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Pettersson, H., Olsson, D. & Järvholm, B. (2020). Occupational exposure to noise and cold environment and the risk of death due to myocardial infarction and stroke. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational exposure to noise and cold environment and the risk of death due to myocardial infarction and stroke
2020 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The present study examined a possible association between occupational exposure to noise, working and living in cold conditions, and the risk of mortality in myocardial infarction and stroke.

METHODS: The present cohort study consists of 194,501 workers in the Swedish construction industry that participated in health examinations between 1971 and 1993. Noise exposure was defined on a job-exposure matrix based on a survey of the working conditions carried out during the mid 1970s. All workers were categorised into three main regions of Sweden, differing in temperature: Reference (Götaland), colder (Svealand), and coldest (Norrland). Relative risks (RR) were analysed by negative binomial regression adjusting for age, BMI, and smoking habits.

RESULTS: Moderate and high noise exposure was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (RR 1.10-1.13 with 95% CI over unit) and stroke mortality (RR 1.15 to 1.19 with 95% CI over unit). There was an increased risk for myocardial infarction (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.20), but not for stroke mortality (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.94-1.25) associated with living and working in the coldest region. There was an interaction on the risk of myocardial infarction mortality between different regions and noise exposure (p = 0.016), but not for stroke mortality (p = 0.88).

CONCLUSIONS: The study indicates an interaction between working at hazardous noise levels and living and working in cold conditions for increased mortality in myocardial infarction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Cerebrovascular disease, Ischemic heart disease, Mortality, Prospective cohort study, Work environment
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167217 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01513-5 (DOI)31915923 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 150070
Available from: 2020-01-13 Created: 2020-01-13 Last updated: 2020-01-14
Bråbäck, L., Olsson, D. & Forsberg, B. (2019). Grandmaternal smoking during pregnancy and asthma in grandchildren [Letter to the editor]. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 144(2), Article ID 624.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grandmaternal smoking during pregnancy and asthma in grandchildren
2019 (English)In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 144, no 2, article id 624Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162528 (URN)10.1016/j.jaci.2019.03.036 (DOI)000478789300039 ()31213286 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-23Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J. A., Olsson, D., Burdorf, A., Punnett, L., Järvholm, B. & Wahlström, J. (2019). Occupational biomechanical risk factors for radial nerve entrapment in a 13-year prospective study among male construction workers. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 76(5), 326-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational biomechanical risk factors for radial nerve entrapment in a 13-year prospective study among male construction workers
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2019 (English)In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 326-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The aim was to assess the association between occupational biomechanical exposure and the occurrence of radial nerve entrapment (RNE) in construction workers over a 13-year follow-up period.

METHODS: A cohort of 229 707 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance programme (1971-1993) was examined prospectively (2001-2013) for RNE. Height, weight, age, smoking status and job title (construction trade) were obtained on health examination. RNE case status was defined by surgical release of RNE, with data from the Swedish national registry for out-patient surgery records. A job exposure matrix was developed, and biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned according to job title. Highly correlated exposures were summed into biomechanical exposure scores. Negative binomial models were used to estimate the relative risks (RR) (incidence rate ratios) of RNE surgical release for the biomechanical factors and exposure sum scores. Predicted incidence was assessed for each exposure score modelled as a continuous variable to assess exposure-response relationships.

RESULTS: The total incidence rate of surgically treated RNE over the 13-year observation period was 3.53 cases per 100 000 person-years. There were 92 cases with occupational information. Increased risk for RNE was seen in workers with elevated hand-grip forces (RR=1.79, 95% CI 0.97 to 3.28) and exposure to hand-arm vibration (RR=1.47, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.00).

CONCLUSIONS: Occupational exposure to forceful handgrip work and vibration increased the risk for surgical treatment of RNE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
elbow flexion/extension, hand tools, hand-arm vibration, job exposure matrix, nerve entrapment, neuropathy, repetitive, static work, upper extremity load
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-157109 (URN)10.1136/oemed-2018-105311 (DOI)30850390 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J. A., Olsson, D., Punnett, L., Burdorf, A., Järvholm, B. & Wahlström, J. (2019). Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment in a prospective study of male construction workers. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 45(1), 63-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment in a prospective study of male construction workers
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 63-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the association between occupational biomechanical exposures and occurrence of surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment (UNE).

Methods: A cohort of 229 689 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance program (1971–1993) were examined prospectively over a 13-year case ascertainment period (2001–2013) for surgically treated UNE. Job title (construction trade), smoking status, height, weight and age were recorded on examination. Job titles were merged into occupational groups of workers performing similar work tasks and having similar training. Occupational biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned to each occupational group with a job exposure matrix (JEM) developed for the study. Negative binomial models were used to assess the relative risks for each biomechanical exposure and the sums of highly correlated biomechanical exposures. Surgical treatment of UNE was determined via a linkage with the Swedish Hospital Outpatient Surgery Register.

Results: There were 555 cases of surgically treated UNE within the cohort. Workers exposed to forceful hand-grip factors had a 1.4-fold higher relative risk (95% CI 1.18–1.63) of undergoing surgical treatment for UNE compared to unexposed workers. Occupational groups comprising workers exposed to forceful hand-grip work showed the highest risks for UNE and included concrete workers, floor layers, ground preparatory workers, rock blasters, and sheet-metal workers.

Conclusion: Forceful hand-grip work increases the risk for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordic Association of Occupational Safety and Health (NOROSH), 2019
Keywords
biomechanical, biomechanical risk factor, construction worker, cubital tunnel syndrome, elbow, elbow extension, grip force, hand tool, hand-arm vibration, HAV, JEM, job-exposure matrix, male construction worker, neuropathy, occupational biomechanical risk factor, prospective study, repetitive, risk factor, static work, ulnar nerve entrapment, upper-arm load
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152108 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3757 (DOI)000466176700007 ()30132781 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-01016
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Nagel, G., Stafoggia, M., Pedersen, M., Andersen, Z. J., Galassi, C., Munkenast, J., . . . Weinmayr, G. (2018). Air pollution and incidence of cancers of the stomach and the upper aerodigestive tract in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). International Journal of Cancer, 143(7), 1632-1643
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Air pollution and incidence of cancers of the stomach and the upper aerodigestive tract in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 7, p. 1632-1643Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Air pollution has been classified as carcinogenic to humans. However, to date little is known about the relevance for cancersof the stomach and upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). We investigated the association of long-term exposure to ambient airpollution with incidence of gastric and UADT cancer in 11 European cohorts. Air pollution exposure was assigned by land-useregression models for particulate matter (PM) below 10mm (PM10), below 2.5mm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10mm (PMcoarse),PM2.5absorbance and nitrogen oxides (NO2and NOX) as well as approximated by traffic indicators. Cox regression modelswith adjustment for potential confounders were used for cohort-specific analyses. Combined estimates were determined withrandom effects meta-analyses. During average follow-up of 14.1 years of 305,551 individuals, 744 incident cases of gastriccancer and 933 of UADT cancer occurred. The hazard ratio for an increase of 5mg/m3of PM2.5was 1.38 (95% CI 0.99; 1.92)for gastric and 1.05 (95% CI 0.62; 1.77) for UADT cancers. No associations were found for any of the other exposures consid-ered. Adjustment for additional confounders and restriction to study participants with stable addresses did not influencemarkedly the effect estimate for PM2.5and gastric cancer. Higher estimated risks of gastric cancer associated with PM2.5wasfound in men (HR 1.98 [1.30; 3.01]) as compared to women (HR 0.85 [0.5; 1.45]). This large multicentre cohort study showsan association between long-term exposure to PM2.5and gastric cancer, but not UADT cancers, suggesting that air pollutionmay contribute to gastric cancer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
ESCAPE, air pollution, epidemiology, gastric cancer, upper aerodigestive tract cancer
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147272 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31564 (DOI)000443392100009 ()29696642 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2018-11-05Bibliographically approved
Jackson, J. A., Olsson, D., Punnett, L., Burdorf, A., Järvholm, B. & Wahlström, J. (2018). Biomechanical risk factors for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment in a cohort of Swedish male construction workers.. In: : . Paper presented at 20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, Florence, August 26-30 , 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomechanical risk factors for surgically treated ulnar nerve entrapment in a cohort of Swedish male construction workers.
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152127 (URN)
Conference
20th Congress International Ergonomics Association, Florence, August 26-30 , 2018
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-01016
Available from: 2018-09-27 Created: 2018-09-27 Last updated: 2018-09-27
Bråbäck, L., Lowe, A. J., Lodge, C. J., Dharmage, S. C., Olsson, D. & Forsberg, B. (2018). Childhood asthma and smoking exposures before conception - a three-generational cohort study.. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 29(4), 361-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood asthma and smoking exposures before conception - a three-generational cohort study.
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2018 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Some human and animal studies have recently shown that maternal grandmother's smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of asthma in the grandchildren. We have investigated whether sex of the exposed parent and/or grandchild modifies the association between grandmaternal smoking and grandchild asthma.

METHODS: We formed a cohort study based on linkage of national registries with prospectively collected data over three generations. Smoking habits in early pregnancy were registered since 1982 and purchases of prescribed medication since 2005. In all, 10329 children born since 2005 had information on maternal and grandmaternal smoking on both sides and were followed from birth up to 6 years of age. Ages when medication was purchased were used to classify the cohort into never, early transient (0-3 years), early persistent (0-3 and 4-6 years) and late-onset (4-6 years) phenotypes of childhood asthma.

RESULTS: Maternal grandmother's smoking was associated with an increased odds of early persistent asthma after adjustment for maternal smoking and other confounders (odds ratio 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.51). Grandchild sex did not modify the association. Paternal grandmother's smoking was not associated with any of the asthma phenotypes.

CONCLUSION: Maternal but not paternal exposure to nicotine before conception was related to an increased risk of early persistent childhood asthma, but not other asthma phenotypes. Our findings are possibly consistent with a sex specific mode of epigenetic transfer. 

Keywords
childhood asthma, grandmother, multigenerational study, pregnancy, tobacco smoke
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145533 (URN)10.1111/pai.12883 (DOI)000434155900004 ()29512835 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-07-16Bibliographically approved
Lodge, C. J., Bråbäck, L., Lowe, A. J., Dharmage, S. C., Olsson, D. & Forsberg, B. (2018). Grandmaternal smoking increases asthma risk in grandchildren: a nationwide Swedish cohort. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 48(2), 167-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grandmaternal smoking increases asthma risk in grandchildren: a nationwide Swedish cohort
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2018 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in exposures prior to conception as possible risk factors for offspring asthma. Although partially supported by evidence from limited human studies, current evidence is inconsistent, and based on recall of exposure status.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate grandmaternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of asthma in grandchildren using prospectively collected population-based data.

METHODS: Information on grandmaternal and maternal smoking during pregnancy and grandchild use of asthma medications was collected from national Swedish registries. Associations between grandmaternal smoking during pregnancy (10-12 weeks), and asthma medication use in grandchildren were investigated using generalized estimating equations. Ages at which asthma medications were prescribed classified childhood asthma into never, early transient (0-3years), late onset (3-6 years) and early persistent (0-3 and 3-6 years) phenotypes.

RESULTS: From 1982 to 1986, 44,583 grandmothers gave birth to 46,197 mothers, who gave birth to 66,271 grandchildren (born 1996-2010). Children aged 1-6 years had an increased asthma risk if their grandmothers had smoked during pregnancy, with a higher risk for more exposure (10+ cigs/day; adjusted OR 1·23; 1·17, 1·30). Maternal smoking did not modify this relationship.

CONCLUSIONS & CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Children had an increased risk of asthma in the first six years of life if their grandmothers smoked during early pregnancy, independent of maternal smoking. Importantly this exhibited a dose-response relationship and was associated with a persistent childhood asthma phenotype. These findings support possible epigenetic transmission of risk from environmental exposures in previous generations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Asthma, Smoking, Transgenerational, cohort, epigenetics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140399 (URN)10.1111/cea.13031 (DOI)000423674000007 ()28925522 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pedersen, M., Stafoggia, M., Weinmayr, G., Andersen, Z. J., Galassi, C., Sommar, J., . . . Raaschou-Nielsen, O. (2018). Is there an association between ambient air pollution and bladder cancer incidence?: Analysis of 15 European cohorts. European Urology Focus, 4(1), 113-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there an association between ambient air pollution and bladder cancer incidence?: Analysis of 15 European cohorts
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2018 (English)In: European Urology Focus, ISSN 1540-0085, E-ISSN 1788-618X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Ambient air pollution contains low concentrations of carcinogens implicated in the etiology of urinary bladder cancer (BC). Little is known about whether exposure to air pollution influences BC in the general population.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and BC incidence.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We obtained data from 15 population-based cohorts enrolled between 1985 and 2005 in eight European countries (N=303431; mean follow-up 14.1 yr). We estimated exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), particulate matter (PM) with diameter <10μm (PM10), <2.5μm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10μm (PM2.5-10), PM2.5absorbance (soot), elemental constituents of PM, organic carbon, and traffic density at baseline home addresses using standardized land-use regression models from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects project.

OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: We used Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and meta-analyses to estimate summary hazard ratios (HRs) for BC incidence.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: During follow-up, 943 incident BC cases were diagnosed. In the meta-analysis, none of the exposures were associated with BC risk. The summary HRs associated with a 10-μg/m(3) increase in NO2 and 5-μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 were 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89-1.08) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.63-1.18), respectively. Limitations include the lack of information about lifetime exposure.

CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence of an association between exposure to outdoor air pollution levels at place of residence and risk of BC.

PATIENT SUMMARY: We assessed the link between outdoor air pollution at place of residence and bladder cancer using the largest study population to date and extensive assessment of exposure and comprehensive data on personal risk factors such as smoking. We found no association between the levels of outdoor air pollution at place of residence and bladder cancer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Air pollution, Bladder cancer, Environment, Prevention
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137924 (URN)10.1016/j.euf.2016.11.008 (DOI)000486142900029 ()28753823 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007499735 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-07-31 Created: 2017-07-31 Last updated: 2019-11-05Bibliographically approved
Andersen, Z. J., Pedersen, M., Weinmayr, G., Stafoggia, M., Galassi, C., Jørgensen, J. T., . . . Raaschou-Nielsen, O. (2018). Long-term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Brain Tumor: the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Paper presented at Neuro Oncol. 2018 Feb 19;20(3):420-432. doi: 10.1093/neuonc/nox163.. Neuro-Oncology, 20(3), 420-432
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Brain Tumor: the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)
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2018 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 420-432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and brain tumor risk is sparse and inconsistent.

Methods: In 12 cohorts from 6 European countries, individual estimates of annual mean air pollution levels at the baseline residence were estimated by standardized land-use regression models developed within the ESCAPE and TRANSPHORM projects: particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5, ≤10, and 2.5–10 μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx) and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations of air pollutant concentrations and traffic intensity with total, malignant, and nonmalignant brain tumor, in separate Cox regression models, adjusting for risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses.

Results: Of 282194 subjects from 12 cohorts, 466 developed malignant brain tumors during 12 years of follow-up. Six of the cohorts also had data on nonmalignant brain tumor, where among 106786 subjects, 366 developed brain tumor: 176 nonmalignant and 190 malignant. We found a positive, statistically nonsignificant association between malignant brain tumor and PM2.5 absorbance (hazard ratio and 95% CI: 1.67; 0.89–3.14 per 10–5/m3), and weak positive or null associations with the other pollutants. Hazard ratio for PM2.5 absorbance (1.01; 0.38–2.71 per 10–5/m3) and all other pollutants were lower for nonmalignant than for malignant brain tumors.

Conclusion: We found suggestive evidence of an association between long-term exposure to PM2.5 absorbance indicating traffic-related air pollution and malignant brain tumors, and no association with overall or nonmalignant brain tumors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
air pollution, brain cancer, brain tumor, traffic
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140538 (URN)10.1093/neuonc/nox163 (DOI)000425492600015 ()29016987 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042325926 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Neuro Oncol. 2018 Feb 19;20(3):420-432. doi: 10.1093/neuonc/nox163.
Available from: 2017-10-13 Created: 2017-10-13 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8965-4312

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