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Olsson, David
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Nagel, G., Stafoggia, M., Pedersen, M., Andersen, Z. J., Galassi, C., Munkenast, J., . . . Weinmayr, G. (2018). Air pollution and incidence of cancers of the stomach and the upper aerodigestive tract in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). International Journal of Cancer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Air pollution and incidence of cancers of the stomach and the upper aerodigestive tract in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

and gastric cancer, but not UADT cancers, suggesting that air pollution may contribute to gastric cancer risk. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
ESCAPE, air pollution, epidemiology, gastric cancer, upper aerodigestive tract cancer
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147272 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31564 (DOI)29696642 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-02 Created: 2018-05-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Bråbäck, L., Lowe, A. J., Lodge, C. J., Dharmage, S. C., Olsson, D. & Forsberg, B. (2018). Childhood asthma and smoking exposures before conception - a three-generational cohort study.. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 29(4), 361-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood asthma and smoking exposures before conception - a three-generational cohort study.
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2018 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Some human and animal studies have recently shown that maternal grandmother's smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of asthma in the grandchildren. We have investigated whether sex of the exposed parent and/or grandchild modifies the association between grandmaternal smoking and grandchild asthma.

METHODS: We formed a cohort study based on linkage of national registries with prospectively collected data over three generations. Smoking habits in early pregnancy were registered since 1982 and purchases of prescribed medication since 2005. In all, 10329 children born since 2005 had information on maternal and grandmaternal smoking on both sides and were followed from birth up to 6 years of age. Ages when medication was purchased were used to classify the cohort into never, early transient (0-3 years), early persistent (0-3 and 4-6 years) and late-onset (4-6 years) phenotypes of childhood asthma.

RESULTS: Maternal grandmother's smoking was associated with an increased odds of early persistent asthma after adjustment for maternal smoking and other confounders (odds ratio 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.51). Grandchild sex did not modify the association. Paternal grandmother's smoking was not associated with any of the asthma phenotypes.

CONCLUSION: Maternal but not paternal exposure to nicotine before conception was related to an increased risk of early persistent childhood asthma, but not other asthma phenotypes. Our findings are possibly consistent with a sex specific mode of epigenetic transfer. 

Keywords
childhood asthma, grandmother, multigenerational study, pregnancy, tobacco smoke
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-145533 (URN)10.1111/pai.12883 (DOI)000434155900004 ()29512835 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-09 Created: 2018-03-09 Last updated: 2018-07-16Bibliographically approved
Lodge, C. J., Bråbäck, L., Lowe, A. J., Dharmage, S. C., Olsson, D. & Forsberg, B. (2018). Grandmaternal smoking increases asthma risk in grandchildren: a nationwide Swedish cohort. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 48(2), 167-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grandmaternal smoking increases asthma risk in grandchildren: a nationwide Swedish cohort
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2018 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in exposures prior to conception as possible risk factors for offspring asthma. Although partially supported by evidence from limited human studies, current evidence is inconsistent, and based on recall of exposure status.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate grandmaternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of asthma in grandchildren using prospectively collected population-based data.

METHODS: Information on grandmaternal and maternal smoking during pregnancy and grandchild use of asthma medications was collected from national Swedish registries. Associations between grandmaternal smoking during pregnancy (10-12 weeks), and asthma medication use in grandchildren were investigated using generalized estimating equations. Ages at which asthma medications were prescribed classified childhood asthma into never, early transient (0-3years), late onset (3-6 years) and early persistent (0-3 and 3-6 years) phenotypes.

RESULTS: From 1982 to 1986, 44,583 grandmothers gave birth to 46,197 mothers, who gave birth to 66,271 grandchildren (born 1996-2010). Children aged 1-6 years had an increased asthma risk if their grandmothers had smoked during pregnancy, with a higher risk for more exposure (10+ cigs/day; adjusted OR 1·23; 1·17, 1·30). Maternal smoking did not modify this relationship.

CONCLUSIONS & CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Children had an increased risk of asthma in the first six years of life if their grandmothers smoked during early pregnancy, independent of maternal smoking. Importantly this exhibited a dose-response relationship and was associated with a persistent childhood asthma phenotype. These findings support possible epigenetic transmission of risk from environmental exposures in previous generations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Asthma, Smoking, Transgenerational, cohort, epigenetics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140399 (URN)10.1111/cea.13031 (DOI)000423674000007 ()28925522 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Andersen, Z. J., Pedersen, M., Weinmayr, G., Stafoggia, M., Galassi, C., Jørgensen, J. T., . . . Raaschou-Nielsen, O. (2018). Long-term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Brain Tumor: the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Paper presented at Neuro Oncol. 2018 Feb 19;20(3):420-432. doi: 10.1093/neuonc/nox163.. Neuro-Oncology, 20(3), 420-432
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Brain Tumor: the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE)
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2018 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 420-432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and brain tumor risk is sparse and inconsistent.

Methods: In 12 cohorts from 6 European countries, individual estimates of annual mean air pollution levels at the baseline residence were estimated by standardized land-use regression models developed within the ESCAPE and TRANSPHORM projects: particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5, ≤10, and 2.5–10 μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx) and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations of air pollutant concentrations and traffic intensity with total, malignant, and nonmalignant brain tumor, in separate Cox regression models, adjusting for risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses.

Results: Of 282194 subjects from 12 cohorts, 466 developed malignant brain tumors during 12 years of follow-up. Six of the cohorts also had data on nonmalignant brain tumor, where among 106786 subjects, 366 developed brain tumor: 176 nonmalignant and 190 malignant. We found a positive, statistically nonsignificant association between malignant brain tumor and PM2.5 absorbance (hazard ratio and 95% CI: 1.67; 0.89–3.14 per 10–5/m3), and weak positive or null associations with the other pollutants. Hazard ratio for PM2.5 absorbance (1.01; 0.38–2.71 per 10–5/m3) and all other pollutants were lower for nonmalignant than for malignant brain tumors.

Conclusion: We found suggestive evidence of an association between long-term exposure to PM2.5 absorbance indicating traffic-related air pollution and malignant brain tumors, and no association with overall or nonmalignant brain tumors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
air pollution, brain cancer, brain tumor, traffic
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140538 (URN)10.1093/neuonc/nox163 (DOI)000425492600015 ()29016987 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042325926 (Scopus ID)
Conference
Neuro Oncol. 2018 Feb 19;20(3):420-432. doi: 10.1093/neuonc/nox163.
Available from: 2017-10-13 Created: 2017-10-13 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Carlsen, H. K., Bäck, E., Eneroth, K., Gislason, T., Holm, M., Janson, C., . . . Orru, H. (2017). Indicators of residential traffic exposure: Modelled NOX, traffic proximity, and self-reported exposure in RHINE III. Atmospheric Environment, 167, 416-425
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indicators of residential traffic exposure: Modelled NOX, traffic proximity, and self-reported exposure in RHINE III
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2017 (English)In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, Vol. 167, p. 416-425Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few studies have investigated associations between self-reported and modelled exposure to traffic pollution. The objective of this study was to examine correlations between self-reported traffic exposure and modelled (a) NOx and (b) traffic proximity in seven different northern European cities; Aarhus (Denmark), Bergen (Norway), Gothenburg, Ulna and Uppsala (Sweden), Reykjavik (Iceland), and Tartu (Estonia). We analysed data from the RHINE III (Respiratory Health in Northern Europe, www.rhine.nu) cohorts of the seven study cities. Traffic proximity (distance to the nearest road with >10,000 vehicles per day) was calculated and vehicle exhaust (NOx) was modelled using dispersion models and land-use regression (LUR) data from 2011. Participants were asked a question about self-reported traffic intensity near bedroom window and another about traffic noise exposure at the residence. The data were analysed using rank correlation (Kendall's tau) and inter-rater agreement (Cohen's Kappa) between tertiles of modelled NOx and traffic proximity tertile and traffic proximity categories (0-150 metres (m), 150 -200 m, >300 m) in each centre. Data on variables of interest were available for 50-99% of study participants per each cohort. Mean modelled NOx levels were between 6.5 and 16.0 mu g/m(3); median traffic intensity was between 303 and 10,750 m in each centre. In each centre, 7.7-18.7% of respondents reported exposure to high traffic intensity and 3.6-16.3% of respondents reported high exposure to traffic noise. Self-reported residential traffic exposure had low or no correlation with modelled exposure and traffic proximity in all centres, although results were statistically significant (tau = 0.057-0.305). Self reported residential traffic noise correlated weakly (tau = 0.090-0.255), with modelled exposure in all centres except Reykjavik. Modelled NOx\] had the highest correlations between self-reported and modelled traffic exposure in five of seven centres, traffic noise exposure had the highest correlation with traffic proximity in tertiles in three centres. Self-reported exposure to high traffic intensity and traffic noise at each participant's residence had low or weak although statistically significant correlations with modelled vehicle exhaust pollution levels and traffic proximity.

Keywords
Traffic exposure, Noise exposure, Dispersion models, Land-use regression models, NOx, Cohort study
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142482 (URN)10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.08.015 (DOI)000412612200036 ()2-s2.0-85028350198 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Andersen, Z. J., Stafoggia, M., Weinmayr, G., Pedersen, M., Galassi, C., Jørgensen, J. T., . . . Raaschou-Nielsen, O. (2017). Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in 15 European cohorts within the ESCAPE project. Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, 125(10), Article ID 107005.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in 15 European cohorts within the ESCAPE project
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 125, no 10, article id 107005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and breast cancer risk is inconsistent.

OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in European women.

METHODS: In 15 cohorts from nine European countries, individual estimates of air pollution levels at the residence were estimated by standardized land-use regression models developed within the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) and Transport related Air Pollution and Health impacts – Integrated Methodologies for Assessing Particulate Matter (TRANSPHORM) projects: particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5μm, ≤10μm, and 2.5–10μm in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse, respectively); PM2.5 absorbance; nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx); traffic intensity; and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations between breast cancer and air pollutants using Cox regression models, adjusting for major lifestyle risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses.

RESULTS: Of 74,750 postmenopausal women included in the study, 3,612 developed breast cancer during 991,353 person-years of follow-up. We found positive and statistically insignificant associations between breast cancer and PM2.5 {hazard ratio (HR)=1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77, 1.51] per 5 μg/m(3)}, PM10 [1.07 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.30) per 10 μg/m(3)], PMcoarse[1.20 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.49 per 5 μg/m(3)], and NO(2) [1.02 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.07 per 10 μg/m(3)], and a statistically significant association with NOx [1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.08) per 20 μg/m(3), p=0.04].

CONCLUSIONS: We found suggestive evidence of an association between ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in European women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Research triangle park: US department of health, 2017
Keywords
use regression models, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, particulate matter, California teachers, lung cancer, environmental pollutants, PM2.5 absorbency, Great Britain, New York, risk
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-141105 (URN)10.1289/EHP1742 (DOI)000413793300017 ()29033383 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-25 Created: 2017-10-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Raaschou-Nielsen, O., Pedersen, M., Stafoggia, M., Weinmayr, G., Andersen, Z. J., Galassi, C., . . . Hoek, G. (2017). Outdoor air pollution and risk for kidney parenchyma cancer in 14 European cohorts. International Journal of Cancer, 140(7), 1528-1537
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outdoor air pollution and risk for kidney parenchyma cancer in 14 European cohorts
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2017 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, no 7, p. 1528-1537Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several studies have indicated weakly increased risk for kidney cancer among occupational groups exposed to gasoline vapors, engine exhaust, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other air pollutants, although not consistently. It was the aim to investigate possible associations between outdoor air pollution at the residence and the incidence of kidney parenchyma cancer in the general population. We used data from 14 European cohorts from the ESCAPE study. We geocoded and assessed air pollution concentrations at baseline addresses by land-use regression models for particulate matter (PM10 , PM2.5 , PMcoarse , PM2.5 absorbance (soot)) and nitrogen oxides (NO2 , NOx ), and collected data on traffic. We used Cox regression models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random effects models for meta-analyses to calculate summary hazard ratios (HRs). The 289,002 cohort members contributed 4,111,908 person-years at risk. During follow-up (mean 14.2 years) 697 incident cancers of the kidney parenchyma were diagnosed. The meta-analyses showed higher HRs in association with higher PM concentration, e.g. HR=1.57 (95%CI: 0.81-3.01) per 5μg/m(3) PM2.5 and HR=1.36 (95%CI: 0.84-2.19) per 10(-5) m(-1) PM2.5 absorbance, albeit never statistically significant. The HRs in association with nitrogen oxides and traffic density on the nearest street were slightly above one. Sensitivity analyses among participants who did not change residence during follow-up showed stronger associations, but none were statistically significant. This study provides suggestive evidence that exposure to outdoor PM at the residence may be associated with higher risk for kidney parenchyma cancer; the results should be interpreted cautiously as associations may be due to chance.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129398 (URN)10.1002/ijc.30587 (DOI)000395177200007 ()28006861 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-27 Created: 2016-12-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pedersen, M., Stafoggia, M., Weinmayr, G., Andersen, Z. J., Galassi, C., Sommar, J., . . . Raaschou-Nielsen, O. (2016). Is there an association between ambient air pollution and bladder cancer incidence? Analysis of 15 European cohorts.. European Urology Focus
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there an association between ambient air pollution and bladder cancer incidence? Analysis of 15 European cohorts.
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2016 (English)In: European Urology Focus, ISSN 1540-0085, E-ISSN 1788-618XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Ambient air pollution contains low concentrations of carcinogens implicated in the etiology of urinary bladder cancer (BC). Little is known about whether exposure to air pollution influences BC in the general population.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and BC incidence.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We obtained data from 15 population-based cohorts enrolled between 1985 and 2005 in eight European countries (N=303431; mean follow-up 14.1 yr). We estimated exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), particulate matter (PM) with diameter <10μm (PM10), <2.5μm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10μm (PM2.5-10), PM2.5absorbance (soot), elemental constituents of PM, organic carbon, and traffic density at baseline home addresses using standardized land-use regression models from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects project.

OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: We used Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and meta-analyses to estimate summary hazard ratios (HRs) for BC incidence.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: During follow-up, 943 incident BC cases were diagnosed. In the meta-analysis, none of the exposures were associated with BC risk. The summary HRs associated with a 10-μg/m(3) increase in NO2 and 5-μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 were 0.98 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89-1.08) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.63-1.18), respectively. Limitations include the lack of information about lifetime exposure.

CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence of an association between exposure to outdoor air pollution levels at place of residence and risk of BC.

PATIENT SUMMARY: We assessed the link between outdoor air pollution at place of residence and bladder cancer using the largest study population to date and extensive assessment of exposure and comprehensive data on personal risk factors such as smoking. We found no association between the levels of outdoor air pollution at place of residence and bladder cancer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Air pollution, Bladder cancer, Environment, Prevention
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137924 (URN)10.1016/j.euf.2016.11.008 (DOI)28753823 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-07-31 Created: 2017-07-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Vicedo-Cabrera, A. M., Olsson, D. & Forsberg, B. (2015). Exposure to Seasonal Temperatures during the Last Month of Gestation and the Risk of Preterm Birth in Stockholm. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 12(4), 3962-3978
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure to Seasonal Temperatures during the Last Month of Gestation and the Risk of Preterm Birth in Stockholm
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 3962-3978Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent evidence from studies performed mainly in warm climates suggests an association between exposure to extreme temperatures late in pregnancy and an increased risk of preterm delivery. However, there have been fewer studies on the effect of low temperatures. The aim of this study is to explore the potential association between both heat and cold during late pregnancy and an increased risk of preterm birth in the northern location of Stockholm, Sweden. All singleton spontaneous births that took place in greater Stockholm (1998-2006) were included. Non-linear and delayed effects of mean temperature on the risk of preterm birth were explored through distributed lag non-linear models. Extreme and moderate heat and cold were estimated separately through quasi-Poisson regression analysis in two seasonal periods (heat in warm season, cold in cold season). The risk of preterm birth increased by 4%-5% when the mean temperature reached the 75th percentile (moderate heat) four weeks earlier (reference: the annual median value), with a maximum cumulative risk ratio of 2.50 (95% confidence interval: 1.02-6.15). Inconsistent associations were obtained for cold and extreme heat. Exposure to moderately high temperatures during late pregnancy might be associated with an increase in risk of preterm birth in Stockholm.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-101786 (URN)10.3390/ijerph120403962 (DOI)000353488500036 ()
Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-04-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Olsson, D., Mogren, I., Eneroth, K. & Forsberg, B. (2015). Traffic pollution at the home address and pregnancy outcomes in Stockholm, Sweden. BMJ Open, 5(8), Article ID e007034.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traffic pollution at the home address and pregnancy outcomes in Stockholm, Sweden
2015 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 8, article id e007034Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: For the past two decades, several studies have reported associations between elevated levels of ambient air pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes, although with varying conclusions.

OBJECTIVES: To examine possible associations between the traffic pollution situation at the home address, for women who did not change address during pregnancy, and three types of pregnancy outcomes: spontaneous preterm delivery, children born small for gestational age (SGA) and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders.

METHODS: We used data for the Greater Stockholm Area from the Swedish Medical Birth Register to construct a cohort based on all pregnancies conceived between July 1997 and March 2006, n=100 190. The pregnancy average nitrogen oxide, NOx, levels and annual mean daily vehicles at the home address were used as exposure variables. Mixed-model logistic regression was performed to assess any associations between exposure and outcome.

RESULTS: There was an association between elevated traffic pollution exposure during pregnancy and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders. A 10 µg/m(3) increase in the pregnancy average NOx level at the home address resulted in an OR of 1.17 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.26). The 2nd to 4th quartiles of NOx were all associated with an increased risk of SGA, but there was no difference in the risk estimate among the higher quartiles. There was a tendency of a higher risk of spontaneous preterm delivery in relation to higher levels of NOx. There was no evidence of an association between vehicle flow, the cruder indicator of traffic pollution, and the studied outcomes in this study.

CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort, there was a fairly strong association between vehicle exhaust levels at the home address and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders, after adjustment for important risk factors.

Keywords
Air Pollution, Pregnancy Outcome
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-108000 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007034 (DOI)000363479100006 ()26275899 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84941551737 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-01 Created: 2015-09-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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