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Gallampois, Christine
Alternative names
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Blum, K. M., Gallampois, C., Andersson, P. L., Renman, G., Renman, A. & Haglund, P. (2019). Comprehensive assessment of organic contaminant removal from on-site sewage treatment facility effluent by char-fortified filter beds. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 361, 111-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comprehensive assessment of organic contaminant removal from on-site sewage treatment facility effluent by char-fortified filter beds
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 361, p. 111-122Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The removal of organic contaminants from wastewater using cost-efficient and easily accessible methods have been increasingly studied in recent years. Most studies have focused on municipal sewage treatment plants; however, our study investigated treatment with char-fortified filter beds for on-site sewage treatment facilities (OSSFs). OSSFs are commonly used in rural and semi-urban areas all over the world to treat wastewater to reduce eutrophication and water-related diseases. To screen for a wide range of organic contaminants in order to improve the understanding of wastewater treatment efficiency and molecular properties, samples were taken from an OSSF field study site that used three filter types: sand, char-fortified sand, and char-fortified gas concrete. First, we screened for organic contaminants with state-of-the-art gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based targeted and untargeted analysis and then we developed quantitative structure-property relationship models to find the key molecular features responsible for the removal of organic contaminants. We identified 74 compounds, of which 24 were confirmed with reference standards. Amongst these 74 compounds were plasticizers, UV stabilizers, fragrances, pesticides, surfactant and polymer impurities, pharmaceuticals and their metabolites, and many biogenic compounds. Sand filters that are sometimes used as a last treatment step in OSSFs can remove hydrophobic contaminants. The addition of biochar significantly increases the removal of these and a few hydrophilic compounds (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, α = 0.05). Gas concrete did not appear to be suitable for the removal of organic contaminants. This study showed that, besides hydrophobic effects, biodegradation is the most important removal pathway in long-term field applications. However, further improvements are necessary to remove very hydrophilic contaminants as they were not removed with sand and biochar-fortified sand.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Screening, decentralized wastewater treatment systems, GC×GC-HRMS, LC IM HRMS, biochar, quantitative structure-property relationship
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-144261 (URN)10.1016/j.jhazmat.2018.08.009 (DOI)000449125800013 ()30176409 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 216-2012-2101
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Liem-Nguyen, V., Huynh, K., Gallampois, C. & Björn, E. (2019). Determination of picomolar concentrations of thiol compounds in natural waters and biological samples by tandem mass spectrometry with online preconcentration and isotope-labeling derivatization. Analytica Chimica Acta, 1067, 71-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Determination of picomolar concentrations of thiol compounds in natural waters and biological samples by tandem mass spectrometry with online preconcentration and isotope-labeling derivatization
2019 (English)In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 1067, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a sensitive, selective and robust method for the determination of 14 thiol compounds in aqueous samples. Thiols were derivatized with omega-bromoacetonylquinolinium bromide (BQB) and its deuterium labeled equivalent D7-ω-bromoacetonylquinolinium bromide (D7). Derivatized thiols were preconcentrated by online solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography separation and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry determination (SPE/LC-ESI-MS/MS). The robustness of the method was validated for wide ranges in pH, salinity, and concentrations of sulfide and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to cover contrasting natural water types. The limits of detection (LODs) for the thiols were 3.1-66 pM. Between 6 and 14 of the thiols were detected in different natural sample types at variable concentrations: boreal wetland porewater (0.7-51 nM), estuarine sediment porewater (50 pM-11 nM), coastal sea water (60 pM-16 nM), and sulfate reducing bacterium cultures (80 pM-4 nM). MS/MS fragmentation of the compounds produces two pairs of common product ions, m/z 130.2/137.1 and 218.1/225.1, which enables scanning for unknown thiols in precursor ion scan mode. Using this approach, we identified cysteine, mercaptoacetic acid, N-acetyl-L-cysteine and sulfurothioic S-acid in boreal wetland porewater. The performance of the developed method sets a new state of the art for the determination of thiol compounds in environmental and biological samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Thiol compounds, Tandem mass spectrometry, On-line preconcentration, Natural waters
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159046 (URN)10.1016/j.aca.2019.03.035 (DOI)000466150300007 ()31047151 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-21 Created: 2019-05-21 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Rostkowski, P., Haglund, P., Aalizadeh, R., Alygizakis, N., Thomaidis, N., Beltran Arandes, J., . . . Yang, C. (2019). The strength in numbers: comprehensive characterization of house dust using complementary mass spectrometric techniques. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 411(10), 1957-1977
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The strength in numbers: comprehensive characterization of house dust using complementary mass spectrometric techniques
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2019 (English)In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 411, no 10, p. 1957-1977Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Untargeted analysis of a composite house dust sample has been performed as part of a collaborative effort to evaluate the progress in the field of suspect and nontarget screening and build an extensive database of organic indoor environment contaminants. Twenty-one participants reported results that were curated by the organizers of the collaborative trial. In total, nearly 2350 compounds were identified (18%) or tentatively identified (25% at confidence level 2 and 58% at confidence level 3), making the collaborative trial a success. However, a relatively small share (37%) of all compounds were reported by more than one participant, which shows that there is plenty of room for improvement in the field of suspect and nontarget screening. An even a smaller share (5%) of the total number of compounds were detected using both liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thus, the two MS techniques are highly complementary. Most of the compounds were detected using LC with electrospray ionization (ESI) MS and comprehensive 2D GC (GCxGC) with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electron ionization (EI), respectively. Collectively, the three techniques accounted for more than 75% of the reported compounds. Glycols, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and various biogenic compounds dominated among the compounds reported by LC-MS participants, while hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon derivatives, and chlorinated paraffins and chlorinated biphenyls were primarily reported by GC-MS participants. Plastics additives, flavor and fragrances, and personal care products were reported by both LC-MS and GC-MS participants. It was concluded that the use of multiple analytical techniques was required for a comprehensive characterization of house dust contaminants. Further, several recommendations are given for improved suspect and nontarget screening of house dust and other indoor environment samples, including the use of open-source data processing tools. One of the tools allowed provisional identification of almost 500 compounds that had not been reported by participants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
House dust, Suspect and nontarget analysis, Collaborative trial, Complementary analytical techniques, Mass spectrometry
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158583 (URN)10.1007/s00216-019-01615-6 (DOI)000464714400004 ()30830245 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062728989 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Massei, R., Hollert, H., Krauss, M., von Tümpling, W., Weidauer, C., Haglund, P., . . . Brack, W. (2019). Toxicity and neurotoxicity profiling of contaminated sediments from Gulf of Bothnia (Sweden): a multi-endpoint assay with Zebrafish embryos. Environmental Sciences Europe, 31, Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toxicity and neurotoxicity profiling of contaminated sediments from Gulf of Bothnia (Sweden): a multi-endpoint assay with Zebrafish embryos
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2019 (English)In: Environmental Sciences Europe, ISSN 2190-4707, E-ISSN 2190-4715, Vol. 31, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The toxicological characterization of sediments is an essential task to monitor the quality of aquatic environments. Many hazardous pollutants may accumulate in sediments and pose a risk to the aquatic community. The present study provides an attempt to integrate a diagnostic whole mixture assessment workflow based on a slightly modified Danio rerio embryo acute toxicity test with chemical characterization. Danio rerio embryos were directly exposed to sieved sediment (≤ 63 μm) for 96 h. Sediment samples were collected from three polluted sites (Kramfors, Sundsvall and Örnsköldsvik) in the Gulf of Bothnia (Sweden) which are characterized by a long history of pulp and paper industry impact. Effect data were supported by chemical analyses of 237 organic pollutants and 30 trace elements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-156256 (URN)10.1186/s12302-019-0188-y (DOI)000457727700001 ()
Projects
EcoChange
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Rodríguez, J., Gallampois, C., Timonen, S., Andersson, A., Sinkko, H., Haglund, P., . . . Rowe, O. (2018). Effects of Organic Pollutants on Bacterial Communities Under Future Climate Change Scenarios. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9, Article ID 2926.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Organic Pollutants on Bacterial Communities Under Future Climate Change Scenarios
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 2926Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coastal ecosystems are highly dynamic and can be strongly influenced by climate change, anthropogenic activities (e.g. pollution) and a combination of the two pressures. As a result of climate change, the northern hemisphere is predicted to undergo an increased precipitation regime, leading in turn to higher terrestrial runoff and increased river inflow. This increased runoff will transfer terrestrial dissolved organic matter (tDOM) and anthropogenic contaminants to coastal waters. Such changes can directly influence the resident biology, particularly at the base of the food web, and can influence the partitioning of contaminants and thus their potential impact on the food web. Bacteria have been shown to respond to high tDOM concentration and organic pollutants loads, and could represent the entry of some pollutants into coastal food webs. We carried out a mesocosm experiment to determine the effects of: 1) increased tDOM concentration, 2) organic pollutant exposure, and 3) the combined effect of these two factors, on pelagic bacterial communities. This study showed significant responses in bacterial community composition under the three environmental perturbations tested. The addition of tDOM increased bacterial activity and diversity, while the addition of organic pollutants led to an overall reduction of these parameters, particularly under concurrent elevated tDOM concentration. Furthermore, we identified 33 bacterial taxa contributing to the significant differences observed in community composition, as well as 35 bacterial taxa which responded differently to extended exposure to organic pollutants. These findings point to the potential impact of organic pollutants under future climate change conditions on the basal coastal ecosystem, as well as to the potential utility of natural bacterial communities as efficient indicators of environmental disturbance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
bacterial community composition, organic pollutants, dissolved organic matter, climate change, Baltic Sea, metagenomics
National Category
Other Chemistry Topics Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153774 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2018.02926 (DOI)000451904500001 ()30555447 (PubMedID)
Projects
ECOCHANGE
Note

Errata: Rodríguez, J., Gallampois, C. M. J., Timonen, S., Andersson, A., Sinkko, H., Haglund, P., et al. Corrigendum: Effects of Organic Pollutants on Bacterial Communities Under Future Climate Change Scenarios. Front. Microbiol. 2019;10:2388. DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.02388

Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Ripszám, M., Gallampois, C., Berglund, Å., Larsson, H., Andersson, A., Tysklind, M. & Haglund, P. (2015). Effects of predicted climatic changes on distribution of organic contaminants in brackish water mesocosms. Science of the Total Environment, 517(1 June 2015), 10-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of predicted climatic changes on distribution of organic contaminants in brackish water mesocosms
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2015 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 517, no 1 June 2015, p. 10-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Predicted consequences of future climate change in the northern Baltic Sea include increases in sea surface temperatures and terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) runoff. These changes are expected to alter environmental distribution of anthropogenic organic contaminants (OCs). To assess likely shifts in their distributions, outdoor mesocosms were employed to mimic pelagic ecosystems at two temperatures and two DOC concentrations, current: 15 degrees C and 4 mg DOC L-1 and, within ranges of predicted increases, 18 degrees C and 6 mg DOC L-1, respectively. Selected organic contaminants were added to the mesocosms to monitor changes in their distribution induced by the treatments. OC partitioning to particulate matter and sedimentation were enhanced at the higher DOC concentration, at both temperatures, while higher losses and lower partitioning of OCs to DOC were observed at the higher temperature. No combined effects of higher temperature and DOC on partitioning were observed, possibly because of the balancing nature of these processes. Therefore, changes in OCs' fates may largely depend on whether they are most sensitive to temperature or DOC concentration rises. Bromoanilines, phenanthrene, biphenyl and naphthalene were sensitive to the rise in DOC concentration, whereas organophosphates, chlorobenzenes (PCBz) and polychlorinated biphenyls (POs) were more sensitive to temperature. Mitotane and diflufenican were sensitive to both temperature and DOC concentration rises individually, but not in combination. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Climate change, Temperature, Dissolved organic carbon, Organic contaminants, Environmental distribution, Mesocosms
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-103124 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.02.051 (DOI)000352663800002 ()25710621 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-26 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Gallampois, C. M. J., Schymanski, E. L., Bataineh, M., Buchinger, S., Krauss, M., Reifferscheid, G. & Brack, W. (2013). Integrated biological-chemical approach for the isolation and selection of polyaromatic mutagens in surface waters. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 405(28), 9101-9112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated biological-chemical approach for the isolation and selection of polyaromatic mutagens in surface waters
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2013 (English)In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 405, no 28, p. 9101-9112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many environmental mutagens, including polyaromatic compounds are present in surface waters, often in complex mixtures and at low concentrations. The present study provides and applies a novel, integrated approach to isolate polyaromatic mutagens in river water using a sample from the River Elbe. The sample was taken downstream of industrial discharges using blue rayon (BR) as a passive sampler that selectively adsorbs polyaromatic compounds and was subjected to effect-directed fractionation in order to characterise the compounds causing the detected effect(s). The procedure relies on three complementary fractionation steps, the Ames fluctuation assay with strains TA98, YG1024 and YG1041 with and without S9 activation and analytical screening. Several mutagenic fractions were isolated by combining mutagenicity testing with fractionation. The enhanced mutagenicity in the nitroreductase and/or O-acetyltransferase overexpressing strains YG1024 and YG1041 strains suggested amino- and/or nitro-compounds causing mutagenicity in several fractions. Analytical screening of mutagenic fractions with LC-HRMS/MS provided a list of molecular formulas typically containing one to ten nitrogen and at least two oxygen atoms supporting the presence of amino and nitro-compounds in the mutagenic fractions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013
Keywords
Polyaromatic compounds, Blue rayon, Multi-dimensional fractionation, Multi-strains Ames fluctuation assay, Reversed-phase HPLC, Liquid-chromatography-high resolution MS/MS
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-83617 (URN)10.1007/s00216-013-7349-4 (DOI)000326374100015 ()
Available from: 2013-12-05 Created: 2013-12-03 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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