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Gandla, Madhavi Latha
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Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Obudulu, O., Mähler, N., Skotare, T., Bygdell, J., Abreu, I. N., Ahnlund, M., . . . Tuominen, H. (2018). A multi-omics approach reveals function of Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Proteins in wood formation of​ ​​Populus​​ ​trees. BMC Genomics, 19, Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multi-omics approach reveals function of Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Proteins in wood formation of​ ​​Populus​​ ​trees
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2018 (English)In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 19, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Proteins (SCAMPs) are highly conserved 32–38 kDa proteins that are involved in membrane trafficking. A systems approach was taken to elucidate function of SCAMPs in wood formation of Populus trees. Phenotypic and multi-omics analyses were performed in woody tissues of transgenic Populus trees carrying an RNAi construct for Populus tremula x tremuloides SCAMP3 (PttSCAMP3;Potri.019G104000).

Results: The woody tissues of the transgenic trees displayed increased amounts of both polysaccharides and lignin oligomers, indicating increased deposition of both the carbohydrate and lignin components of the secondary cell walls. This coincided with a tendency towards increased wood density as well as significantly increased thickness of the suberized cork in the transgenic lines. Multivariate OnPLS (orthogonal projections to latent structures) modeling of five different omics datasets (the transcriptome, proteome, GC-MS metabolome, LC-MS metabolome and pyrolysis-GC/MS metabolome) collected from the secondary xylem tissues of the stem revealed systemic variation in the different variables in the transgenic lines, including changes that correlated with the changes in the secondary cell wall composition. The OnPLS model also identified a rather large number of proteins that were more abundant in the transgenic lines than in the wild type. Several of these were related to secretion and/or endocytosis as well as both primary and secondary cell wall biosynthesis.

Conclusions: Populus SCAMP proteins were shown to influence accumulation of secondary cell wall components, including polysaccharides and phenolic compounds, in the woody tissues of Populus tree stems. Our multi-omics analyses combined with the OnPLS modelling suggest that this function is mediated by changes in membrane trafficking to fine-tune the abundance of cell wall precursors and/or proteins involved in cell wall biosynthesis and transport. The data provides a multi-level source of information for future studies on the function of the SCAMP proteins in plant stem tissues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2018
Keywords
Secretory Carrier-Associated Membrane Protein (SCAMP), Populus, Wood chemistry, Wood density, Biomass, Bioprocessing, Cork, Multi-omics
National Category
Cell Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143890 (URN)10.1186/s12864-017-4411-1 (DOI)000419232000004 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 232-2009-1698
Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Gandla, M. L., Martin, C. & Jönsson, L. J. (2018). Analytical Enzymatic Saccharification of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Conversion to Biofuels and Bio-Based Chemicals. Energies, 11(11), Article ID 2936.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analytical Enzymatic Saccharification of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Conversion to Biofuels and Bio-Based Chemicals
2018 (English)In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 2936Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lignocellulosic feedstocks are an important resource for biorefining of renewables to bio-based fuels, chemicals, and materials. Relevant feedstocks include energy crops, residues from agriculture and forestry, and agro-industrial and forest-industrial residues. The feedstocks differ with respect to their recalcitrance to bioconversion through pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification, which will produce sugars that can be further converted to advanced biofuels and other products through microbial fermentation processes. In analytical enzymatic saccharification, the susceptibility of lignocellulosic samples to pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification is assessed in analytical scale using high-throughput or semi-automated techniques. This type of analysis is particularly relevant for screening of large collections of natural or transgenic varieties of plants that are dedicated to production of biofuels or other bio-based chemicals. In combination with studies of plant physiology and cell wall chemistry, analytical enzymatic saccharification can provide information about the fundamental reasons behind lignocellulose recalcitrance as well as about the potential of collections of plants or different fractions of plants for industrial biorefining. This review is focused on techniques used by researchers for screening the susceptibility of plants to pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification, and advantages and disadvantages that are associated with different approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
lignocellulose, biomass, biofuel, sugar platform, pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, cellulose, analytical scale, high-throughput screening
National Category
Energy Systems Bioenergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154970 (URN)10.3390/en11112936 (DOI)000451814000074 ()
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Donev, E., Gandla, M. L., Jönsson, L. J. & Mellerowicz, E. J. (2018). Engineering non-cellulosic polysaccharides of wood for the biorefinery. Frontiers in Plant Science, 9, Article ID 1537.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Engineering non-cellulosic polysaccharides of wood for the biorefinery
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 9, article id 1537Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Non-cellulosic polysaccharides constitute approximately one third of usable woody biomass for human exploitation. In contrast to cellulose, these substances are composed of several different types of unit monosaccharides and their backbones are substituted by various groups. Their structural diversity and recent examples of their modification in transgenic plants and mutants suggest they can be targeted for improving wood-processing properties, thereby facilitating conversion of wood in a biorefinery setting. Critical knowledge on their structure-function relationship is slowly emerging, although our understanding of molecular interactions responsible for observed phenomena is still incomplete. This review: (1) provides an overview of structural features of major non-cellulosic polysaccharides of wood, (2) describes the fate of non-cellulosic polysaccharides during biorefinery processing, (3) shows how the non-cellulosic polysaccharides impact lignocellulose processing focused on yields of either sugars or polymers, and (4) discusses outlooks for the improvement of tree species for biorefinery by modifying the structure of non-cellulosic polysaccharides.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
non-cellulosic polysaccharides, woody biomass, secondary cell wall, hemicellulose, pectin, galactan, tree genetic improvement, wood biorefining
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153703 (URN)10.3389/fpls.2018.01537 (DOI)000447980100003 ()30405672 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Energy AgencyBio4Energy
Available from: 2018-12-05 Created: 2018-12-05 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Escamez, S., Latha Gandla, M., Derba-Maceluch, M., Lundqvist, S.-O., Mellerowicz, E. J., Jönsson, L. J. & Tuominen, H. (2017). A collection of genetically engineered Populus trees reveals wood biomass traits that predict glucose yield from enzymatic hydrolysis. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 15798.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A collection of genetically engineered Populus trees reveals wood biomass traits that predict glucose yield from enzymatic hydrolysis
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 15798Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wood represents a promising source of sugars to produce bio-based renewables, including biofuels. However, breaking down lignocellulose requires costly pretreatments because lignocellulose is recalcitrant to enzymatic saccharification. Increasing saccharification potential would greatly contribute to make wood a competitive alternative to petroleum, but this requires improving wood properties. To identify wood biomass traits associated with saccharification, we analyzed a total of 65 traits related to wood chemistry, anatomy and structure, biomass production and saccharification in 40 genetically engineered Populus tree lines. These lines exhibited broad variation in quantitative traits, allowing for multivariate analyses and mathematical modeling. Modeling revealed that seven wood biomass traits associated in a predictive manner with saccharification of glucose after pretreatment. Four of these seven traits were also negatively associated with biomass production, suggesting a trade-off between saccharification potential and total biomass, which has previously been observed to offset the overall sugar yield from whole trees. We therefore estimated the "total-wood glucose yield" (TWG) from whole trees and found 22 biomass traits predictive of TWG after pretreatment. Both saccharification and TWG were associated with low abundant, often overlooked matrix polysaccharides such as arabinose and rhamnose which possibly represent new markers for improved Populus feedstocks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2017
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142453 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-16013-0 (DOI)000415658600043 ()29150693 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2019-09-06Bibliographically approved
Rende, U., Wang, W., Gandla, M. L., Jönsson, L. J. & Niittylä, T. (2017). Cytosolic invertase contributes to the supply of substrate for cellulose biosynthesis in developing wood. New Phytologist, 214(2), 796-807
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cytosolic invertase contributes to the supply of substrate for cellulose biosynthesis in developing wood
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2017 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 214, no 2, p. 796-807Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon for cellulose biosynthesis is derived from sucrose. Cellulose is synthesized from uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose (UDP-glucose), but the enzyme(s) responsible for the initial sucrose cleavage and the source of UDP-glucose for cellulose biosynthesis in developing wood have not been defined. We investigated the role of CYTOSOLIC INVERTASEs (CINs) during wood formation in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides) and characterized transgenic lines with reduced CIN activity during secondary cell wall biosynthesis. Suppression of CIN activity by 38–55% led to a 9–13% reduction in crystalline cellulose. The changes in cellulose were reflected in reduced diameter of acid-insoluble cellulose microfibrils and increased glucose release from wood upon enzymatic digestion of cellulose. Reduced CIN activity decreased the amount of the cellulose biosynthesis precursor UDP-glucose in developing wood, pointing to the likely cause of the cellulose phenotype. The findings suggest that CIN activity has an important role in the cellulose biosynthesis of trees, and indicate that cellulose biosynthesis in wood relies on a quantifiable UDP-glucose pool. The results also introduce a concept of altering cellulose microfibril properties by modifying substrate supply to cellulose biosynthesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
aspen, cell wall, cellulose, invertase, Populus, wood
National Category
Chemical Sciences Botany Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129988 (URN)10.1111/nph.14392 (DOI)000398134700030 ()28032636 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-01-11 Created: 2017-01-11 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Pawar, P.-A. M., Ratke, C., Balasubramanian, V. K., Chong, S.-L., Gandla, M. L., Adriasola, M., . . . Mellerowicz, E. J. (2017). Downregulation of RWA genes in hybrid aspen affects xylan acetylation and wood saccharification. New Phytologist, 214, 1491-1505
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Downregulation of RWA genes in hybrid aspen affects xylan acetylation and wood saccharification
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2017 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 214, p. 1491-1505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High acetylation of angiosperm wood hinders its conversion to sugars by glycoside hydrolases, subsequent ethanol fermentation and (hence) its use for biofuel production. We studied the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION (RWA) gene family of the hardwood model Populus to evaluate its potential for improving saccharification. The family has two clades, AB and CD, containing two genes each. All four genes are expressed in developing wood but only RWA-A and -B are activated by master switches of the secondary cell wall PtNST1 and PtMYB21. Histochemical analysis of promoter:: GUS lines in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) showed activation of RWA-A and -B promoters in the secondary wall formation zone, while RWA-C and -D promoter activity was diffuse. Ectopic downregulation of either clade reduced wood xylan and xyloglucan acetylation. Suppressing both clades simultaneously using the wood-specific promoter reduced wood acetylation by 25% and decreased acetylation at position 2 of Xylp in the dimethyl sulfoxide-extracted xylan. This did not affect plant growth but decreased xylose and increased glucose contents in the noncellulosic monosaccharide fraction, and increased glucose and xylose yields of wood enzymatic hydrolysis without pretreatment. Both RWA clades regulate wood xylan acetylation in aspen and are promising targets to improve wood saccharification.

Keywords
Cas1p, Populus, REDUCED CELL WALL ACETYLATION, saccharification, wood acetylation, xylan, xylan etylation, xylem
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-137061 (URN)10.1111/nph.14489 (DOI)000402412500011 ()
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Pawar, P.-A. M., Derba-Maceluch, M., Chong, S.-L., Gandla, M. L., Bashar, S. S., Sparrman, T., . . . Mellerowicz, E. J. (2017). In muro deacetylation of xylan affects lignin properties and improves saccharification of aspen wood. Biotechnology for Biofuels, 10, Article ID 98.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In muro deacetylation of xylan affects lignin properties and improves saccharification of aspen wood
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2017 (English)In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 10, article id 98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lignocellulose from fast growing hardwood species is a preferred source of polysaccharides for advanced biofuels and “green” chemicals. However, the extensive acetylation of hardwood xylan hinders lignocellulose saccharification by obstructing enzymatic xylan hydrolysis and causing inhibitory acetic acid concentrations during microbial sugar fermentation. To optimize lignocellulose for cost-effective saccharification and biofuel production, an acetyl xylan esterase AnAXE1 from Aspergillus niger was introduced into aspen and targeted to cell walls.

Results: AnAXE1-expressing plants exhibited reduced xylan acetylation and grew normally. Without pretreatment, their lignocellulose yielded over 25% more glucose per unit mass of wood (dry weight) than wild-type plants. Glucose yields were less improved (+7%) after acid pretreatment, which hydrolyses xylan. The results indicate that AnAXE1 expression also reduced the molecular weight of xylan, and xylan–lignin complexes and/or lignin co-extracted with xylan, increased cellulose crystallinity, altered the lignin composition, reducing its syringyl to guaiacyl ratio, and increased lignin solubility in dioxane and hot water. Lignin-associated carbohydrates became enriched in xylose residues, indicating a higher content of xylo-oligosaccharides.

Conclusions: This work revealed several changes in plant cell walls caused by deacetylation of xylan. We propose that deacetylated xylan is partially hydrolyzed in the cell walls, liberating xylo-oligosaccharides and their associated lignin oligomers from the cell wall network. Deacetylating xylan thus not only increases its susceptibility to hydrolytic enzymes during saccharification but also changes the cell wall architecture, increasing the extractability of lignin and xylan and facilitating saccharification.

Keywords
Acetylation, Xylan, Saccharification, Wood, Populus
National Category
Plant Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-135281 (URN)10.1186/s13068-017-0782-4 (DOI)000399714200002 ()28428822 (PubMedID)
Projects
Bio4Energy
Available from: 2017-05-24 Created: 2017-05-24 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Gandla, M. L., Derba-Maceluch, M., Liu, X., Gerber, L., Master, E. R., Mellerowicz, E. J. & Jönsson, L. J. (2015). Expression of a fungal glucuronoyl esterase in Populus: Effects on wood properties and saccharification efficiency. Phytochemistry, 112, 210-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of a fungal glucuronoyl esterase in Populus: Effects on wood properties and saccharification efficiency
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2015 (English)In: Phytochemistry, ISSN 0031-9422, E-ISSN 1873-3700, Vol. 112, p. 210-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The secondary walls of angiosperms contain large amounts of glucuronoxylan that is thought to be covalently linked to lignin via ester bonds between 4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronic acid (4-O-Me-GlcA) moieties in glucuronoxylan and alcohol groups in lignin. This linkage is proposed to be hydrolysed by glucuronoyl esterases (GCEs) secreted by wood-degrading fungi. We report effects of overexpression of a GCE from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete carnosa, PcGCE, in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x tremuloides Michx.) on the wood composition and the saccharification efficiency. The recombinant enzyme, which was targeted to the plant cell wall using the signal peptide from hybrid aspen cellulase PttCel9B3, was constitutively expressed resulting in the appearance of GCE activity in protein extracts from developing wood. Diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy and pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses showed significant alternation in wood chemistry of transgenic plants including an increase in lignin content and S/G ratio, and a decrease in carbohydrate content Sequential wood extractions confirmed a massive (+43%) increase of Klason lignin, which was accompanied by a ca. 5% decrease in cellulose, and ca. 20% decrease in wood extractives. Analysis of the monosaccharide composition using methanolysis showed a reduction of 4-O-Me-GlcA content without a change in Xyl contents in transgenic lines, suggesting that the covalent links between 4-O-Me-GlcA moieties and lignin protect these moieties from degradation. Enzymatic saccharification without pretreatment resulted in significant decreases of the yields of Gal, Glc, Xyl and Man in transgenic lines, consistent with their increased recalcitrance caused by the increased lignin content In contrast, the enzymatic saccharification after acid pretreatment resulted in Glc yields similar to wild-type despite of their lower cellulose content. These data indicate that whereas PcGCE expression in hybrid aspen increases lignin deposition, the inhibitory effects of lignin are efficiently removed during acid pretreatment, and the extent of wood cellulose conversion during hydrolysis after acid pretreatment is improved in the transgenic lines possible due to reduced cell wall cross-links between cell wall biopolymers by PcGCE. 

Keywords
Hybrid aspen, Populus, Glucuronoyl esterase, CE15, Enzymatic saccharification, Secondary cell wall
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-103218 (URN)10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.06.002 (DOI)000353093700023 ()
Available from: 2015-05-19 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Biswal, A. K., Soeno, K., Gandla, M. L., Immerzeel, P., Pattathil, S., Lucenius, J., . . . Mellerowicz, E. J. (2014). Aspen pectate lyase PtxtPL1-27 mobilizes matrix polysaccharides from woody tissues and improves saccharification yield. Biotechnology for Biofuels, 7, 11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspen pectate lyase PtxtPL1-27 mobilizes matrix polysaccharides from woody tissues and improves saccharification yield
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2014 (English)In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 7, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Wood cell walls are rich in cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Hence, they are important sources of renewable biomass for producing energy and green chemicals. However, extracting desired constituents from wood efficiently poses significant challenges because these polymers are highly cross-linked in cell walls and are not easily accessible to enzymes and chemicals. Results: We show that aspen pectate lyase PL1-27, which degrades homogalacturonan and is expressed at the onset of secondary wall formation, can increase the solubility of wood matrix polysaccharides. Overexpression of this enzyme in aspen increased solubility of not only pectins but also xylans and other hemicelluloses, indicating that homogalacturonan limits the solubility of major wood cell wall components. Enzymatic saccharification of wood obtained from PL1-27-overexpressing trees gave higher yields of pentoses and hexoses than similar treatment of wood from wild-type trees, even after acid pretreatment. Conclusions: Thus, the modification of pectins may constitute an important biotechnological target for improved wood processing despite their low abundance in woody biomass.

Keywords
Populus, Wood development, Secondary cell wall, Lignocellulose, Biofuel, Pectin
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-88345 (URN)10.1186/1754-6834-7-11 (DOI)000332986700001 ()
Available from: 2014-04-30 Created: 2014-04-30 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Winestrand, S., Gandla, M. L., Hong, F., Chen, Q. Z. & Jönsson, L. J. (2012). Oxalate decarboxylase of Trametes versicolor: biochemical characterization and performance in bleaching filtrates from the pulp and paper industry. Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), 87(11), 1600-1606
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxalate decarboxylase of Trametes versicolor: biochemical characterization and performance in bleaching filtrates from the pulp and paper industry
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2012 (English)In: Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), ISSN 0268-2575, E-ISSN 1097-4660, Vol. 87, no 11, p. 1600-1606Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Oxalate decarboxylase (ODC) from acid-induced cultures of the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor was purified and characterized with respect to its biochemical properties and the possibility to utilize the enzyme for treatment of process water with the intention to prevent problems with calcium-oxalate scaling in the pulp and paper industry. RESULTS: Purified T. versicolor ODC was identified by tandem mass spectrometry. As estimated by using SDS-PAGE, the molecular mass was 69 kDa, and 60 kDa after deglycosylation with N-glycosidase F. The pH optimum was 2.5 and the temperature optimum was 4045 degrees C. The effects of ten potential inhibitors in industrial filtrates were examined. The enzyme was sensitive to low concentrations (0.1 mmol L-1) of chlorite and sulfite. T. versicolor ODC exhibited activity in 16 filtrates collected from mechanical pulping and kraft pulping. It had higher activity than ODC from Aspergillus niger in all of the filtrates and higher activity than oxalate oxidase from barley in all filtrates except two. CONCLUSIONS: The investigation shows basic biochemical properties of T. versicolor ODC and indicates that the enzyme may be useful for treatment of industrial filtrates under acidic conditions. Copyright (c) 2012 Society of Chemical Industry

Keywords
oxalate decarboxylase, oxalic acid, Trametes versicolor, bleaching filtrates
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61960 (URN)10.1002/jctb.3801 (DOI)000310251200011 ()
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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