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Lindberg, Richard
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Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Gojkovic, Z., Lindberg, R., Tysklind, M. & Funk, C. (2019). Northern green algae have the capacity to remove active pharmaceutical ingredients. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 170, 644-656
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Northern green algae have the capacity to remove active pharmaceutical ingredients
2019 (English)In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 170, p. 644-656Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eight recently isolated microalgal species from Northern Sweden and the culture collection strain Scenedesmus obliquus RISE (UTEX 417) were tested for their ability to remove 19 pharmaceuticals from growth medium upon cultivation in short light path, flat panel photobioreactors. While the growth of one algal species, Chlorellasorokiniana B1-1, was completely inhibited by the addition of pharmaceuticals, and the one of Scenedesmus sp. B2-2 was strongly inhibited, the other algal strains grew well and produced biomass.

In general, lipophilic compounds were removed highly efficient from the culture medium by the microalgae (>70% in average within 2 days). The most lipophilic compounds Biperiden, Trihexyphenidyl, Clomipramine and Amitriptyline significantly accumulated in the biomass of most algal species, with a positive correlation between accumulation and their total biomass content. More persistent in the growth medium were hydrophilic compounds like Caffeine, Fluconazole, Trimetoprim, Codeine, Carbamazepin, Oxazepam and Tramadol, which were detected in amounts of above 60% in average after algal treatment.

While Coelastrella sp. 3–4 and Coelastrum astroideum RW10 were most efficient to accumulate certain compounds in their biomass, two algae species, Chlorella vulgaris13-1 and Chlorella saccharophila RNY, were not only highly efficient in removing all 19 pharmaceuticals from the growth medium within 12 days, at the same time only small amounts of these compounds accumulated in their biomass allowing its further use. Chlorella vulgaris 13-1 was able to remove most compounds within 6 days of growth, while Chlorella saccharophila RNY needed 8–10 days.”Wild” Nordic microalgae therefore are able to remove active pharmaceutical ingredients, equally or more efficient than the investigated culture collection strain, thereby demonstrating their possible use in sustainable wastewater reclamation in Nordic conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Pharmaceuticals, Green microalgae, Photodegradation, Removal efficiency
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156578 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoenv.2018.12.032 (DOI)000456890700078 ()30579165 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 2013-006259Swedish Energy Agency, 38239-1Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-92Swedish Research Council Formas, 213-2014-1504VINNOVA, 2017-03301
Available from: 2019-02-22 Created: 2019-02-22 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
McCallum, E. S., Lindberg, R. H., Andersson, P. L. & Brodin, T. (2019). Stability and uptake of methylphenidate and ritalinic acid in nine-spine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius) and water louse (Asellus aquaticus). Environmental science and pollution research international, 26(9), 9371-9378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stability and uptake of methylphenidate and ritalinic acid in nine-spine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius) and water louse (Asellus aquaticus)
2019 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 9371-9378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The presence of human pharmaceuticals in the environment has garnered significant research attention because these compounds may exert therapeutic effects on exposed wildlife. Yet, for many compounds, there is still little research documenting their stability in the water column and uptake in organism tissues. Here, we measured the uptake and stability of methylphenidate (Ritalin (R), a frequently prescribed central nervous system stimulant) and its primary metabolite, ritalinic acid, in (1) water only or (2) with nine-spine stickleback and water louse. Methylphenidate degraded to ritalinic acid in both studies faster at a higher temperature (20 degrees C versus 10 degrees C), with concentrations of ritalinic acid surpassing methylphenidate after 48-100 h, depending on temperature. The concentration of methylphenidate in stickleback was highest at the first sampling point (60 min), while the concentration in water louse tissues reached comparatively higher levels and peaked after similar to 6 days. Neither stickleback nor water louse took up ritalinic acid in tissues despite being present in the water column. Our findings provide valuable data for use in future risk assessment of methylphenidate and will aid in the design of studies aimed at measuring any ecotoxicological effects on, for example, the behaviour or physiology of aquatic organisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Pharmaceuticals, Ecotoxicology, Stimulant, Behaviour, Methylphenidate, Aquatic organisms
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158603 (URN)10.1007/s11356-019-04557-9 (DOI)000464851100088 ()30805842 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Björlenius, B., Ripszám, M., Haglund, P., Lindberg, R. H., Tysklind, M. & Fick, J. (2018). Pharmaceutical residues are widespread in Baltic Sea coastal and offshore waters: Screening for pharmaceuticals and modelling of environmental concentrations of carbamazepine. Science of the Total Environment, 633, 1496-1509
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pharmaceutical residues are widespread in Baltic Sea coastal and offshore waters: Screening for pharmaceuticals and modelling of environmental concentrations of carbamazepine
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2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 633, p. 1496-1509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The consumption of pharmaceuticals worldwide coupled with modest removal efficiencies of sewage treatment plants have resulted in the presence of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems globally. In this study, we investigated the environmental concentrations of a selection of 93 pharmaceuticals in 43 locations in the Baltic Sea and Skagerrak. The Baltic Sea is vulnerable to anthropogenic activities due to a long turnover time and a sensitive ecosystem in the brackish water. Thirty-nine of 93 pharmaceuticals were detected in at least one sample, with concentrations ranging between 0.01 and 80 ng/L. One of the pharmaceuticals investigated, the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine, was widespread in coastal and offshore seawaters (present in 37 of 43 samples). In order to predict concentrations of pharmaceuticals in the sub-basins of the Baltic Sea, a mass balance-based grey box model was set up and the persistent, widely used carbamazepine was selected as the model substance. The model was based on hydrological and meteorological sub-basin characteristics, removal data from smaller watersheds and wastewater treatment plants, and statistics relating to population, consumption and excretion rate of carbamazepine in humans. The grey box model predicted average environmental concentrations of carbamazepine in sub-basins with no significant difference from the measured concentrations, amounting to 0.57–3.2 ng/L depending on sub-basin location. In the Baltic Sea, the removal rate of carbamazepine in seawater was estimated to be 6.2 10−9 s−1 based on a calculated half-life time of 3.5 years at 10 °C, which demonstrates the long response time of the environment to measures phasing out persistent or slowly degradable substances such as carbamazepine. Sampling, analysis and grey box modelling were all valuable in describing the presence and removal of carbamazepine in the Baltic Sea.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Coastal and offshore waters, Baltic Sea, Pharmaceuticals, Carbamazepine, Half-life time, Model
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146829 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.03.276 (DOI)000432475300145 ()29758901 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044791102 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ECOCHANGE
Available from: 2018-04-19 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Beijer, K., Bjorlenius, B., Shaik, S., Lindberg, R. H., Brunstrom, B. & Brandt, I. (2017). Removal of pharmaceuticals and unspecified contaminants in sewage treatment effluents by activated carbon filtration and ozonation: Evaluation using biomarker responses and chemical analysis. Chemosphere, 176, 342-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Removal of pharmaceuticals and unspecified contaminants in sewage treatment effluents by activated carbon filtration and ozonation: Evaluation using biomarker responses and chemical analysis
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2017 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 176, p. 342-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Traces of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and other chemicals are demonstrated in effluents from sewage treatment plants (STPs) and they may affect quality of surface water and eventually drinking water. Treatment of effluents with granular activated carbon (GAC) or ozone to improve removal of APIs and other contaminants was evaluated at two Swedish STPs, Kappala and Uppsala (88 and 103 APIs analyzed). Biomarker responses in rainbow trout exposed to regular and additionally treated effluents were determined. GAC and ozone treatment removed 87-95% of the total concentrations of APIs detected. In Kappala, GAC removed 20 and ozonation (7 g O-3/m(3)) 21 of 24 APIs detected in regular effluent. In Uppsala, GAC removed 25 and ozonation (5.4 g O-3/m(3)) 15 of 25 APIs detected in effluent. GAC and ozonation also reduced biomarker responses caused by unidentified pollutants in STP effluent water. Elevated ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in gills was observed in fish exposed to effluent in both STPs. Gene expression analysis carried out in Kappala showed increased concentrations of cytochrome P450 (CYP1A5 and CYP1C3) transcripts in gills and of CYP1As in liver of fish exposed to effluent. In fish exposed to GAC- or ozone-treated effluent water, gill EROD activity and expression of CYP1As and CYP1C3 in gills and liver were generally equal to or below levels in fish held in tap water. The joint application of chemical analysis and sensitive biomarkers proved useful for evaluating contaminant removal in STPs with new technologies.

Keywords
Wastewater, Activated carbon, Ozonation, Pharmaceuticals, Biomarkers, Rainbow trout
National Category
Water Treatment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135249 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.02.127 (DOI)000399849300039 ()28273541 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Östman, M., Lindberg, R. H., Fick, J., Björn, E. & Tysklind, M. (2017). Screening of biocides, metals and antibiotics in Swedish sewage sludge and wastewater. Water Research, 115, 318-328
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Screening of biocides, metals and antibiotics in Swedish sewage sludge and wastewater
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2017 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 115, p. 318-328Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Incoming sewage water, treated effluent and digested sludge were collected from 11 Swedish sewage treatment plants (STPs) on 3 different days. Analytical protocols were established for a large number of compounds (47) with antimicrobial properties and the collected samples were then screened for the presence of these selected substances. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to analyse the samples. Thirty organic compounds and 10 metals were detected above their respective detection limit. Quaternary ammonium compounds were the most abundant substances in the particulate phases with levels up to 370 μg/g and benzotriazoles were the most common in the aqueous phases with levels up to 24 μg/L. Several compounds with no, or very limited, previously reported data were detected in this study, including chlorhexidine, hexadecylpyridinium chloride and 10-benzalkonium chloride. Some of these were both frequently detected (>60% detection frequency) and found in high levels (up to 19 μg/g d.w. sludge). This study gives a comprehensive overview of the presence in Swedish STPs of a number of antimicrobial substances, providing crucial information in designing relevant studies on potential microbial co- and cross resistance development between antibiotics, biocides, and metals in the sewage system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Biocides, Antimicrobial, Antibiotics, Sewage water, Sludge, Wastewater
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132432 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2017.03.011 (DOI)000399848200031 ()
Available from: 2017-03-14 Created: 2017-03-14 Last updated: 2018-10-11Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, R. H., Fedorova, G., Blum, K. M., Pulit-Prociak, J., Gillman, A., Järhult, J., . . . Söderström, H. (2015). Online solid phase extraction liquid chromatography using bonded zwitterionic stationary phases and tandem mass spectrometry for rapid environmental trace analysis of highly polar hydrophilic compounds – Application for the antiviral drug Zanamivir. Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, 141, 164-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online solid phase extraction liquid chromatography using bonded zwitterionic stationary phases and tandem mass spectrometry for rapid environmental trace analysis of highly polar hydrophilic compounds – Application for the antiviral drug Zanamivir
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2015 (English)In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 141, p. 164-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Zanamivir (Za) is a highly polar and hydrophilic antiviral drug used for the treatment of influenza A viruses. Za has been detected in rivers of Japan and it's environmental occurrence has the risk of inducing antiviral resistant avian influenza viruses. In this study, a rapid automated online solid phase extraction liquid chromatography method using bonded zwitterionic stationary phases and tandem mass spectrometry (SPE/LC–MS/MS) for trace analysis of Za was developed. Furthermore, an internal standard (IS) calibration method capable of quantifying Za in Milli-Q, surface water, sewage effluent and sewage influent was evaluated. Optimum pre-extraction sample composition was found to be 95/5 v/v acetonitrile/water sample and 1% formic acid. The developed method showed acceptable linearities (r2≥0.994), filtration recovery (≥91%), and intra-day precisions (RSD≤16%), and acceptable and environmentally relevant LOQs (≤20 ng L−1). Storage tests showed no significant losses of Za during 20 days and +4/−20 °C (≤12%) with the exception of influent samples, which should be kept at −20 °C to avoid significant Za losses. The applicability of the method was demonstrated in a study on phototransformation of Za in unfiltered and filtered surface water during 28 days of artificial UV irradiation exposure. No significant (≤12%) phototransformation was found in surface water after 28 days suggesting a relatively high photostability of Za and that Za should be of environmental concern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Antivirals, Zanamivir, Online solid phase extraction, Liquid chromatography, ZIC-HILIC, Tandem mass spectrometry
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104589 (URN)10.1016/j.talanta.2015.03.066 (DOI)000356987500026 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 211-2013-1320
Available from: 2015-06-11 Created: 2015-06-11 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Östman, M., Fick, J., Näsström, E. & Lindberg, R. (2014). A snapshot of illicit drug use in Sweden acquired through sewage water analysis. Science of the Total Environment, 472, 862-871
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A snapshot of illicit drug use in Sweden acquired through sewage water analysis
2014 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 472, p. 862-871Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Analytical measurements of sewage water have been used many times to estimate the consumption of specific drugs in an area. This study measured a large number of illicit drugs and metabolites (>30) at a large number of sewage treatment plants (STPs) distributed across Sweden. Twenty-four illicit and prescription drugs, classified as narcotic substances in Sweden, and seven selected metabolites were included in the study. A 24 hour composite sample of incoming sewage water was collected from 33 different municipalities at various geographic locations across Sweden. Species were analyzed using an on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method. The method proved to be rapid with minimum need for sample work up and was able to detect 13 compounds above their respective limits of quantification. The results for all compounds were presented as per capita loads. Multivariate data analysis was used to relate drug consumption to geographical location and/or population of cities. The results showed that geographical differences in drug consumption were apparent across the country. For the narcotic pharmaceuticals, the geographical differences suggested by the multivariate model were supported by prescription statistics. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Illicit drugs, Wastewater, Analysis, LC-MS/MS, Multivariate data analysis, Sweden
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-87410 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.11.081 (DOI)000331916100095 ()
Available from: 2014-04-01 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Berglund, B., Khan, G. A., Lindberg, R., Fick, J. & Lindgren, P.-E. (2014). Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms. PLoS ONE, 9(9), Article ID e108151.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms
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2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e108151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters) in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intL1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.86x10(4) copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

National Category
Microbiology Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-104159 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0108151 (DOI)000342351800068 ()25247418 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-18 Created: 2015-06-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Singer, A. C., Järhult, J. D., Grabic, R., Khan, G. A., Lindberg, R. H., Fedorova, G., . . . Söderström, H. (2014). Intra- and inter-pandemic variations of antiviral, antibiotics and decongestants in wastewater treatment plants and receiving rivers. PLoS ONE, 9(9), e108621
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra- and inter-pandemic variations of antiviral, antibiotics and decongestants in wastewater treatment plants and receiving rivers
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2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108621-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concentration of eleven antibiotics (trimethoprim, oxytetracycline, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, cefotaxime, doxycycline, sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, clarithromycin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin), three decongestants (naphazoline, oxymetazoline, xylometazoline) and the antiviral drug oseltamivir's active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), were measured weekly at 21 locations within the River Thames catchment in England during the month of November 2009, the autumnal peak of the influenza A[H1N1]pdm09 pandemic. The aim was to quantify the pharmaceutical response to the pandemic and compare this to drug use during the late pandemic (March 2010) and the inter-pandemic periods (May 2011). A large and small wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were sampled in November 2009 to understand the differential fate of the analytes in the two WWTPs prior to their entry in the receiving river and to estimate drug users using a wastewater epidemiology approach. Mean hourly OC concentrations in the small and large WWTP's influent were 208 and 350 ng/L (max, 2070 and 550 ng/L, respectively). Erythromycin was the most concentrated antibiotic measured in Benson and Oxford WWTPs influent (max = 6,870 and 2,930 ng/L, respectively). Napthazoline and oxymetazoline were the most frequently detected and concentrated decongestant in the Benson WWTP influent (1650 and 67 ng/L) and effluent (696 and 307 ng/L), respectively, but were below detection in the Oxford WWTP. OC was found in 73% of November 2009's weekly river samples (max = 193 ng/L), but only in 5% and 0% of the late-and inter-pandemic river samples, respectively. The mean river concentration of each antibiotic during the pandemic largely fell between 17-74 ng/L, with clarithromycin (max = 292 ng/L) and erythromycin (max = 448 ng/L) yielding the highest single measure. In general, the concentration and frequency of detecting antibiotics in the river increased during the pandemic. OC was uniquely well-suited for the wastewater epidemiology approach owing to its nature as a prodrug, recalcitrance and temporally-and spatially-resolved prescription statistics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public library science, 2014
National Category
Chemical Sciences Water Treatment Environmental Sciences Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96793 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0108621 (DOI)000344862300098 ()
Available from: 2014-12-03 Created: 2014-12-03 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, R. H., Östman, M., Olofsson, U., Grabic, R. & Fick, J. (2014). Occurrence and behaviour of 105 active pharmaceutical ingredients in sewage waters of a municipal sewer collection system. Water Research, 58, 221-229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence and behaviour of 105 active pharmaceutical ingredients in sewage waters of a municipal sewer collection system
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2014 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 58, p. 221-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concentrations and behaviour of 105 different active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the aqueous phase of sewage water within a municipal sewer collection system have been investigated. Sewage water samples were gathered from seven pump stations (one of which was located within a university hospital) and from sewage water treatment influent and effluent. The targeted APIs were quantified using a multi-residue method based on online solid phase extraction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The method was thoroughly validated and complies with EU regulations on sample handling, limits of quantification, quality control and selectivity. 51 APIs, including antibiotics, antidepressants, hypertension drugs, analgesics, NSAIDs and psycholeptics, were found frequently within the sewer collection system. API concentrations and mass flows were evaluated in terms of their frequency of detection, daily variation, median/minimum/maximum/average concentrations, demographic dissimilarities, removal efficiencies, and mass flow profiles relative to municipal sales data. Our results suggest that some APIs are removed from, or introduced to, the aqueous phase of sewage waters within the studied municipal collection system.

Keywords
Active pharmaceutical ingredients, Municipal sewage waters, Online SPE-LC-MS/MS, Behaviour, Mass flows
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91138 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2014.03.076 (DOI)000337261500022 ()
Available from: 2014-07-17 Created: 2014-07-15 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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