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Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Hylander, J., Saveman, B.-I., Björnstig, U. & Gyllencreutz, L. (2019). Prehospital management provided by medical on-scene commanders in tunnel incidents in Oslo, Norway: an interview study. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 27(1), Article ID 78.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prehospital management provided by medical on-scene commanders in tunnel incidents in Oslo, Norway: an interview study
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 27, no 1, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: High demands are placed on the emergency medical services to handle rescue operations in challenging environments such as tunnels. In Oslo, Norway a specialised management function within the emergency medical services, the medical on-scene commander, in line with the command structure within the police and fire brigade, might support or take over command and control from the ambulance incident officer arriving as the first ambulance personnel on scene. The aim was to shed light on the emergency medical service experiences from real tunnel incidents described by the Oslo medical on-scene commanders.

Methods: Interviews were conducted with six of the seven medical on-scene commander in Oslo, Norway. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis.

Results: The overall theme was "A need for mutual understanding of a tunnel incident". The medical on-scene commander provided tactical support, using their special knowledge of risk objects and resources in the local area. They established operation plans with other emergency services (the police and fire brigade) in a structured and trustful way, thus creating a fluent and coordinated mission. Also, less time was spent arguing at the incident site. By socialising also outside ordinary working hours, a strong foundation of reliance was built between the different parties. A challenge in recent years has been the increasing ordinary workload, giving less opportunity for training and exchange of experiences between the three emergency services.

Conclusions: The enthusiastic pioneers within the three emergency services have created a sense of familiarity and trust. A specially trained medical on-scene commander at a tunnel incident is regarded to improve the medical management. To improve efficiency, this might be worth studying for other emergency medical services with similar conditions, i.e. tunnels in densely populated areas.

Keywords
Medical on-scene commander, Prehospital emergency care, Tunnel incidents
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163681 (URN)10.1186/s13049-019-0649-8 (DOI)000483063100001 ()31429788 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Pedersen, I., Enarsson, E., Saveman, B.-I. & Bölenius, K. (2019). The experience of healthcare staff of incident reporting with respect to venous blood specimen collection practices’. Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, 17(2), 146-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The experience of healthcare staff of incident reporting with respect to venous blood specimen collection practices’
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2019 (English)In: Policy and Practice in Health and Safety, ISSN 1477-3996, E-ISSN 1477-4003, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Venous blood specimen collection is an important practical task that results in an analysis response that often leads to a clinical decision. Errors due to inaccurate venous blood specimen collection are frequently reported and can jeopardize patient safety because inaccurate specimens may result in a delayed or incorrect diagnosis and treatment. However, few healthcare personnel have written an error report regarding venous blood specimen collection practices. The aim of this study is to describe the experiences of healthcare personnel with incident reporting of venous blood specimen collection practices in primary health care. Our study is based on 30 individual interviews with healthcare personnel from 10 primary health care centres. Data were analysed using qualitative content analyses. Personnel experiences of incident reporting were summarized in three categories; Uncertainties in the planning and organization, High workload and low priority and, A need for support and guidance. More specifically, barriers hinder personnel in reporting mistakes. An interpretation based on the results is that surrounding circumstances within the organization influence whether personnel report mistakes or not. The result indicates a need for parallel systems, to identify and report errors or near-misses to prevent mistakes. Processed incidents should be returned promptly to the personnel to use as a learning experience. Having a valid questionnaire and a key person to write an incident report, might reduce the burden on the health care staff and increase the numbers of incident reports and patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Health care, incident reporting, patient safety, venous blood specimen collection
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163716 (URN)10.1080/14773996.2019.1640963 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Aléx, J. & Gyllencreutz, L. (2018). Brister i systematiskt omhändertagande på olycksplatser: en studie av traumasimuleringar inom ambulanssjukvården. Läkartidningen, 115, Article ID EWFH.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brister i systematiskt omhändertagande på olycksplatser: en studie av traumasimuleringar inom ambulanssjukvården
2018 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115, article id EWFHArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trauma care at an accident site is of great importance for patient survival. The purpose of the study was to observe the compliance of ambulance nurses with the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) concept of trauma care in a simulation situation. The material consisted of video recordings in trauma simulation and an observation protocol was designed to analyze the video material. The result showed weaknesses in systematic exam and an ineffective use of time at the scene of injury. Development of observation protocols in trauma simulation can ensure the quality of ambulance nurses' compliance with established concepts. Our pilot study shows that insufficiencies in systematic care lead to an ineffective treatment for trauma patients which in turn may increase the risk of complications and mortality.

Abstract [sv]

Ett systematiskt traumaomhändertagande på olycksplats har stor betydelse för patienters överlevnad. Syftet med denna studie var att observera sjuksköters­kor i ambulanssjukvården och följsamhet till konceptet »prehospital trauma life support« vid traumaomhändertagande i en simuleringssituation. Ett observationsprotokoll utformades för att analysera videoinspelningar. Resultatet visar på brister i det systematiska omhändertagandet och ett ineffektivt omhändertagande på skadeplats. Användandet av observationsprotokoll i traumasimulering kan kvalitetssäkra sjuksköterskors följsamhet till vedertagna koncept.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151319 (URN)29406555 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Rolfsman, E., Frånberg, G.-M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers’ perceptions and injury preventive practices. Education 3-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury risks during outdoor play among Swedish schoolchildren: teachers’ perceptions and injury preventive practices
2018 (English)In: Education 3-13, ISSN 0300-4279, E-ISSN 1475-7575Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Approximately 36,000 Swedish children seek medical care annually because of injuries during school time. The purpose of this field study is to investigate risky outdoor play at the school yard and to describe teachers’ perceptions of risk and safety in relation to learning and development. The study includes observations of children (6–12 years old) during outdoor activities as part of the school’s activities and includes focus-group interviews with teachers and children. Children were seen climbing high in play facilities, speeding down slides, or competing with sticks in the woods. Different views of risk and safety among the participants influence outdoor play activities. Teachers’ knowledge of risk seems to be derived from common sense and personal experiences rather than from a professional perspective. A joint approach of educational and medicine disciplines is desirable when it comes to children’s health and development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Outdoor play, injury prevention, risk, safety, social representation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Pedagogy Pedagogical Work Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-153899 (URN)10.1080/03004279.2018.1551912 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-04-30
Doohan, I. M., Gyllencreutz, L., Björnstig, U. & Saveman, B.-I. (2018). Survivors' experiences of consequences and recovery five years after a major bus crash. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(3), 1179-1187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Survivors' experiences of consequences and recovery five years after a major bus crash
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 1179-1187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rationale: There is a lack of long-term follow-up studies focused on injured and uninjured survivors’ experiences of the recovery process after major traffic crashes.

Aim/objective: To explore survivors’ experiences of long-term physical and psychological consequences and recovery five years after a major bus crash.

Methodological design and justification: A qualitative design was used to explore experiences in a 5-year follow-up study.

Research methods: Participants were 54 survivors of a bus crash with 56 survivors and six fatalities. Telephone interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

Results: The theme overarching the categories is “visible and existential marks in everyday life” and it represents the range of the crash’s influence in the survivors’ lives. The first category, “health consequences in daily life,” has four subcategories covering quick recovery, suffering in daily life, distress in traffic situations, and long-term pain. Described reasons for quick recovery among survivors were previous crisis experiences, traveling alone, being uninjured, and not being exposed to traumatic impressions. For the other survivors, being reminded of the crash caused disturbing reactions, such as sweating, anxiety, and flashbacks. Survivors avoided going by bus if they could. A group of the injured survivors were still suffering from limiting and painful injuries. The second category, “oneself and social connection,” has three subcategories that include self-awareness, impact on relationships, and connectedness. Survivors developed a stronger bond to their significant other or separated from their partner within the first couple of years. Friendships and a sense of connectedness among survivors were sources of long-lasting comfort and support.

Conclusion: There is a need for more information about disruptive long-lasting consequences, such as travel anxiety, and available treatments. Initially, health-promoting connectedness can be facilitated by treating survivors as a group of people who belong together, from the day of the crash and throughout the recovery process. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
Busskrasch, överlevande, upplevelser, erfarenheter, trafikskadehändelser, återhämtning, långtidsuppföljning
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences; health services research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-140190 (URN)10.1111/scs.12563 (DOI)000445450800020 ()29436007 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-10-03 Created: 2017-10-03 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, S., Gyllencreutz, L., Engström, G., Björnstig, U. & Saveman, B.-I. (2017). Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers. Safety Science Monitor, 20(1), Article ID 5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparedness for mining injury incidents: interviews with Swedish rescuers
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2017 (English)In: Safety Science Monitor, ISSN 1443-8844, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. To explore the perceptions and experiences of mining-, rescue service- (RS), and emergency medical service (EMS) personnel regarding how to handle incidents in an underground mine.

Methods. Six focus-group interviews and 10 individual interviews were carried out with groups of mining-, RS and EMS personnel, who served the underground mining industry located in small municipalities in a sparsely populated area of northern Sweden. The transcripts of the interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results. The three groups mostly described experiences of minor incidents and announced a limited preparedness for handling major mining incidents. Collaboration was described as being difficult because of limited knowledge about the others’ responsibilities and capacities. Few non-mining personnel were trained, or prepared to fulfil their tasks in an underground environment, and some expressed that they would even refuse to go underground because of concerns for their own safety.

Conclusions. There is a need for more collaboration and joint practices between and among the groups involved in rescue operations. Collaboration between mine- and RS personnel exists, but the EMS personnel is largely excluded from this interaction. Therefore, the EMS personnel are insecure about how to handle underground mining incidents. A closer collaboration between all organizations in preparing for mining incidents is emphasized, and would have positive effects on the rescue operation. Some experiences may also be used under similar circumstances, such as incidents in railway and road tunnels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Haninge: IPSO Australia, 2017
Keywords
Collaboration, EMS, mine injury incidents, preparedness, rescue operation, rescue service, Sweden, underground mining
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-138757 (URN)
Available from: 2017-08-30 Created: 2017-08-30 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Bölenius, K., Vestin, C., Saveman, B.-I. & Gyllencreutz, L. (2017). Validating a questionnaire - prehospital preparedness for pediatric trauma patients. International Emergency Nursing, 34, 2-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validating a questionnaire - prehospital preparedness for pediatric trauma patients
2017 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 34, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent decades, prehospital emergency care has undergone extensive development. Today, prehospital emergency nurses (PENs) are well trained and provide advanced care to patients of all ages. Caring for pediatric trauma patients is considered to be particularly demanding. However, in Sweden and internationally, there is a lack of research regarding PENs' preparedness for caring for pediatric trauma patients.

Objective: The development and testing of a questionnaire on self-reported preparedness among PENs caring for pediatric trauma patients in a prehospital emergency setting.

Methods: Questionnaire development included face and content validity tests resulting in 38 questions. Eighteen of these questions were analyzed by test-retest. The content of the questionnaire was statistically analyzed.

Results: Fifteen questions were considered valid after reliability and validity tests. Three questions did not fulfill the stability criteria. The content analyses show a low degree of experience with pediatric trauma patients and half of the participants reported stress symptoms when responding to such alarms.

Conclusion: The questionnaire assessing PENs preparedness caring for pediatric trauma patients in Sweden is considered to be suitable for research and clinical practice to improve the care of pediatric trauma patients and the health of PENs, although further testing of the questionnaire is required.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143596 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2017.05.003 (DOI)000417589600002 ()28545931 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L. & Saveman, B.-I. (2015). Everyday outdoor mobility in old age: focus group interviews with active senior citizens. Healthy Aging Research, 4, Article ID 32.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Everyday outdoor mobility in old age: focus group interviews with active senior citizens
2015 (English)In: Healthy Aging Research, ISSN 2261-7434, Vol. 4, article id 32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Senior citizens are over-represented in injury statistics, and fall-related injuries are globally recognized as a major threat to their health and wellbeing. Outdoor falls are likely to occur among those who are active and healthy when walking or cycling. The objective of this study was to explore active senior citizens’ experiences and perceptions of how their safety could be increased and their risk reduced in outdoor environments.

Methods: Six focus-group interviews with 31 healthy and active senior citizens were conducted in northern Sweden. Data were analyzed via a qualitative content analysis method.

Results: Participants adjusted to age-related changes in order to stay safe during outdoor mobility. Outdoor activities were facilitated by having confidence of safety within the environment, and by using safety devices. Fear of, for example, falling and dangerous environments, such as uneven surfaces, as well as the shortcomings of safety devices, were constraining elements for outdoor activity.

Conclusions: It is of great importance to raise awareness of healthy aging and to illuminate directions for environmental changes. Asking old people about their experiences allows the researcher to identify with their perspective, and may give a more comprehensive understanding of the most appropriate recommendations for health and safety improvements.

Keywords
outdoor, fall, healthy aging, old age, mobility, injury prevention
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102912 (URN)10.12715/har.2015.4.32 (DOI)000373688900001 ()
External cooperation:
Available from: 2015-05-10 Created: 2015-05-10 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Rolfsman, E. & Saveman, B.-I. (2015). Non-minor injuries among children sustained in an outdoor environment: a retrospective register study. International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion, 22(1), 3-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-minor injuries among children sustained in an outdoor environment: a retrospective register study
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion, ISSN 1745-7300, E-ISSN 1745-7319, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to investigate non-minor injuries sustained during outdoor activities among 0-12 year old children and to explore self-reported circumstances surrounding these incidents. During 2007-2009, the Umea University Hospital injury database (IDB) registered 795 children with moderate (n = 778) and serious (n = 17) injuries, such as fractures. The IDB includes data from a questionnaire completed in the emergency department by the injured child or a parent. The open-ended questions catch the injured child's description of what circumstances precede the injury incident. The most commonly reported activities contributing to injuries were play, sport, and transport. Surface impacts were also reported as contributing factors along with products such as trampolines, bicycles, and downhill skis. By achieving a deeper knowledge about the activities and circumstances that precede non-minor injury incidents, creating safer outdoor environments may be feasible.

Keywords
outdoor, children, prevention, injury, play
National Category
Health Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80540 (URN)10.1080/17457300.2013.833945 (DOI)000351835400002 ()
Available from: 2013-09-20 Created: 2013-09-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Gyllencreutz, L., Björnstig, J., Rolfsman, E. & Saveman, B.-I. (2015). Outdoor pedestrian fall-related injuries among Swedish senior citizens: injuries and preventive strategies. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 29(2), 225-233
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outdoor pedestrian fall-related injuries among Swedish senior citizens: injuries and preventive strategies
2015 (Swedish)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 225-233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Senior citizens get around, to a large extent, as pedestrians, and safe walking is desirable for senior citizens allowing them to stay mobile, independent and healthy in old age. Senior citizens are over-represented in injury statistics, and fall-related injuries are common. The aim of this study was to investigate fall-related injuries including healthcare costs among senior citizen pedestrians injured when walking in public outdoor environments and to describe their self-reported causes and suggested preventive strategies. The data were based on a combination of information from injury data and a questionnaire. Three hundred senior citizens attended one emergency department after sustaining injuries from pedestrian falls; 60% suffered nonminor injuries, mostly fractures. One-fifth of the pedestrians were hospitalised for an average of 8 days with an indirect hospital cost of 6.2 million EUR (55 million SEK). Environmental factors such as ice were the most commonly described cause of the injury incident. Forty per cent of the respondents indicated that the municipality was responsible for the cause of the injury incident. Fewer respondents mentioned their own responsibility as a preventive strategy. Thirty per cent described a combination of improvements such as better road maintenance, changes in human behaviour and use of safety products as preventive strategies. It is of great importance to highlight general safety, products and preventive strategies to minimise injury risks, so that pedestrians can safely realise the known health benefits of walking and thereby limit healthcare costs.

Keywords
elderly, outdoor, environment, fall, prevention, safety
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92582 (URN)10.1111/scs.12153 (DOI)000354260700004 ()24913321 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-29 Created: 2014-08-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1848-060x

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