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Stecksén-Blicks, Christina
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Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Hasslöf, P. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2020). Probiotic bacteria and dental caries. In: Zohoori F.V., Duckworth R.M. (Ed.), The Impact of Nutrition and Diet on Oral Health: (pp. 99-107). Basel: S. Karger (28)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotic bacteria and dental caries
2020 (English)In: The Impact of Nutrition and Diet on Oral Health / [ed] Zohoori F.V., Duckworth R.M., Basel: S. Karger, 2020, no 28, p. 99-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The World Health Organization has defined probiotics as “Live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host.” Traditionally, probiotic microorganisms (mainly Lactobacillus ssp. and Bifidobacterium ssp.) have been used to prevent or treat diseases in the gastrointestinal tract. In the past 20 years, there has been an increased interest in possible oral health effects of probiotics. In vitro studies have shown promising results with growth inhibition of mutans streptococci (MS) and Candida albicans. There are only a few clinical studies with caries development as the primary outcome while more studies have been focusing on control of caries risk factors or so-called surrogate outcomes. Several studies have evaluated the effects of probiotic bacteria on MS in saliva and/or plaque, and a number of probiotic strains show ability to reduce the number of MS. Probiotic bacteria have not been shown to permanently colonize the oral cavity; in early-in-life interventions or in subjects with a mature microbiota. To date investigated strains are transiently present in saliva during and shortly after an intervention. There are eight randomized controlled clinical trials with dental caries as outcome and probiotic strains, administration, duration of the intervention, and target group varied. In a majority of the studies (75%), the interventions resulted in caries reduction in the treatment groups. Although a majority of these studies suggest a caries-preventive effect of probiotic bacteria, more long-term clinical studies are needed in this field before probiotics could be recommended for preventing or treating dental caries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: S. Karger, 2020
Series
Monographs in Oral Science ; 28
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166374 (URN)10.1159/000455377 (DOI)978-3-318-06516-9 (ISBN)978-3-318-06517-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2019-12-18Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, A., Granström, E., Stecksén-Blicks, C., West, C. E. & Silfverdal, S.-A. (2018). The antisecretory factor in plasma and breast milk in breastfeeding mothers: a prospective cohort study in Sweden. Nutrients, 10(9), Article ID 1227.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The antisecretory factor in plasma and breast milk in breastfeeding mothers: a prospective cohort study in Sweden
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2018 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 9, article id 1227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inflammation and infection postpartum threaten the mother and her infant. Human milk provides a defense for the infant, but inflammatory complications like mastitis may lead to the cessation of breastfeeding. Antisecretory factor (AF) has a role in the regulation of secretory processes and inflammation. The objective of the study was to describe AF-levels in plasma and breast milk, and in relation to breast complications. Breastfeeding mothers (n = 95) were consecutively recruited at a Well Baby Clinic in Umeå, Sweden. At inclusion four weeks postpartum, samples of venous blood (10 mL) and breast milk (10 mL) were collected. Active AF was analyzed with ELISA using a monoclonal antibody mAb43, and was detected in all samples of plasma and breast milk with a positive correlation (Spearman coefficient = 0.40, p < 0.001; Pearson correlation = 0.34, p < 0.01). High AF-levels in plasma correlated with high AF-levels in breast milk. The results suggest a co-regulation between active AF in plasma and breastmilk, and/or a local regulation of AF in the breast. Further studies are needed to determine the pathways for the activation of AF-levels in breast milk and plasma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
antisecretory factor, breast milk, breastfeeding, candida, human milk, inflammation, lactoferrin
National Category
Pediatrics Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151722 (URN)10.3390/nu10091227 (DOI)000448659900100 ()30181494 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053077078 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Twetman, S. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2018). Urinary Fluoride Excretion after a Single Application of Fluoride Varnish in Preschool Children. Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, 16(4), 351-354
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urinary Fluoride Excretion after a Single Application of Fluoride Varnish in Preschool Children
2018 (English)In: Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry, ISSN 1602-1622, E-ISSN 1757-9996, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 351-354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To assess urinary fluoride excretion after topical application of a commercial fluoride varnish in preschool children.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve healthy children, 2.5-6.0 years of age, were enrolled in a placebo-controlled cross-over trial. After a 5-day run-in period, the morning urine was collected as baseline. One hour after breakfast, 0.1 ml of the active (Fluor Protector S; 7,700 ppm F) or the placebo varnish was applied with a microbrush on the buccal surfaces of the primary teeth. Thereafter, a 6-h urine sample was collected and the fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. The parents supervised toothbrushing with a small-fingernail amount of fluoride toothpaste (1000 ppm) twice daily during the entire experiment.

RESULTS: One boy failed to comply with the urinary samplings and was excluded. The mean fluoride concentration in the 6-h urine samples was slightly higher after the active varnish compared with the placebo varnish, but the difference was not statistically significant. Likewise, no statistically significant differences were obtained when the post-treatment concentrations were compared with baseline for the two varnishes. No side-effects or adverse events were reported.

CONCLUSION: A single topical treatment with the investigated varnish did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride excretion compared with placebo in preschool children with parallel use of fluoride toothpaste.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence Publishing Co., Ltd, 2018
Keywords
caries prevention, dental varnish, fluoride excretion, preschool children, urine
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151718 (URN)10.3290/j.ohpd.a40959 (DOI)000453317900008 ()30175333 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052825597 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-11 Created: 2018-09-11 Last updated: 2019-01-22Bibliographically approved
Stattin, E.-L., Henning, P., Klar, J., McDermott, E., Stecksen-Blicks, C., Sandström, P.-E., . . . Lerner, U. H. (2017). SNX10 gene mutation leading to osteopetrosis with dysfunctional osteoclasts. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 3012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SNX10 gene mutation leading to osteopetrosis with dysfunctional osteoclasts
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 3012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO) is a heterogeneous disorder, characterized by defective osteoclastic resorption of bone that results in increased bone density. We have studied nine individuals with an intermediate form of ARO, from the county of Västerbotten in Northern Sweden. All afflicted individuals had an onset in early infancy with optic atrophy, and in four patients anemia was present at diagnosis. Tonsillar herniation, foramen magnum stenosis, and severe osteomyelitis of the jaw were common clinical features. Whole exome sequencing, verified by Sanger sequencing, identified a splice site mutation c.212 + 1 G > T in the SNX10 gene encoding sorting nexin 10. Sequence analysis of the SNX10 transcript in patients revealed activation of a cryptic splice site in intron 4 resulting in a frame shift and a premature stop (p.S66Nfs * 15). Haplotype analysis showed that all cases originated from a single mutational event, and the age of the mutation was estimated to be approximately 950 years. Functional analysis of osteoclast progenitors isolated from peripheral blood of patients revealed that stimulation with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) resulted in a robust formation of large, multinucleated osteoclasts which generated sealing zones; however these osteoclasts exhibited defective ruffled borders and were unable to resorb bone in vitro.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136033 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-02533-2 (DOI)000402879800068 ()28592808 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Lockner, F., Twetman, S. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2017). Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, 27(6), 463-468
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 0960-7439, E-ISSN 1365-263X, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 463-468Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored.

AIM: To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste.

DESIGN: Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste. After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode.

RESULTS: There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P < 0.01). When fluoridated toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18).

CONCLUSIONS: Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste in connection with the varnish applications would decrease fluoride exposure.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130531 (URN)10.1111/ipd.12284 (DOI)000412526400006 ()28105705 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Norman, M., Twetman, S., Hultgren Talvilahti, A., Granström, E. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2017). Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste. Community Dental Health, 34(1), 27-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste
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2017 (English)In: Community Dental Health, ISSN 0265-539X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To assess the urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after drinking fluoridated milk with 0.185 mg F and 0.375 mg F and to study the impact of use of fluoride toothpaste.

Basic research design: Double-blind cross-over study.

Participants: Nine healthy children, 2.5-4.5 years of age.

Intervention: In a randomized order, participants drank 1.5 dl milk once daily for 7 days with no fluoride added (control), 0.185 mg fluoride added and 0.375 mg fluoride added. The experiment was performed twice with (Part I) and without (Part II) parental tooth brushing with 1,000 ppm fluoride toothpaste. The fluoride content in the piped drinking water was 0.5 mg F/L.

Main outcome measure: Urinary fluoride excretion.

Results: The 24-hour urinary fl uoride excretion/kg body weight varied from 0.014 mg F for the placebo intervention and non-fluoride toothpaste to 0.027 mg F for the 0.375 mg intervention with use of 1,000 ppm fluoride toothpaste. The difference compared with the placebo intervention was not statistically significant for any of the interventions when fluoride toothpaste was used (p⟩0.05) while it was statistically significantly different when non-fluoride toothpaste was used (p⟨0.05).

Conclusions: All sources of fluoride must be considered when designing community programs. With 0.5 mg F/L in the drinking water and daily use of fluoride toothpaste, most children had a fluoride intake optimal for dental health. In this setting, additional intake of fluoride milk was within safe limits up to 0.185 mg/day while conclusions about the safety of 0.375 mg/day were uncertain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Suffolk: FDI World Dental Press Ltd., 2017
Keywords
Sweden, caries prevention, children, fluoride excretion, fluoride toothpaste, milk fluoridation
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136032 (URN)10.1922/CDH_3943Norman05 (DOI)28561554 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, P., Karlsson Videhult, F., Silfverdal, S. A., West, C. E. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2017). Vitamin D Insufficiency among Women Post-Partum in Northern Sweden: A Public Health Concern. Food and Nutrition Sciences (8), 99-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vitamin D Insufficiency among Women Post-Partum in Northern Sweden: A Public Health Concern
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2017 (English)In: Food and Nutrition Sciences, ISSN 2157-944X, E-ISSN 2157-9458, no 8, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pregnancy and post-partum represent a period of susceptibility for vitamin D insufficiency. This study investigated S-25 [OH] D levels in women in northern Sweden 4 weeks post-partum and its association with selected background factors. Blood from 100 healthy women were analyzed for iron status and serum levels of S-25[OH] D using ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS). <50 nmol/L was categorized as insufficiency and <25 nmol/L as deficiency. Maternal BMI, dietary habits, fungal infections during pregnancy, and infant birth characteristics were collected using questionnaires and medical charts. 58% were vitamin D insufficient whereas 10% had deficiency. Insufficiency was most common during winter (OR = 2.77; 95% CI = 1.1-6.96) and women with deficiency reported lower milk consumption; 11.3 ± 22.8 intakes per months vs. 34.0 ± 28.9 for those above 25 nmol/L (p < 0.05). Vitamin D-insufficient women had lower serum ferritin levels (p < 0.01) and higher serum transferrin levels (p < 0.05). A history of vaginal fungal infection during pregnancy was associated with insufficiency (OR = 5.10; 95% CI = 1.01-25.73), however, the confidence interval of the estimate was wide, resulting in uncertainty. It is concluded that vitamin D insufficiency 4 weeks post-partum was common in women living at 63°49'N. The odds of being insufficient were increased during winter whereas milk consumption was negatively associated with deficiency. The low vitamin D-levels particularly during winter is a public health concern. From a public health perspective it has to be considered whether dietary advices alone should be modified or if supplementation with vitamin D during pregnancy and the post-partum period also is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2017
Keywords
Vitamin D Insufficiency, Fungal Infection, Postpartum, Public Health, Season
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130490 (URN)10.4236/fns.2017.81007 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Koch, G., Poulsen, S., Twetman, S. & Stecksén-Blicks, C. (2016). Caries Prevention (3ed.). In: Göran Koch, Sven Poulsen, Ivar Espelid, Dorte Haubek (Ed.), Pediatric dentistry: a clinical approach (pp. 114-129). Wiley-Blackwell
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caries Prevention
2016 (English)In: Pediatric dentistry: a clinical approach / [ed] Göran Koch, Sven Poulsen, Ivar Espelid, Dorte Haubek, Wiley-Blackwell, 2016, 3, p. 114-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Concepts of caries prevention

Erupting teeth are healthy, and the first carious lesion and its restoration marks the initiation of a series of treatments that during the tooth’s lifetime will end up in more and more complicated restorations. Today there is sufficient scientific knowledge about the etiology of caries and about factors that interfere in this process in order for us to develop effective preventive strategies. There is no excuse not to use this knowledge in attempts to control caries. Therefore, caries prevention should be given a high priority by the dental profession as well as by governmental authorities. In this context, the pediatric dentist has a very specific responsibility in meeting the challenge of keeping children and adolescents free from caries. For example, very young children with early signs of caries should be given special attention, as they tend to develop more caries compared to children without early signs of caries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016 Edition: 3
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130572 (URN)9781118913499 (ISBN)9781118913635 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-24 Created: 2017-01-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hansson, L., Öhlund, I., Lind, T., Stecksén-Blicks, C. & Rydberg, A. (2016). Dietary intake in infants with complex congenital heart disease: a case-control study on macro- and micronutrient intake, meal frequency and growth. Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), 29(1), 67-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary intake in infants with complex congenital heart disease: a case-control study on macro- and micronutrient intake, meal frequency and growth
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2016 (English)In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 67-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Children with severe congenital heart disease (CHD) need considerable nutritional support to reach normal growth. The actual intake of macro- and micronutrients in outpatient CHD infants over a 6-month period in infancy is not described in the literature. The present study aimed to prospectively investigate the distribution between macro- and micronutrient intake, meal frequency and growth in children with CHD.

METHODS: At 6, 9 and 12 months of age, a 3-day food diary and anthropometric data were collected in 11 infants with severe CHD and 22 healthy age- and feeding-matched controls. Macro- and micronutrient intake, meal frequency and growth were calculated.

RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, CHD infants had a statistically significantly higher intake of fat at 9 months of age (4.8 versus 3.6 g kg(-1) day(-1) ), a higher percentage energy (E%) from fat, (40.6% versus 34.5%) and a lower E% from carbohydrates (46.1% versus 39.6%) at 12 months of age, and a lower intake of iron (7.22 versus 9.28 mg day(-1) ) at 6 months of age. Meal frequency was significantly higher at 6 and 9 months of age (P < 0.01). Mean Z-score weight for height, weight for age and body mass index for age were significant lower (P < 0.01) at all time points.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite a higher intake of energy from fat and a higher meal frequency, the intake does not meet the needs for growth, and the results may indicate a low intake of micronutrients in CHD infants.

Keywords
congenital heart disease, energy intake, growth, meal frequency, micronutrient intake
National Category
Pediatrics Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101471 (URN)10.1111/jhn.12285 (DOI)000369167500008 ()25514839 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-31 Created: 2015-03-31 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Mejàre, I. A., Klingberg, G., Mowafi, F. K., Stecksén-Blicks, C., Twetman, S. H. A. & Tranaeus, S. H. (2015). A Systematic Map of Systematic Reviews in Pediatric Dentistry: What Do We Really Know?. PLoS ONE, 10(2), Article ID e0117537.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Systematic Map of Systematic Reviews in Pediatric Dentistry: What Do We Really Know?
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 2, article id e0117537Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To identify, appraise and summarize existing knowledge and knowledge gaps in practice-relevant questions in pediatric dentistry. Methods A systematic mapping of systematic reviews was undertaken for domains considered important in daily clinical practice. The literature search covered questions in the following domains: behavior management problems/dental anxiety; caries risk assessment and caries detection including radiographic technologies; prevention and non-operative treatment of caries in primary and young permanent teeth; operative treatment of caries in primary and young permanent teeth; prevention and treatment of periodontal disease; management of tooth developmental and mineralization disturbances; prevention and treatment of oral conditions in children with chronic diseases/developmental disturbances/obesity; diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental erosion and tooth wear; treatment of traumatic injuries in primary and young permanent teeth and cost-effectiveness of these interventions. Abstracts and full text reviews were assessed independently by two reviewers and any differences were solved by consensus. AMSTAR was used to assess the risk of bias of each included systematic review. Reviews judged as having a low or moderate risk of bias were used to formulate existing knowledge and knowledge gaps. Results Out of 81 systematic reviews meeting the inclusion criteria, 38 were judged to have a low or moderate risk of bias. Half of them concerned caries prevention. The quality of evidence was high for a caries-preventive effect of daily use of fluoride toothpaste and moderate for fissure sealing with resin-based materials. For the rest the quality of evidence for the effects of interventions was low or very low. Conclusion There is an urgent need for primary clinical research of good quality in most clinically-relevant domains in pediatric dentistry.

National Category
Dentistry Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102242 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0117537 (DOI)000350662100100 ()25706629 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-02 Created: 2015-04-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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