umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Forman, Helen
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Forman, H. (2015). Events and children's sense of time: a perspective on the origins of everyday time-keeping. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, Article ID 259.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Events and children's sense of time: a perspective on the origins of everyday time-keeping
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article I discuss abstract or pure time versus the content of time, (i.e., events, activities, and other goings-on). Or, more specifically, the utility of these two sorts of time in time-keeping or temporal organization. It is often assumed that abstract, uniform, and objective time is a universal physical entity out there, which humans may perceive of. However, this sort of evenly flowing time was only recently introduced to the human community, together with the mechanical clock. Before the introduction of mechanical clock-time, there were only events available to denote the extent of time. Events defined time, unlike the way time may define events in our present day culture. It is therefore conceivable that our primeval or natural mode of time keeping involves the perception, estimation, and coordination of events. I find it likely that events continues to subserve our sense of time and time-keeping efforts, especially for children who have not yet mastered the use of clock time. Instead of seeing events as a distraction to our perception of time, I suggest that our experience and understanding of time emerges from our perception of events.

Keywords
sense of time, time-keeping, temporal organization, event knowledge, events, time perception, event rception, children
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102452 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00259 (DOI)000350791200001 ()25814969 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-26 Created: 2015-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Carelli, M. G. & Forman, H. (2011). Representation of multiple durations in children and adults. Child Development Research, 907601
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Representation of multiple durations in children and adults
2011 (English)In: Child Development Research, ISSN 2090-3987, p. 907601-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Keeping track of durations of multiple event attributes with different on set and offset times is a challenging task for both children and adults. In this study, children between 5 and 15 years and young adults observed a puppet show in which three puppets appeared on the scene during overlapping intervals of 30 s to 90 s. At test, participants completed a conventional time estimation task and a timeline task in which they reconstructed the temporal pattern by drawing a timeline for each puppet. For all age groups, the timeline task produced more accurate duration judgments than the time estimation task. Preschoolers’ time estimation was at chance level, but their timeline performance was surprisingly good and age differences were eliminated in some task conditions.

These findings suggest that the timeline procedure provides an efficient retrieval support for complex temporal events and that even preschool-aged children are able to represent multiple asynchronous durations, possibly by relying on relational event knowledge in combination with visuospatial retrieval support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2011
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51522 (URN)10.1155/2011/907601 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-01-25 Created: 2012-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Forman, H., Mäntylä, T. & Carelli, M. G. (2011). Time keeping and working memory development in early adolescence: A 4-year follow-up. Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), 108(1), 170-179
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time keeping and working memory development in early adolescence: A 4-year follow-up
2011 (English)In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 170-179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this longitudinal study, we examined time keeping in relation to working memory (WM) development. School-aged children completed two tasks of WM updating and a time monitoring task in which they indicated the passing of time every 5min while watching a film. Children completed these tasks first when they were 8 to 12years old and then 4years later when they were 12 to 16years old. Time keeping in early adolescence showed a different pattern of outcome measures than 4years earlier, with reduced clock checking and increased timing error. However, relative changes in WM development moderated these adverse effects. Adolescents with greater relative gains in WM development were better calibrated than participants with less developing WM functions. We discuss these findings in relation to individual and developmental differences in executive control functions and socioemotionally driven reward seeking.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
Keywords
adolescents, socioemotional development, decision making, time monitoring, working memory, metacognition, executive control, time cognition/perception
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37164 (URN)10.1016/j.jecp.2010.07.004 (DOI)
Note
Available online 21 August 2010Available from: 2010-10-21 Created: 2010-10-21 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Carelli, M. G., Forman, H. & Mäntylä, T. (2008). Sense of time and executive functioning in children and adults. Child Neuropsychology, 14(4), 372-386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sense of time and executive functioning in children and adults
2008 (English)In: Child Neuropsychology, ISSN 0929-7049, E-ISSN 1744-4136, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 372-386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A number of patient studies suggest that impairments in frontal lobe functions are associated with disorders in temporal information processing. One implication of these findings is that subjective experience of time should be related to executive functions regardless of etiology. In two experiments, we examined sense of time in relation to components of executive functioning in healthy children and adults. In Experiment 1, children between 8 to 12 years completed six experimental tasks that tapped three components of executive functioning: inhibition, updating, and mental shifting. Sense of time was examined in a duration judgment task in which participants reproduced stimulus durations between 4 to 32 s. In Experiment 2, adult participants completed the time reproduction task under varying concurrent task demands. Both experiments showed selective effects in that time reproduction errors were related to the inhibition and updating, but not to the shifting, components of executive functioning. However, the observed effects were modulated by task demands and age-related differences in cognitive competence. We conclude that individual differences in executive functioning are only weakly related to time reproduction performance in healthy children and adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Psychology Press, Taylor and Francis Group, 2008
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-18955 (URN)10.1080/09297040701441411 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-03-02 Created: 2009-03-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Mäntylä, T., Carelli, G. & Forman, H. (2007). Time monitoring and executive functioning in children and adults. Journal of ExperimantalChild Psychology (96), 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time monitoring and executive functioning in children and adults
2007 (English)In: Journal of ExperimantalChild Psychology, ISSN 0022-0965, no 96, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Executive functioning, Time monitoring, Prospective memory, Updating, Inhibition, Mental shifting, School-age children, Young adults
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-17609 (URN)doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2006.08.003 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-01-23 Created: 2008-01-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications