
Conference
The 8th Nordic ISCAR, Nordic Conference on Cultural and Activity Research : Cultural-Historical Activity Theory in Research and Practice: A Nordic Approach, Trondheim, Norway, June 18-20, 2019
Projects
Broar för naturvetenskap
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-03868
Available from: 2019-12-27 Created: 2019-12-27 Last updated: 2020-01-02Bibliographically approved
Areljung, S. (2019). Why do teachers adopt or resist a pedagogical idea for teaching science in preschool?. International Journal of Early Years Education, 27(3), 238-253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why do teachers adopt or resist a pedagogical idea for teaching science in preschool?
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Early Years Education, ISSN 0966-9760, E-ISSN 1469-8463, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 238-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Numerous initiatives are carried out across the world to support science teaching in early childhood education. However, professional development research shows that in order for teaching interventions to bring about successful changes in practice, it is key that teacher’s beliefs, confidence and knowledge change. As a complement to studies showing how teachers change, this article examines why teachers adopt a pedagogical idea for teaching science in preschool. Drawing on Clarke and Hollingsworth’s model for teacher professional growth, the article analyses interviews with teachers that have implemented and developed a pedagogical idea for teaching science in preschool. The results indicate that teachers adopt the pedagogical idea because it helps them to discern and build on science content in everyday practice, which they prefer to their previous way of teaching science through occasional experiments. Further the results show that teachers balance several external influences on what is good preschool pedagogy. The particular pedagogical idea eases that balancing act since it aligns with, and helps teachers to make meaning of, many of these influences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
science education, preschool, professional development, teacher-researcher collaboration, early childhood education
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135093 (URN)10.1080/09669760.2018.1481733 (DOI)000482477800003 ()
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2017-05-18 Created: 2017-05-18 Last updated: 2019-12-13Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, B., Areljung, S., Due, K., Ekström, K., Ottander, C. & Tellgren, B. (2018). Opportunities for and obstacles to science in preschools: views from a community perspective. International Journal of Science Education, 40(17), 2061-2077
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities for and obstacles to science in preschools: views from a community perspective
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 40, no 17, p. 2061-2077Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, Activity Theory (AT) is used to analyse general patterns for how cultural and historical factors interact with the shaping of science activities in preschools. Data was produced from field notes, video observations, video stimulated recall group discussions and individual interviews with preschool teachers at fourteen preschool units, where science activities were described as a common feature of the practice. Two factors were found to be particularly important for how and whether science learning opportunities were afforded the children: the structure of the preschool community and the type of educational culture within it. In communities characterised by weak mutual commitment and without joint understanding of the purpose of the activities, the science learning objects of the activity often became fragmented and thereby elusive. This was also true for strong communities, with a shared approach and a joint understanding of the purpose of the science activities, but with educational cultures where science learning was not actively supported. In contrast, a strong community combined with an educational culture that allowed teachers to lead and intentionally frame the science content, offered child-centred science activities with clear science learning objects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
early years/early childhood, qualitative research, teacher beliefs, activity theory
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Research subject
didactics of natural science; educational work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151747 (URN)10.1080/09500693.2018.1518615 (DOI)000451897000001 ()2-s2.0-85053318259 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2011-5657
Available from: 2018-09-12 Created: 2018-09-12 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7273-5442

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