umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Lehtipalo, Stefan
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Tydén, J., Larsson, N., Lehtipalo, S., Herwald, H., Hultin, M., Walldén, J., . . . Johansson, J. (2018). Heparin-binding protein in ventilator-induced lung injury.. Intensive Care Medicine Experimental, 6(1), Article ID 33.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heparin-binding protein in ventilator-induced lung injury.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental, ISSN 1646-2335, E-ISSN 2197-425X, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although mechanical ventilation is often lifesaving, it can also cause injury to the lungs. The lung injury is caused by not only high pressure and mechanical forces but also by inflammatory processes that are not fully understood. Heparin-binding protein (HBP), released by activated granulocytes, has been indicated as a possible mediator of increased vascular permeability in the lung injury associated with trauma and sepsis. We investigated if HBP levels were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) or plasma in a pig model of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). We also investigated if HBP was present in BALF from healthy volunteers and in intubated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).

METHODS: Anaesthetized pigs were randomized to receive ventilation with either tidal volumes of 8 ml/kg (controls, n = 6) or 20 ml/kg (VILI group, n = 6). Plasma and BALF samples were taken at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 h. In humans, HBP levels in BALF were sampled from 16 healthy volunteers and from 10 intubated patients being cared for in the ICU.

RESULTS: Plasma levels of HBP did not differ between pigs in the control and VILI groups. The median HBP levels in BALF were higher in the VILI group after 6 h of ventilation compared to those in the controls (1144 ng/ml (IQR 359-1636 ng/ml) versus 89 ng/ml (IQR 33-191 ng/ml) ng/ml, respectively, p = 0.02). The median HBP level in BALF from healthy volunteers was 0.90 ng/ml (IQR 0.79-1.01 ng/ml) as compared to 1959 ng/ml (IQR 612-3306 ng/ml) from intubated ICU patients (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: In a model of VILI in pigs, levels of HBP in BALF increased over time compared to controls, while plasma levels did not differ between the two groups. HBP in BALF was high in intubated ICU patients in spite of the seemingly non-harmful ventilation, suggesting that inflammation from other causes might increase HBP levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SpringerOpen, 2018
Keywords
HBP, Neutrophils, Pigs, Ventilator-induced lung injury
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151814 (URN)10.1186/s40635-018-0198-x (DOI)000445485300001 ()30203380 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2019-09-02Bibliographically approved
Larsson, N., Gouveia-Figueira, S., Claesson, J., Lehtipalo, S., Behndig, A., Tyden, J., . . . Nording, M. L. (2016). Oxylipin Profiling In The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Paper presented at International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), MAY 13-18, 2016, San Francisco, CA. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 193, Article ID A4419.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxylipin Profiling In The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Show others...
2016 (English)In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 193, article id A4419Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-131012 (URN)000390749603801 ()
Conference
International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), MAY 13-18, 2016, San Francisco, CA
Available from: 2017-02-16 Created: 2017-02-16 Last updated: 2019-05-06Bibliographically approved
Larsson, N., Claesson Lingehall, H., Al Zaidi, N., Claesson, J., Jensen-Waern, M. & Lehtipalo, S. (2015). Percutaneously inserted long-term central venous catheters in pigs of different sizes. Laboratory Animals. Journal of the Laboratory Animal Science Association, 49(3), 215-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Percutaneously inserted long-term central venous catheters in pigs of different sizes
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Laboratory Animals. Journal of the Laboratory Animal Science Association, ISSN 0023-6772, E-ISSN 1758-1117, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 215-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pigs are used for long-term biomedical experiments requiring repeated injections, infusions and collections of blood samples. Thus, it is necessary for vascular catheters to be indwelling to avoid undue stress to the animals and the use of restraints. We propose a refined model of percutaneous insertion of long-term central venous catheters to minimize the surgical trauma and postoperative complications associated with catheter insertion. Different sizes of needles (18 Ga versus 21 Ga) for initial puncture of the veins were compared. In conventional pigs weighing less than 30 kg, catheter insertion may be facilitated by using a microintroducer set with a 21 Ga needle. In pigs weighing 50 kg, a standard 18 Ga needle may be preferable.

Keywords
seldinger technique, microintroducer, refinement, swine, vascular access
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Surgery Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102330 (URN)10.1177/0023677215575222 (DOI)000357538000006 ()25732575 (PubMedID)1758-1117 (Electronic) 0023-6772 (Linking) (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-04-23 Created: 2015-04-23 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, L., Lehtipalo, S., Winsö, O., Karlsson, M., Wiklund, U. & Brulin, C. (2013). Touch massage: a pilot study of a complex intervention. Nursing in Critical Care, 18(6), 269-277
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Touch massage: a pilot study of a complex intervention
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 269-277Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To report and evaluate a complex touch massage intervention according to the British Medical Research Council framework. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of touch massage on levels of anxiety and physiological stress in patients scheduled for elective aortic surgery.

Background: The use of touch massage has increased during the past decade but no systematic studies have been implemented to investigate the effectiveness of such treatment. It is important to conduct multidisciplinary investigations into the effects of complex interventions such as touch massage. For this, the British Medical Research Council has provided a useful framework to guide the development, piloting, evaluation and reporting of complex intervention studies.

Method: A pilot study with a randomized controlled design including 20 patients (10 + 10) scheduled for elective aortic surgery. Selected outcome parameters included; self-reported anxiety, measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y instrument, and physiological stress, measured by heart rate variability, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, oxygen saturation and concentrations of cortisol, insulin and glucose in serum.

Results: There were significant differences in self-reported anxiety levels before and after touch massage (p = 0·007), this was not observed in the control group (p = 0·833). There was a significant difference in self-reported anxiety levels between the touch massage group and the control group after touch massage and rest (p = 0·001). There were no significant differences in physiological stress-related outcome parameters between patients who received touch massage and controls.

Conclusion: In our study, touch massage decreased anxiety levels in patients scheduled for elective aortic surgery, and the British Medical Research Council framework was a useful guideline for the development, evaluation and reporting of a touch massage intervention.

Relevance to clinical practice: Touch massage can reduce patients' anxiety levels and is thus an important nursing intervention in intensive and post-operative care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
Adult intensive care, Care nursing, Clinical research, Complex interventions, Intensive, Psychological care of patients, Research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61495 (URN)10.1111/nicc.12017 (DOI)000326030800004 ()
Available from: 2012-11-15 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, L., Westling, G., Brulin, C., Lehtipalo, S., Andersson, M. & Nyberg, L. (2012). Pleasant human touch is represented in pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. NeuroImage, 59(4), 3427-3432
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pleasant human touch is represented in pregenual anterior cingulate cortex
Show others...
2012 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 3427-3432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Touch massage (TM) is a form of pleasant touch stimulation used as treatment in clinical settings and found to improve well-being and decrease anxiety, stress, and pain. Emotional responses reported during and after TM have been studied, but the underlying mechanisms are still largely unexplored. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) to test the hypothesis that the combination of human touch (i.e. skin-to-skin contact) with movement is eliciting a specific response in brain areas coding for pleasant sensations. The design included four different touch conditions; human touch with or without movement and rubber glove with or without movement. Force (2.5N) and velocity (1.5cm/s) were held constant across conditions. The pleasantness of the four different touch stimulations was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS-scale) and human touch was rated as most pleasant, particularly in combination with movement. The fMRI results revealed that TM stimulation most strongly activated the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC). These results are consistent with findings showing pgACC activation during various rewarding pleasant stimulations. This area is also known to be activated by both opioid analgesia and placebo. Together with these prior results, our finding furthers the understanding of the basis for positive TM treatment effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Brain, Human touch, Massage, Pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, fMRI, Pleasantness
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51173 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.11.013 (DOI)22100768 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lindgren, L., Rundgren, S., Winsö, O., Lehtipalo, S., Wiklund, U., Karlsson, M., . . . Brulin, C. (2010). Physiological responses to touch massage in healthy volunteers. Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic & Clinical, 158(1-2), 105-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physiological responses to touch massage in healthy volunteers
Show others...
2010 (English)In: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic & Clinical, ISSN 1566-0702, E-ISSN 1872-7484, Vol. 158, no 1-2, p. 105-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate effects of touch massage (TM) on stress responses in healthy volunteers.

METHODS: A crossover design including twenty-two (mean age=28.2) healthy volunteers (11 male and 11 female) cardiac autonomic tone was measured by heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Stress hormone levels (cortisol) were followed in saliva. We also measured blood glucose and serum insulin. Extracellular (ECV) levels of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol were followed using the microdialysis technique (MD). TM was performed on hands and feet for 80min, during control, participants rested in the same setting. Data were collected before, during, and after TM and at rest. Saliva cortisol, serum glucose, and serum insulin were collected before, immediately following, and 1h after intervention or control, respectively.

RESULTS: After 5min TM, HR decreased significantly, indicating a reduced stress response. Total HRV and all HRV components decreased during intervention. Saliva cortisol and insulin levels decreased significantly after intervention, while serum glucose levels remained stable. A similar, though less prominent, pattern was seen during the control situation. Only minor changes were observed in ECV levels of glucose (a decrease) and lactate (an increase). No significant alterations were observed in glycerol or pyruvate levels throughout the study. There were no significant differences between groups in ECV concentrations of analyzed substances.

CONCLUSIONS: In healthy volunteers, TM decreased sympathetic nervous activity, leading to decreased overall autonomic activity where parasympathetic nervous activity also decreased, thereby maintaining the autonomic balance.

Keywords
Touch, Massage, Autonomic nervous system, Heart rate variability, Saliva cortisol, Glucose, Insulin, Microdialysis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37167 (URN)10.1016/j.autneu.2010.06.011 (DOI)000284926900017 ()20638912 (PubMedID)1872-7484 (Electronic) 1566-0702 (Linking) (ISBN)
Note
Journal article Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical Auton Neurosci. 2010 Jul 16.Available from: 2010-10-25 Created: 2010-10-21 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Claesson, J., Lehtipalo, S., Johansson, G., Abrahamsson, P., Palmqvist, R., Biber, B. & Winsö, O. (2008). Evaluation of intestinal preconditioning in a porcine model using classic ischemic preconditioning or lung recruitment maneuvers.. Shock, 21(1), 98-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of intestinal preconditioning in a porcine model using classic ischemic preconditioning or lung recruitment maneuvers.
Show others...
2008 (English)In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To test the hypotheses that repeated brief intestinal ischemic insults would elicit an intestinal preconditioning response to a subsequent intestinal I/R injury and that a similar response would be elicited by repeated lung recruitment maneuvers (RMs). Randomized experimental controlled animal study. University hospital animal laboratory. Eighteen anesthetized pigs. Animals were randomized to one of three groups, with six animals in each group. Control group 75-min superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion followed by 60-min reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning group, three 5-min-long SMA occlusions preceding 75-min SMA occlusion and 60-min reperfusion. Recruitment maneuver (RM) group, three 2-min-long RMs preceding 75-min SMA occlusion and 60-min reperfusion. We measured systemic and mesenteric hemodynamic parameters, jejunal mucosal perfusion, net mesenteric lactate flux, jejunal tissue oxygen tension, and mesenteric oxygenation. Every 15 min, jejunal microdialysate samples were collected and analyzed for glucose, lactate, and glycerol. Jejunal tissue samples were collected postmortem. After occlusion of SMA, regional parameters in all groups indicated abolished perfusion and gradually increasing intraluminal microdialysate lactate and glycerol levels. At reperfusion, regional parameters indicated mesenteric hyperperfusion, whereas microdialysis markers of mucosal anaerobic metabolism and cell injury decreased, although not reaching baseline. Histological examination revealed severe mucosal injury in all groups. There were no significant differences between groups in the observed parameters. No protective preconditioning response could be observed when performing repeated brief intestinal ischemic insults or repeated lung RMs before an intestinal I/R injury.

Keywords
Animals, Blood Pressure/physiology, Epinephrine/pharmacology, Isoflurane/pharmacology, Myocardial Contraction/*drug effects/physiology, Myocardial Revascularization/methods, Stroke Volume, Swine, Vasoconstrictor Agents/pharmacology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7125 (URN)18157068 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-01-04 Created: 2008-01-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Claesson, J., Lehtipalo, S., Bergstrand, U., Arnerlöv, C. & Winsö, O. (2007). Negative mesenteric effects of lung recruitment maneuvers in oleic acid lung injury are transient and short lasting.. Critical Care Medicine, 35(1), 230-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negative mesenteric effects of lung recruitment maneuvers in oleic acid lung injury are transient and short lasting.
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 230-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that repeated recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have sustained negative effects on mesenteric circulation, metabolism, and oxygenation 60 mins after RMs in pigs with oleic acid lung injury. Further, we aimed to test the hypothesis that an infusion of prostacyclin (PC) at 33 ng.kg.min would attenuate such possible negative mesenteric effects. DESIGN: Randomized, experimental, controlled study. SETTING: University hospital animal laboratory. SUBJECTS: A total of 31 anesthetized, fluid-resuscitated pigs with oleic acid lung injury. INTERVENTIONS: Animals were randomized to one of the following four groups: a control group (n = 7) that received no intervention, recruitment group (n = 8) that underwent the RM sequence, a prostacyclin group (n = 8) that received an infusion of PC, and a recruitment-prostacyclin group (n = 8) that received an infusion of PC and concomitant RM sequence. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We measured systemic and mesenteric hemodynamic variables, jejunal mucosal perfusion, mesenteric lactate flux, jejunal tissue oxygen tension, and mesenteric oxygen delivery, uptake, and extraction ratio. Five minutes after RMs, mesenteric oxygen extraction ratio and mesenteric lactate flux were more prominently increased in the recruitment group, giving evidence of worsened mesenteric conditions after RMs. These signs of worsened conditions were further supported by more decreased jejunal tissue oxygen tension and portal vein oxygen saturation in the recruitment group. PC preserved mesenteric oxygenation, as indicated by less of a decrease in portal vein oxygen saturation at the time corresponding to 5 mins after RM and less of a decrease in mesenteric oxygen delivery at the time corresponding to 15 mins after RM. PC preserved mesenteric oxygenation as indicated by less of a decrease in portal vein oxygen saturation at 5 mins after RM and an attenuated increase in mesenteric oxygen extraction ratio at 5 mins after RM. There was a trend toward worsened jejunal mucosal perfusion, although not significant. CONCLUSIONS: In an oleic acid lung injury model, three repeated RMs did not improve systemic oxygenation or lung mechanics. Negative effects on mesenteric oxygenation and metabolism were transient and short lasting. The intestinal effects of PC during RMs were minor and opposing, showing preserved oxygenation but a trend toward worsened mucosal perfusion.

Keywords
Animals, Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology/*therapeutic use, Blood Flow Velocity/drug effects, Blood Gas Analysis, Blood Pressure/drug effects, Cardiac Output/drug effects, Disease Models; Animal, Drug Evaluation; Preclinical, Epoprostenol/pharmacology/*therapeutic use, Female, Infusions; Intravenous, Intestinal Mucosa/blood supply/drug effects/metabolism, Jejunum/blood supply/drug effects/metabolism, Lactic Acid/metabolism, Lung Volume Measurements, Oleic Acid, Oxygen Consumption/drug effects, Random Allocation, Respiration; Artificial/adverse effects/methods, Respiratory Distress Syndrome; Adult/chemically induced/metabolism/physiopathology/*therapy, Respiratory Mechanics/drug effects, Splanchnic Circulation/drug effects, Swine, Time Factors
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7123 (URN)17110875 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-01-04 Created: 2008-01-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Claesson, J., Lehtipalo, S., Bergstrand, U., Arnerlöv, C., Rocksen, D., Hultin, M. & Winsö, O. (2005). Intestinal circulation, oxygenation and metabolism is not affected by oleic acid lung injury.. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, 25(6), 357-363
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intestinal circulation, oxygenation and metabolism is not affected by oleic acid lung injury.
Show others...
2005 (English)In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 357-363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study was performed to establish a platform for further studies on effects of ventilatory treatment modalities on the intestines during mechanical ventilation of acute lung injury (ALI). We tested the hypotheses that oleic acid (OA) infusion causes changes in intestinal circulation, oxygenation and metabolism, and that OA is distributed to tissues outside the lung. This was performed as an experimental, prospective and controlled study in an university animal research laboratory. Thirteen juvenile anaesthetized pigs were used in the main study, where seven were given an intravenous infusion of 0.1 ml kg(-1) OA and six served as control (surgery only). In a separate study, four animals were given an intravenous infusion of 0.1 ml kg(-1) (3)H-labelled OA. We measured systemic and mesenteric (portal venous blood flow, jejunal mucosal perfusion) haemodynamic parameters, mesenteric oxygenation (jejunal tissue oxygen tension) and systemic cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6). We calculated mesenteric lactate flux and mesenteric oxygen delivery, uptake and extraction ratio. In the animals given 3H-OA, we measured 3H-OA in different tissues (lungs, heart, liver, kidney, stomach, jejunum, colon and arterial blood). We found that OA given intravenously is distributed in small amounts to the intestines. This intestinal exposure to OA does not cause intestinal injury when evaluating mesenteric blood flow, metabolism or oxygenation. OA infusion induced a moderate increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and a decrease in PaO2/Fraction inspired O2 (P/F) ratio, giving evidence of severe lung injury. Consequently, the OA lung injury model is suitable for studies on intestinal effects of ventilatory treatment modalities during mechanical ventilation of ALI.

Keywords
Animals, Disease Models; Animal, Female, Injections; Intravenous, Intestines/*blood supply/drug effects/*physiopathology, Metabolic Clearance Rate, Oleic Acid/*administration & dosage/*pharmacokinetics, Oxygen/*metabolism, Respiratory Distress Syndrome; Adult/chemically induced/*physiopathology, Swine, Tissue Distribution
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6033 (URN)10.1111/j.1475-097X.2005.00640.x (DOI)16268988 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-12-18 Created: 2007-12-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fröjse, R., Lehtipalo, S., Winsö, O., Johansson, G., Biber, B. & Arnerlöv, C. (2004). Assessment of graded intestinal hypoperfusion and reperfusion using continuous saline tonometry in a porcine model.. European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, 28(1), 79-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of graded intestinal hypoperfusion and reperfusion using continuous saline tonometry in a porcine model.
Show others...
2004 (English)In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 79-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of graded intestinal hypoperfusion and reperfusion on intestinal metabolic parameters as assessed by a modified continuous saline tonometry technique. MATERIALS: Twelve barbiturate-anaesthetized female pigs. METHODS: Measurements were performed prior to and during three predefined levels of superior mesenteric mean arterial blood pressure (P(SMA) 70, 50 and 30 mmHg, respectively, each 80 min long), obtained by an adjustable clamp around the origin of the superior mesenteric artery, and during reperfusion. We continuously measured jejunal mucosal perfusion (laser Doppler flowmetry), jejunal tissue oxygen tension (PO(2TISSUE); microoximetry) and intramucosal PCO(2) (continuous saline tonometry) and calculated net intestinal lactate production, mesenteric oxygenation, PCO(2) gap (jejunal mucosal PCO(2)-arterial PCO(2)) and pHi. RESULTS: At P(SMA) 70 and 50 mmHg mesenteric oxygen uptake and net lactate production remained unaltered, in spite of decreased oxygen delivery. At these P(SMA) levels PCO(2) gap increased, while pHi and PO(2TISSUE) decreased. At P(SMA) 30 mmHg pronounced increases in PCO(2) gap and mesenteric net lactate production as well as marked decreases in PO(2TISSUE) and pHi were demonstrated. Data indicate absence of anaerobic conditions at an intestinal perfusion pressure (IPP)> or =41 mmHg, a pHi> or =7.22 or PCO(2) gap< or =15.8 mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous saline tonometry detected intestinal ischemia as induced by graded reductions in IPP. A threshold could be defined above which intestinal ischemia does not occur.

Keywords
Animals, Blood Pressure/physiology, Cardiac Output/physiology, Female, Heart Rate/physiology, Intestines/blood supply/*metabolism, Manometry, Mesenteric Artery; Superior/metabolism, Models; Animal, Models; Cardiovascular, Oxygen Consumption/physiology, Regional Blood Flow/physiology, Reperfusion, Severity of Illness Index, Sodium Chloride/*pharmacology, Swine, Vascular Resistance/physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6007 (URN)10.1016/j.ejvs.2004.02.009 (DOI)15177236 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-12-18 Created: 2007-12-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications