umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Hassmén, Peter
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Nyström, M., Hassmén, P., Eriksson Sörman, D., Wigforss, T., Andersson, G. & Carlbring, P. (2019). Are physical activity and sedentary behavior related to depression?. COGENT PSYCHOLOGY, 6(1), Article ID 1633810.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are physical activity and sedentary behavior related to depression?
Show others...
2019 (English)In: COGENT PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 1633810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depression is an increasing public health concern with rising prevalence. Nevertheless, far from everyone seeks help or receives adequate treatment. Although psychotherapy and antidepressants still constitute the bulk of treatments offered, recent research suggests that physical activity (PA) can be a powerful adjunct therapy while sedentary behavior (SB) is a definite risk factor for developing depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between PA, SB and depressive symptoms in a population (n = 962) of applicants for an online treatment study. This study hypothesised that there will be; (1) a positive relationship between SB and depressive symptoms, and (2) a negative relationship between PA and depressive symptoms. In addition we investigated whether the combination of a sedentary lifestyle and physical inactivity increased the risk for depressive symptoms. Finally, we also examined whether gender, age, marital status, educational level, or medication affected the relationship between PA, SB, and depressive symptoms. The results showed a positive correlation between SB and depression. There was, however, no statistically significant support for a negative relation between PA and depressive symptoms. Even though no conclusions about causality can be drawn, our results suggest that high SB, being a woman, being young, not being in a stable relationship, and current or previous medication are risk factors for depression. To be able to determine the causal direction, that is, whether high SB increases the risk for depressive symptoms, or if depressive symptoms increase the likelihood of high SB, further research is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Depression, physical activity, sedentary behavior, online treatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161713 (URN)10.1080/23311908.2019.1633810 (DOI)000473610600001 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011-0477Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0205
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved
Nyström, M. B. T., Stenling, A., Sjöström, E., Neely, G., Lindner, P., Hassmén, P., . . . Carlbring, P. (2017). Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Affective Disorders, 215, 85-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 215, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A major problem today is that only about fifty percent of those affected by depression seeks help. One way to reach more sufferers would be by offering easily accessible internet based treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare/evaluate four therapist supported internet administered treatments.

Method/results: Two hundred eighty six participants were included. The treatment period lasted twelve weeks, consisting of the following treatments: 1) physical activity without treatment rational, 2) physical activity with treatment rational, 3) behavioral activation without treatment rational and 4) behavioral activation with treatment rational. All groups (including a control-group) showed a significant decrease in depressive symptoms. When the treatment groups were pooled and compared to the control group, there were significant differences from pretest to posttest (Hedges gav treatment =1.01, control group =0.47). This held true also when each of the four treatment groups was compared to the control group, with one exception: Physical activity without treatment rationale.

Limitations: The differences between how many modules the participants completed could indicate that there are other factors than the treatments that caused the symptom reduction, however, the dose-response analysis did not detect any significant differences on account of modules completed.

Conclusions: The results support the positive effects of internet administered treatments for depression, and highlights the importance of psychoeducation, which tends to affect both the treatment outcome and the probability of remaining in treatment. These aspects need to be considered when developing and conducting new treatments for depression, since they would increase the likelihood of positive treatment outcomes.

Keywords
Depression, Physical activity, Behavioral activation, Treatment, RCT, Growth curve modeling
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136322 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2017.03.018 (DOI)000401213300012 ()28319696 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, FORTE 2011-0477
Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, E., Gustafsson, H., Davis, P. & Hassmén, P. (2016). Workaholism, home-work/work-home interference, and exhaustion among sport coaches. Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, 10(3), 222-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workaholism, home-work/work-home interference, and exhaustion among sport coaches
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 222-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims of this study were to (a) examine the associations between workaholismand work-related exhaustion and (b) examine associations between work–home/home–work interference and work-related exhaustion in 261 Swedish coaches.Quantile regression showed that workaholism is only associated with exhaustionfor coaches who score high on exhaustion, that negative work–home interferencehas a stronger association with exhaustion than negative home–work interference,and that the coaches on a mean level scored low on all measured constructs. Inaddition, coaches in the higher percentiles have a higher risk for burnout. Ourresults highlight the importance of studying coach exhaustion with respect toaspects that extend beyond the sports life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2016
Keywords
burnout, coaching, quantile regression, work–family conflict
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-98055 (URN)10.1123/jcsp.2015-0029 (DOI)000398366100004 ()2-s2.0-84995685448 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2013-0075
Available from: 2015-01-14 Created: 2015-01-14 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
Stenling, A., Lindwall, M. & Hassmén, P. (2015). Changes in Perceived Autonomy Support, Need Satisfaction, Motivation, and Well-Being in Young Elite Athletes. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 4(1), 50-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in Perceived Autonomy Support, Need Satisfaction, Motivation, and Well-Being in Young Elite Athletes
2015 (English)In: Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, ISSN 2157-3905, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 50-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A 4-stage motivational sequence was investigated, in line with self-determination theory (perceived autonomy support from the coach → need satisfaction → motivation → psychological well-being). More specifically, we examined level–change associations and relations between intraindividual changes in these variables over the course of an athletic season. Young elite skiers (109 females, 138 males) enrolled at sport high schools in Sweden responded to questionnaires assessing perceived autonomy support from the coach, need satisfaction, motivation, and psychological well-being at 2 time points separated by approximately 5 months. A latent difference score model were used to analyze the data. Initial level of need satisfaction at Time 1 negatively predicted change in perceived autonomy support, motivation, and well-being, and initial level of motivation at Time 1 positively predicted change in perceived autonomy support and change in well-being. Correlations between intraindividual changes in the study variables were estimated and the variables were all positively correlated. These results indicate that the relations between these variables are complex, dynamic, and that more attention should be given to potential reciprocal effects between the variables in this motivational sequence.

Keywords
intraindividual change, interpersonal environment, basic psychological needs, motivation, health
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93441 (URN)10.1037/spy0000027 (DOI)000356672200005 ()
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2011-0177
Available from: 2014-09-22 Created: 2014-09-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nyström, M. B. T., Neely, G., Hassmén, P. & Carlbring, P. (2015). Treating Major Depression with Physical Activity: a Systematic Overview with Recommendations. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 44(4), 341-352
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treating Major Depression with Physical Activity: a Systematic Overview with Recommendations
2015 (Swedish)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this systematic overview was to determine the most effective mode and doseof physical activity (PA) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD), and to suggest guidelines and recommendations for clinicians. The selection process consisted of a comprehensive search that was conducted up until April 2014 in the following databases: sycINFO, Medline, PubMed and Scopus. The inclusion criteria were: (1) a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, (2) complete description of intensity, duration and frequency of the PA, (3) the participants had to be diagnosed with MDD according to Diagnostic Statistical Manual 4 th edition (DSM-IV) or International Classification of Disease tenth Revision (ICD-10) criteria (4) if the controls received any treatment, it had to be specified, (5) published after 1990, (6) consist of aerobic or anaerobic treatment PA, and (7) not be a pilotor preliminary study. A quality assessment of each study was conducted independently by two reviewers; this stringent selection process resulted in 12 reviewed studies. Conclusion: individually customized PA, for at least 30 minutes, preferably performed under supervision and with a frequency of at least three times per week is recommended when treating MDD. hese recommendations must be viewed in light of the relatively few studies matching the inclusion criteria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
RCT, treatment, physical activity, depression, major depression
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104393 (URN)10.1080/16506073.2015.1015440 (DOI)000355812000010 ()
Available from: 2015-06-10 Created: 2015-06-10 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Stenling, A., Ivarsson, A., Hassmén, P. & Lindwall, M. (2015). Using bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling to examine global and specific factors in measures of sports coaches’ interpersonal styles. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, Article ID 1303.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling to examine global and specific factors in measures of sports coaches’ interpersonal styles
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the present work we investigated distinct sources of construct-relevant psychometric multidimensionality in two sport-specific measures of coaches’ need-supportive (ISS-C) and controlling interpersonal (CCBS) styles. A recently proposed bifactor exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) framework was employed to achieve this aim. In Study 1, using a sample of floorball players, the results indicated that the ISS-C can be considered as a unidimensional measure, with one global factor explaining most of the variance in the items. In Study 2, using a sample of male ice hockey players, the results indicated that the items in the CCBS are represented by both a general factor and specific factors, but the subscales differ with regard to the amount of variance in the items accounted for by the general and specific factors. These results add further insight into the psychometric properties of these two measures and the dimensionality of these two constructs.

Keywords
Controlling behaviors, Dimensionality, Leadership, Need support, Self-report scales
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-107023 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01303 (DOI)000360530500002 ()
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2014-0043
Available from: 2015-08-17 Created: 2015-08-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lindner, P., Nyström, M. B. .., Hassmén, P., Andersson, G. & Carlbring, P. (2015). Who seeks ICBT for depression and how do they get there?: Effects of recruitment source on patient demographics and clinical characteristics. Internet Interventions, 2, 221-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who seeks ICBT for depression and how do they get there?: Effects of recruitment source on patient demographics and clinical characteristics
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Internet Interventions, Vol. 2, p. 221-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies on internet-administered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) frequently use several different sources of recruitment, yet no study has investigated whether different recruitment sources produce different clinical and demographic profiles among participants. Using data from a large sample (n=982) seeking ICBT for depression, we compared these characteristics on the basis of self-reported recruitment source. Recruitment sources that imply more active treatment- seeking behaviors (Google searches, viewing postings on mental health websites) presentedmore severe depression and anxiety than those recruited throughmore passive sources of information (newspaper advertisements, referrals by friends and family). In addition, a number of demographic differences between groups were found. These findings have important implications for ICBT research projects and clinical programs who employ open recruitment procedures and multi-modal recruitment strategies, and who wish to recruit representative samples or target specific subgroups. Replications in other countries will however be required to establish cross-cultural patterns. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104397 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2015.04.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-06-10 Created: 2015-06-10 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lundkvist, E., Stenling, A., Gustafsson, H. & Hassmén, P. (2014). How to measure coach burnout: an evaluation of three burnout measures. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 18(3), 209-226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to measure coach burnout: an evaluation of three burnout measures
2014 (English)In: Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, ISSN 1091-367X, E-ISSN 1532-7841, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 209-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although coach burnout has been studied for 30 years, what measure to use in this context has not yet been problematized. This study focuses on evaluating convergent and discriminant validity of three coach burnout measures by using multi-trait/multi-method analysis (CT-C[M-1]) model. We choose Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the two dimensional Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI), and a coach version of Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (CBQ). Our analysis shows that MBI and OLBI cover similar definitions of exhaustion and depersonalization/disengagement and that CBQ measures somewhat different dimensions. A problem for OLBI is a lack of discriminant validity due to high correlations between exhaustion and disengagement. For lack of personal accomplishment/reduced sense of accomplishment CBQ measures a somewhat different construct than MBI. Although all three measures have advantages and disadvantages, we promote CBQ since it discriminates between dimensions and covers important aspects of burnout in a sports context that the other two do not cover.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2014
Keywords
convergent validity, discriminant validity, Maslach burnout inventory, Oldenburg burnout inventory, coach burnout inventory
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93440 (URN)10.1080/1091367X.2014.925455 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-09-22 Created: 2014-09-22 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Stenling, A., Hassmén, P. & Holmström, S. (2014). Implicit beliefs of ability, approach-avoidance goals and cognitive anxiety among team sport athletes. European Journal of Sport Science, 14(7), 720-729
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implicit beliefs of ability, approach-avoidance goals and cognitive anxiety among team sport athletes
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Sport Science, ISSN 1746-1391, E-ISSN 1536-7290, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 720-729Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People’s implicit beliefs of ability have been suggested as an antecedent of achievement goal adoption, which has in turn been associated with behavioural, cognitive and affective outcomes. This study examined a conditional process model with team sport athletes’ approach-avoidance achievement goals as mediators between their implicit beliefs of sport ability and sport-related cognitive anxiety. We expected gender to moderate the paths from implicit beliefs of ability to approach-avoidance goals and from approach-avoidance goals to cognitive anxiety. Team sport athletes with a mean age of 20 years (163 females and 152 males) responded to questionnaires about their implicit beliefs of sport ability, approach-avoidance goals and sport-related cognitive anxiety. Incremental beliefs, gender and the interaction between them predicted mastery approach goals. Gender also predicted mastery-avoidance goals, with females reporting higher levels than males. Mastery- avoidance goals, gender and the interaction between them predicted cognitive anxiety, with females reporting higher levels of anxiety than males. Entity beliefs positively predicted performance-avoidance goals and the interaction between performance-approach and gender predicted anxiety. The indirect effects also showed gender differences in relation to performance-approach goals. Taken together, our results suggest that coaches trying to create a facilitating climate for their male and female athletes may be wise to consider their athletes’ anxiety and achievement goal patterns as these may affect both the athletes’ well-being and performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2014
Keywords
motivation, gender differences, anxiety, team sports, conditional process model
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87621 (URN)10.1080/17461391.2014.901419 (DOI)000342285700011 ()
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, P2011-0177
Available from: 2014-04-06 Created: 2014-04-06 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ström, M., Uckelstam, C.-J., Andersson, G., Hassmén, P., Umefjord, G. & Carlbring, P. (2013). Internet-delivered therapist-guided physical activity for mild to moderate depression: a randomized controlled trial. PeerJ, 1, Article ID e178.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-delivered therapist-guided physical activity for mild to moderate depression: a randomized controlled trial
Show others...
2013 (English)In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 1, article id e178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. The main hypothesis, and the objective of the study, was to test if the participants allocated to the treatment group would show a larger reduction in depressive symptoms than those in the control group. Methods. This study was a randomized nine week trial of an Internet-administered treatment based on guided physical exercise for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). A total of 48 participants with mild to moderate depression, diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, were randomized either to a treatment intervention or to a waiting-list control group. The main outcome measure for depression was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and physical activity level was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). The treatment program consisted of nine text modules, and included therapist guidance on a weekly basis. Results. The results showed significant reductions of depressive symptoms in the treatment group compared to the control group, with a moderate between-group effect size (Cohen's d = 0.67; 95% confidence interval: 0.09-1.25). No difference was found between the groups with regards to increase of physical activity level. For the treatment group, the reduction in depressive symptoms persisted at six months follow-up. Conclusions. Physical activity as a treatment for depression can be delivered in the form of guided Internet-based self-help.

Keywords
Physical activity, Depression, Internet, Psychotherapy, Treatment, RCT
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104194 (URN)10.7717/peerj.178 (DOI)000209190400003 ()24109561 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-18 Created: 2015-06-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications