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Zamaratskaia, G., Mhd Omar, N. A., Brunius, C., Hallmans, G., Johansson, J.-E., Andersson, S.-O., . . . Landberg, R. (2019). Consumption of whole grain/bran rye instead of refined wheat decrease concentrations of TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin in an exploratory study in men with prostate cancer. Clinical Nutrition, Article ID S0261-5614(19)30009-3.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumption of whole grain/bran rye instead of refined wheat decrease concentrations of TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin in an exploratory study in men with prostate cancer
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2019 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, article id S0261-5614(19)30009-3Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Rye consumption has shown beneficial effects on prostate cancer tumors, as indicated by slower initial tumor growth in animal models and lowering of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in humans. This study evaluated the effects of whole grain/bran rye consumption on low-grade inflammation and endothelial function biomarkers in men with prostate cancer.

METHODS: Seventeen men with untreated, low-grade prostate cancer consumed 485 g rye whole grain and bran products (RP) per day or refined wheat products with added cellulose (WP) in a randomized crossover design. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of treatment.

RESULTS: Concentrations of tumor nuclear factor-receptor 2 (TNF-R2), e-selectin, and endostatin were significantly lower after consumption of the RP diet compared with WP (p < 0.05). Cathepsin S concentration was positively correlated to TNF-R2 and endostatin concentrations across all occasions. Strong correlations were consistently found between intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and between interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA). No effect of intervention was found in 92 inflammation-related protein biomarkers measured in a proximity extension assay.

CONCLUSIONS: RP diet lowered TNF-R2, e-selectin, and endostatin, compared with WP in men with prostate cancer. These effects were accompanied by a reduction in PSA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Endothelial function markers, Low-grade inflammatory markers, Plasma, Prostate cancer, Refined wheat, Whole grain/bran rye
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156369 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2019.01.007 (DOI)30685298 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-13 Created: 2019-02-13 Last updated: 2019-02-27
Berggrund, M., Enroth, S., Lundberg, M., Assarsson, E., Stålberg, K., Lindquist, D., . . . Gyllensten, U. (2019). Identification of candidate plasma protein biomarkers for cervical cancer using the multiplex proximity extension assay. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, Article ID mcp.RA118.001208.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of candidate plasma protein biomarkers for cervical cancer using the multiplex proximity extension assay
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2019 (English)In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, article id mcp.RA118.001208Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is recommended as the primary test in cervical cancer screening, with co-testing by cytology for HPV-positive women to identify cervical lesions. Cytology has low sensitivity and there is a need to identify biomarkers that could identify dysplasia that are likely to progress to cancer. We searched for plasma proteins that could identify women with cervical cancer using the multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA). The abundance of 100 proteins were measured in plasma collected at the time of diagnosis of patients with invasive cervical cancer and in population controls using the Olink Multiplex panels CVD II, INF I, and ONC II. Eighty proteins showed increased levels in cases compared to controls. We identified a signature of 11 proteins (PTX3, ITGB1BP2, AXIN1, STAMPB, SRC, SIRT2, 4E-BP1, PAPPA, HB-EGF, NEMO and IL27) that distinguished cases and controls with a sensitivity of 0.96 at a specificity of 1.0. This signature was evaluated in a prospective replication cohort with samples collected before, at or after diagnosis and achieved a sensitivity of 0.78 and a specificity 0.56 separating samples collected at the time of diagnosis of invasive cancer from samples collected prior to diagnosis. No difference in abundance was seen between samples collected prior to diagnosis or after treatment as compared to population controls, indicating that this protein signature is mainly informative close to time of diagnosis. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal window in time prior to diagnosis for these biomarker candidates.

Keywords
Blood*, Cancer biomarker(s), Cervical cancer, Clinical proteomics, Human Papillomavirus, Personalized medicine, Screening
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156660 (URN)10.1074/mcp.RA118.001208 (DOI)30692274 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-02-27
Erzurumluoglu, A. M., Liu, M., Jackson, V. E., Barnes, D. R., Datta, G., Melbourne, C. A., . . . Howson, J. M. (2019). Meta-analysis of up to 622,409 individuals identifies 40 novel smoking behaviour associated genetic loci. Molecular Psychiatry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meta-analysis of up to 622,409 individuals identifies 40 novel smoking behaviour associated genetic loci
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2019 (English)In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Smoking is a major heritable and modifiable risk factor for many diseases, including cancer, common respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Fourteen genetic loci have previously been associated with smoking behaviour-related traits. We tested up to 235,116 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) on the exome-array for association with smoking initiation, cigarettes per day, pack-years, and smoking cessation in a fixed effects meta-analysis of up to 61 studies (up to 346,813 participants). In a subset of 112,811 participants, a further one million SNVs were also genotyped and tested for association with the four smoking behaviour traits. SNV-trait associations with P < 5 × 10-8 in either analysis were taken forward for replication in up to 275,596 independent participants from UK Biobank. Lastly, a meta-analysis of the discovery and replication studies was performed. Sixteen SNVs were associated with at least one of the smoking behaviour traits (P < 5 × 10-8) in the discovery samples. Ten novel SNVs, including rs12616219 near TMEM182, were followed-up and five of them (rs462779 in REV3L, rs12780116 in CNNM2, rs1190736 in GPR101, rs11539157 in PJA1, and rs12616219 near TMEM182) replicated at a Bonferroni significance threshold (P < 4.5 × 10-3) with consistent direction of effect. A further 35 SNVs were associated with smoking behaviour traits in the discovery plus replication meta-analysis (up to 622,409 participants) including a rare SNV, rs150493199, in CCDC141 and two low-frequency SNVs in CEP350 and HDGFRP2. Functional follow-up implied that decreased expression of REV3L may lower the probability of smoking initiation. The novel loci will facilitate understanding the genetic aetiology of smoking behaviour and may lead to the identification of potential drug targets for smoking prevention and/or cessation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156372 (URN)10.1038/s41380-018-0313-0 (DOI)30617275 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-13 Created: 2019-02-13 Last updated: 2019-02-27
Gylling, B., Myte, R., Ulvik, A., Ueland, P. M., Midttun, Ø., Schneede, J., . . . Palmqvist, R. (2019). One-carbon metabolite ratios as functional B-vitamin markers and in relation to colorectal cancer risk. International Journal of Cancer, 144(5), 947-956
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-carbon metabolite ratios as functional B-vitamin markers and in relation to colorectal cancer risk
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 5, p. 68p. 947-956Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: One-carbon metabolism biomarker are easily measured in plasma, but analyzing them one at a time in relation to disease does not take into account the interdependence of the many factors involved. The relative dynamics of major one-carbon metabolism branches can be assessed by relating the functional B-vitamin marker total homocysteine (tHcy) to transsulfuration (total cysteine) and methylation (creatinine) outputs.

Objective: We validated the ratios of tHcy to total cysteine (Hcy:Cys), tHcy to creatinine (Hcy:Cre), and tHcy to cysteine to creatinine (Hcy:Cys:Cre) as functional markers of B-vitamin status. We also calculated the associations of these ratios to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.

Design: The relative contribution of potential confounders to the variance of the ratio-based B-vitamin markers was calculated by linear regression in a nested case-control study of 613 CRC cases and 1211 matched controls. Total B-vitamin status was represented by a summary score comprising Z-standardized plasma concentrations of folate, cobalamin, betaine, pyridoxal 5´-phosphate, and riboflavin. Associations with CRC risk were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

Results: The ratio-based B-vitamin markers all outperformed tHcy as markers of total B-vitamin status, in both CRC cases and controls. Associations with CRC risk were similar for the ratio-based B-vitamin markers and total B-vitamin status (approximately 25% lower risk for high versus low B-vitamin status).

Conclusions: Ratio-based B-vitamin markers were good predictors of total B-vitamin status, and displayed similar associations with CRC risk. Since tHcy and creatinine are routinely clinically analyzed, Hcy:Cre could be easily implemented in clinical practice to aid interpretation of tHcy results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019. p. 68
Keywords
Biomarkers, colorectal cancer, metabolite ratios, B-vitamins, one-carbon metabolism
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Cancer Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142854 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31606 (DOI)000455041700003 ()29786139 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 12/501Swedish Cancer Society, 14/780
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form

Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Ge, W., Clendenen, T. V., Afanasyeva, Y., Koenig, K. L., Agnoli, C., Brinton, L. A., . . . Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A. (2018). Circulating anti-Müllerian hormone and breast cancer risk: a study in ten prospective cohorts. International Journal of Cancer, 142(11), 2215-2226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating anti-Müllerian hormone and breast cancer risk: a study in ten prospective cohorts
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 142, no 11, p. 2215-2226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A strong positive association has been observed between circulating anti‐Müllerian hormone (AMH), a biomarker of ovarian reserve, and breast cancer risk in three prospective studies. Confirming this association is important because of the paucity of biomarkers of breast cancer risk in premenopausal women. We conducted a consortium study including ten prospective cohorts that had collected blood from premenopausal women. A nested case–control design was implemented within each cohort. A total of 2,835 invasive (80%) and in situ (20%) breast cancer cases were individually matched to controls (n = 3,122) on age at blood donation. AMH was measured using a high sensitivity enzyme‐linked immunoabsorbent assay. Conditional logistic regression was applied to the aggregated dataset. There was a statistically significant trend of increasing breast cancer risk with increasing AMH concentration (ptrend across quartiles <0.0001) after adjusting for breast cancer risk factors. The odds ratio (OR) for breast cancer in the top vs. bottom quartile of AMH was 1.60 (95% CI = 1.31–1.94). Though the test for interaction was not statistically significant (pinteraction = 0.15), the trend was statistically significant only for tumors positive for both estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR): ER+/PR+: ORQ4–Q1 = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.46–2.64, ptrend <0.0001; ER+/PR−: ORQ4–Q1 = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.40–1.68, ptrend = 0.51; ER−/PR+: ORQ4–Q1 = 3.23, 95% CI = 0.48–21.9, ptrend = 0.26; ER−/PR−: ORQ4–Q1 = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.63–2.09, ptrend = 0.60. The association was observed for both pre‐ (ORQ4–Q1= 1.35, 95% CI = 1.05–1.73) and post‐menopausal (ORQ4–Q1 = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.03–2.53) breast cancer (pinteraction = 0.34). In this large consortium study, we confirmed that AMH is associated with breast cancer risk, with a 60% increase in risk for women in the top vs. bottom quartile of AMH.

What's new? To make informed decisions about screening and prevention, women need tools to accurately assess their breast cancer risk. Young women have few predictive biomarkers to look to; estrogen and progesterone are only weakly predictive before menopause. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), which strongly correlates with age at menopause, may also correlate with breast cancer risk, according to some previous data. Here, the authors test this correlation by conducting nested case-control studies within ten different cohorts. They found that breast cancer risk increased along with increasing AMH concentration, confirming this hormone as a possible biomarker for breast cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
AMH, anti-Müllerian hormone, breast cancer, nested case-control study
National Category
Surgery Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146526 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31249 (DOI)000429545800003 ()29315564 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Li, W., Middha, M., Bicak, M., Sjoberg, D. D., Vertosick, E., Dahlin, A., . . . Klein, R. J. (2018). Genome-wide Scan Identifies Role for AOX1 in Prostate Cancer Survival. European Urology, 74(6), 710-719
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-wide Scan Identifies Role for AOX1 in Prostate Cancer Survival
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2018 (English)In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 710-719Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer have low-risk cancers. How to predict prostate cancer progression at the time of diagnosis remains challenging.

Objective: To identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with death from prostate cancer.

Design, setting, and participants: Blood samples from 11 506 men in Sweden were collected during 1991–1996. Of these, 1053 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer and 245 died from the disease. Stage and grade at diagnosis and outcome information were obtained, and DNA from all cases was genotyped.

Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: A total of 6 126 633 SNPs were tested for association with prostate-cancer-specific survival time using a Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for age, stage, and grade at diagnosis. A value of 1 × 10−6 was used as suggestive significance threshold. Positive candidate SNPs were tested for association with gene expression using expression quantitative trait locus analysis.

Results and limitations: We found 12 SNPs at seven independent loci associated with prostate-cancer-specific survival time. One of 6 126 633 SNPs tested reached genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10−8) and replicated in an independent cohort: rs73055188 (p = 5.27 × 10−9, per-allele hazard ratio [HR] = 2.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.72–2.98) in the AOX1 gene. A second SNP reached a suggestive level of significance (p < 1 × 10−6) and replicated in an independent cohort: rs2702185 (p = 7.1 × 10−7, per-allele HR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.76–3.69) in the SMG7 gene. The SNP rs73055188 is correlated with AOX1 expression levels, which is associated with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer in independent cohorts. This association is yet to be validated in other ethnic groups.

Conclusions: The SNP rs73055188 at the AOX1 locus is associated with prostate-cancer-specific survival time, and AOX1 gene expression level is correlated with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer.

Patient summary: We identify two genetic markers that are associated with prostate-cancer-specific survival time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
AOX1, Expression quantitative trait locus, Genome-wide association study, Prostate cancer, Survival analysis
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154930 (URN)10.1016/j.eururo.2018.06.021 (DOI)000450121100014 ()30289108 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2017/559Swedish Research Council, 2016-02974
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Lövheim, H., Olsson, J., Weidung, B., Johansson, A., Eriksson, S., Hallmans, G. & Elgh, F. (2018). Interaction between Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Associated with the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease Development. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 61, 939-945
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction between Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Associated with the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease Development
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 61, p. 939-945Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Several environmental factors, including infectious agents, have been suggested to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been associated with AD in several recent studies.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether carriage of CMV, alone or in combination with Herpes simplex virus (HSV), increased the risk of developing AD.

METHODS: Plasma samples from 360 AD cases (75.3% women, mean age 61.2 years), taken an average of 9.6 years before AD diagnosis, and 360 age-, sex-, cohort-, and sampling date matched dementia-free controls were analyzed to detect anti-CMV (immunoglobulin [Ig] G and IgM), group-specific anti-HSV (IgG and IgM), and specific anti-HSV1 and HSV2 IgG antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. AD cases and dementia-free controls were compared using conditional logistic regression analyses.

RESULTS: The presence of anti-CMV IgG antibodies did not increase the risk of AD (odds ratio [OR], 0.857; p = 0.497). Among AD cases, an association between CMV and HSV1 carriage was detected (OR 7.145, p < 0.001); in a conditional logistic regression model, the interaction between CMV and HSV1 was associated with AD development (OR 5.662; p = 0.007).

CONCLUSION: The present findings do not support a direct relationship between CMV infection and the development of AD; however, an interaction between CMV and HSV1 was found to be associated significantly with AD development. These findings suggest that CMV infection facilitates the development of HSV1-associated AD, possibly via its effects on the immune system.

Keywords
Alzheimer’s disease, Herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, dementia, nested case-control study
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143394 (URN)10.3233/JAD-161305 (DOI)000422845200010 ()29254081 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-26 Created: 2018-01-26 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Feitosa, M. F., Kraja, A. T., Chasman, D. I., Sung, Y. J., Winkler, T. W., Ntalla, I., . . . Levy, D. (2018). Novel genetic associations for blood pressure identified via gene-alcohol interaction in up to 570K individuals across multiple ancestries. PLoS ONE, 13(6), Article ID e0198166.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel genetic associations for blood pressure identified via gene-alcohol interaction in up to 570K individuals across multiple ancestries
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e0198166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for hypertension; the mechanism by which alcohol consumption impact blood pressure (BP) regulation remains unknown. We hypothesized that a genome-wide association study accounting for gene-alcohol consumption interaction for BP might identify additional BP loci and contribute to the understanding of alcohol-related BP regulation. We conducted a large two-stage investigation incorporating joint testing of main genetic effects and single nucleotide variant (SNV)-alcohol consumption interactions. In Stage 1, genome-wide discovery meta-analyses in approximate to 131 K individuals across several ancestry groups yielded 3,514 SNVs (245 loci) with suggestive evidence of association (P <1.0 x 10(-5)). In Stage 2, these SNVs were tested for independent external replication in individuals across multiple ancestries. We identified and replicated (at Bonferroni correction threshold) five novel BP loci (380 SNVs in 21 genes) and 49 previously reported BP loci (2,159 SNVs in 109 genes) in European ancestry, and in multi-ancestry meta-analyses (P < 5.0 x 10(-8)). For African ancestry samples, we detected 18 potentially novel BP loci (P< 5.0 x 10(-8)) in Stage 1 that warrant further replication. Additionally, correlated meta-analysis identified eight novel BP loci (11 genes). Several genes in these loci (e.g., PINX1, GATA4, BLK, FTO and GABBR2 have been previously reported to be associated with alcohol consumption. These findings provide insights into the role of alcohol consumption in the genetic architecture of hypertension.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public library science, 2018
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Medical Genetics Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150780 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0198166 (DOI)000435528600017 ()29912962 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Myte, R., Gylling, B., Häggström, J., Schneede, J., Löfgren-Burström, A., Huyghe, J. R., . . . Van Guelpen, B. (2018). One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and genetic variants in relation to colorectal cancer risk by KRAS and BRAF mutation status. PLoS ONE, 13(4), Article ID e0196233.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and genetic variants in relation to colorectal cancer risk by KRAS and BRAF mutation status
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0196233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, intracellular reactions involved in nucleotide synthesis and methylation, likely increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, results have been inconsistent. To explore whether this inconsistency could be explained by intertumoral heterogeneity, we evaluated a comprehensive panel of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to the risk of molecular subtypes of CRC defined by mutations in the KRAS and BRAF oncogenes. This nested case-control study included 488 CRC cases and 947 matched controls from two population-based cohorts in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. We analyzed 14 biomarkers and 17 SNPs in prediagnostic blood and determined KRAS and BRAF mutation status in tumor tissue. In a multivariate network analysis, no variable displayed a strong association with the risk of specific CRC subtypes. A non-synonymous SNP in the CTH gene, rs1021737, had a stronger association compared with other variables. In subsequent univariate analyses, participants with variant rs1021737 genotype had a decreased risk of KRAS-mutated CRC (OR per allele = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.50, 1.05), and an increased risk of BRAF-mutated CRC (OR per allele = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.07, 2.30), with weak evidence for heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity = 0.01). This subtype-specific SNP association was not replicated in a case-case analysis of 533 CRC cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (P = 0.85). In conclusion, we found no support for clear subtype-specific roles of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and SNPs in CRC development, making differences in CRC molecular subtype distributions an unlikely explanation for the varying results on the role of one-carbon metabolism in CRC development across previous studies. Further investigation of the CTH gene in colorectal carcinogenesis with regards to KRAS and BRAF mutations or other molecular characteristics of the tumor may be warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147822 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0196233 (DOI)000430802400077 ()29694444 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-21 Created: 2018-05-21 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Vermeulen, R., Saberi Hosnijeh, F., Bodinier, B., Portengen, L., Liquet, B., Garrido-Manriquez, J., . . . Liao, S.-F. (2018). Pre-diagnostic blood immune markers, incidence and progression of B-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma: univariate and functionally informed multivariate analyses. International Journal of Cancer, 143(6), 1335-1347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-diagnostic blood immune markers, incidence and progression of B-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma: univariate and functionally informed multivariate analyses
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 6, p. 1335-1347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent prospective studies have shown that dysregulation of the immune system may precede the development of B‐cell lymphomas (BCL) in immunocompetent individuals. However, to date, the studies were restricted to a few immune markers, which were considered separately. Using a nested case–control study within two European prospective cohorts, we measured plasma levels of 28 immune markers in samples collected a median of 6 years before diagnosis (range 2.01–15.97) in 268 incident cases of BCL (including multiple myeloma [MM]) and matched controls. Linear mixed models and partial least square analyses were used to analyze the association between levels of immune marker and the incidence of BCL and its main histological subtypes and to investigate potential biomarkers predictive of the time to diagnosis. Linear mixed model analyses identified associations linking lower levels of fibroblast growth factor‐2 (FGF‐2 p = 7.2 × 10−4) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF‐α, p = 6.5 × 10−5) and BCL incidence. Analyses stratified by histological subtypes identified inverse associations for MM subtype including FGF‐2 (p = 7.8 × 10−7), TGF‐α (p = 4.08 × 10−5), fractalkine (p = 1.12 × 10−3), monocyte chemotactic protein‐3 (p = 1.36 × 10−4), macrophage inflammatory protein 1‐alpha (p = 4.6 × 10−4) and vascular endothelial growth factor (p = 4.23 × 10−5). Our results also provided marginal support for already reported associations between chemokines and diffuse large BCL (DLBCL) and cytokines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Case‐only analyses showed that Granulocyte‐macrophage colony stimulating factor levels were consistently higher closer to diagnosis, which provides further evidence of its role in tumor progression. In conclusion, our study suggests a role of growth‐factors in the incidence of MM and of chemokine and cytokine regulation in DLBCL and CLL.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
cytokine, lymphoma, mixed-effect modeling, multiple myeloma, multivariate models, prospective cohort, time to diagnosis
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147948 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31536 (DOI)000441128700007 ()29667176 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-23 Created: 2018-05-23 Last updated: 2018-09-13Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9581-3845

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