umu.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Ohlson, Nina
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Obón-Santacana, M., Kaaks, R., Slimani, N., Lujan-Barroso, L., Freisling, H., Ferrari, P., . . . Duell, E. J. (2014). Dietary intake of acrylamide and endometrial cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. British Journal of Cancer, 111(5), 987-997
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary intake of acrylamide and endometrial cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort
Show others...
2014 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 111, no 5, p. 987-997Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Three prospective studies have evaluated the association between dietary acrylamide intake and endometrial cancer (EC) risk with inconsistent results. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between acrylamide intake and EC risk: for overall EC, for type-I EC, and in never smokers and never users of oral contraceptives (OCs). Smoking is a source of acrylamide, and OC use is a protective factor for EC risk. METHODS: Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the association between acrylamide intake and EC risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Acrylamide intake was estimated from the EU acrylamide monitoring database, which was matched with EPIC questionnaire-based food consumption data. Acrylamide intake was energy adjusted using the residual method. RESULTS: No associations were observed between acrylamide intake and overall EC (n = 1382) or type-I EC risk (n = 627). We observed increasing relative risks for type-I EC with increasing acrylamide intake among women who both never smoked and were non-users of OCs (HRQ5vsQ1: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.08-3.62; likelihood ratio test (LRT) P-value: 0.01, n = 203). CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intake of acrylamide was not associated with overall or type-I EC risk; however, positive associations with type I were observed in women who were both non-users of OCs and never smokers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2014
Keywords
acrylamide, endometrial cancer, type-I endometrial cancer, cohort, nutrition
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94154 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2014.328 (DOI)000341527100023 ()
Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-06 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Andersson, C., Oji, Y., Ohlson, N., Wang, S., Li, X., Ottander, U., . . . Li, A. (2014). Prognostic significance of specific anti-WT1 IgG antibody level in plasma in patients with ovarian carcinoma. Cancer Medicine, 3(4), 909-918
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prognostic significance of specific anti-WT1 IgG antibody level in plasma in patients with ovarian carcinoma
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 909-918Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ovarian carcinoma (OC) has a poor prognosis and lack early effective screening markers. Wilm's tumor gene 1 (WT1) is overexpressed in OCs. Therefore, it is of great interest to investigate whether WT1-specific antibody (Ab) measurements in plasma can serve as a biomarker of anti-OC response, and is of importance in relation to patient prognosis. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from a total of 103 women with ovarian tumors with median being 1 day (range 0-48 days) before operation. WT1 IgG Ab levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunohistochemical analysis of WT1 protein expression was performed on OC tissue samples. We found that low-WT1 Ab level in plasma was related to improved survival in patients diagnosed at stages III-IV and grade 3 carcinomas. Positive WT1 protein staining on OC tissue samples had a negative impact on survival in the entire cohort, both overall survival (OS) (P = 0.046) and progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.006), but not in the serous OC subtype. Combining WT1 IgG Ab levels and WT1 staining, patients with high-WT1 IgG Ab levels in plasma and positive WT1 protein staining in cancer tissues had shorter survival, with a significant association in PFS (P = 0.016). These results indicated that WT1 Ab measurements in plasma and WT1 staining in tissue specimens could be useful as biomarkers for patient outcome in the high-risk subtypes of OCs for postoperative individualized therapy.

Keywords
Ovarian carcinoma, prognosis, WT1, WT1 IgG antibody
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100163 (URN)10.1002/cam4.244 (DOI)000348222300016 ()24715586 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-02-24 Created: 2015-02-24 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Clendenen, T. V., Arslan, A. A., Lokshin, A. E., Liu, M., Lundin, E., Koenig, K. L., . . . Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A. (2013). Circulating prolactin levels and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. Cancer Causes and Control, 24(4), 741-748
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating prolactin levels and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Indirect evidence from experimental and epidemiological studies suggests that prolactin may be involved in ovarian cancer development. However, the relationship between circulating prolactin levels and risk of ovarian cancer is unknown.

We conducted a nested case-control study of 230 cases and 432 individually matched controls within three prospective cohorts to evaluate whether pre-diagnostic circulating prolactin is associated with subsequent risk of ovarian cancer. We also assessed whether lifestyle and reproductive factors are associated with circulating prolactin among controls.

Prolactin levels were significantly lower among post- versus pre-menopausal women, parous versus nulliparous women, and past versus never users of oral contraceptives in our cross-sectional analysis of controls. In our nested case-control study, we observed a non-significant positive association between circulating prolactin and ovarian cancer risk (ORQ4vsQ1 1.56, 95 % CI 0.94, 2.63, p trend 0.15). Our findings were similar in multivariate-adjusted models and in the subgroup of women who donated blood a parts per thousand yen5 years prior to diagnosis. We observed a significant positive association between prolactin and risk for the subgroup of women with BMI a parts per thousand yen25 kg/m(2) (ORQ4vsQ1 3.10, 95 % CI 1.39, 6.90), but not for women with BMI < 25 kg/m(2) (ORQ4vsQ1 0.81, 95 % CI 0.40, 1.64).

Our findings suggest that prolactin may be associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer, particularly in overweight/obese women. Factors associated with reduced risk of ovarian cancer, such as parity and use of oral contraceptives, were associated with lower prolactin levels, which suggests that modulation of prolactin may be a mechanism underlying their association with risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2013
Keywords
Prolactin, Ovarian cancer, Serum, Plasma
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-68468 (URN)10.1007/s10552-013-0156-6 (DOI)000316352900012 ()
Available from: 2013-04-25 Created: 2013-04-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Braem, M. G. M., Onland-Moret, N. C., Schouten, L. J., Tjonneland, A., Hansen, L., Dahm, C. C., . . . Peeters, P. H. M. (2012). Coffee and tea consumption and the risk of ovarian cancer: a prospective cohort study and updated meta-analysis. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 95(5), 1172-1181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coffee and tea consumption and the risk of ovarian cancer: a prospective cohort study and updated meta-analysis
Show others...
2012 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 1172-1181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In 2007 the World Cancer Research Fund Report concluded that there was limited and inconsistent evidence for an effect of coffee and tea consumption on the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Objective: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), we aimed to investigate whether coffee intakes, tea intakes, or both are associated with the risk of EOC. Design: All women participating in the EPIC (n = 330,849) were included in this study. Data on coffee and tea consumption were collected through validated food-frequency questionnaires at baseline. HRs and 95% CIs were estimated by using Cox proportional hazards models. Furthermore, we performed an updated meta-analysis of all previous prospective studies until April 2011 by comparing the highest and lowest coffee- and tea-consumption categories as well as by using dose-response random-effects meta-regression analyses. Results: During a median follow-up of 11.7 y, 1244 women developed EOC. No association was observed between the risk of EOC and coffee consumption [HR: 1.05 (95% CI: 0.75, 1.46) for the top quintile compared with no intake] or tea consumption [HR: 1.07 (95% Cl: 0.78, 1.45) for the top quintile compared with no intake]. This lack of association between coffee and tea intake and EOC risk was confirmed by the results of our meta-analysis. Conclusion: Epidemiologic studies do not provide sufficient evidence to support an association between coffee and tea consumption and risk of ovarian cancer. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;95:1172-81.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bethesda: American Society for Nutrition, 2012
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55501 (URN)10.3945/ajcn.111.026393 (DOI)000303140700023 ()
Available from: 2012-05-28 Created: 2012-05-21 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Braem, M. G. M., Onland-Moret, N. C., Schouten, L. J., Kruitwagen, R. F. P., Lukanova, A., Allen, N. E., . . . Peeters, P. H. M. (2012). Multiple Miscarriages Are Associated with the Risk of Ovarian Cancer: Results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. PLoS ONE, 7(5), e37141
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple Miscarriages Are Associated with the Risk of Ovarian Cancer: Results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Show others...
2012 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5, p. e37141-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While the risk of ovarian cancer clearly reduces with each full-term pregnancy, the effect of incomplete pregnancies is unclear. We investigated whether incomplete pregnancies (miscarriages and induced abortions) are associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. This observational study was carried out in female participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). A total of 274,442 women were followed from 1992 until 2010. The baseline questionnaire elicited information on miscarriages and induced abortions, reproductive history, and lifestyle-related factors. During a median follow-up of 11.5 years, 1,035 women were diagnosed with incident epithelial ovarian cancer. Despite the lack of an overall association (ever vs. never), risk of ovarian cancer was higher among women with multiple incomplete pregnancies (HR >= 4vs.0: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.20-2.70; number of cases in this category: n = 23). This association was particularly evident for multiple miscarriages (HR >= 4vs.0: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.06-3.73; number of cases in this category: n = 10), with no significant association for multiple induced abortions (HR >= 4vs.0: 1.46, 95% CI: 0.68-3.14; number of cases in this category: n = 7). Our findings suggest that multiple miscarriages are associated with an increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer, possibly through a shared cluster of etiological factors or a common underlying pathology. These findings should be interpreted with caution as this is the first study to show this association and given the small number of cases in the highest exposure categories.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-57379 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0037141 (DOI)000305343500064 ()
Available from: 2012-07-17 Created: 2012-07-16 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lundin, E., Wirgin, I., Lukanova, A., Afanasyeva, Y., Krogh, V., Axelsson, T., . . . Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A. (2012). Selected polymorphisms in sex hormone-related genes, circulating sex hormones and risk of endometrial cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, 36(5), 445-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selected polymorphisms in sex hormone-related genes, circulating sex hormones and risk of endometrial cancer
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 445-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The role of estrogen and progesterone in the development of endometrial cancer is well documented. Few studies have examined the association of genetic variants in sex hormone-related genes with endometrial cancer risk. Methods: We conducted a case-control study nested within three cohorts to examine the association of endometrial cancer risk with polymorphisms in hormone-related genes among 391 cases (92% postmenopausal at diagnosis) and 712 individually-matched controls. We also examined the association of these polymorphisms with circulating levels of sex hormones and SHBG in a cross-sectional analysis including 596 healthy postmenopausal women at blood donation (controls from this nested case-control study and from a nested case-control study of breast cancer in one of the three cohorts). Results: Adjusting for endometrial cancer risk factors, the A allele of rs4775936 in CYP19 was significantly associated (OR(per allele)=1.22, 95% CI=1.01-1.47, p(trend)=0.04), while the T allele of rs10046 was marginally associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer (OR(per allele)=1.20, 95% CI=0.99-1.45, p(trend)=0.06). PGR rs1042838 was also marginally associated with risk (OR(per allele)=1.25, 95% CI=0.96-1.61, p(trend)=0.09). No significant association was found for the other polymorphisms, i.e. CYP1B1 rs1800440 and rs1056836, UGT1A1 rs8175347, SHBG rs6259 and ESR1 rs2234693. Rs8175347 was significantly associated with postmenopausal levels of estradiol, free estradiol and estrone and rs6259 with SHBG and estradiol. Conclusion: Our findings support an association between genetic variants in CYP19, and possibly PGR, and risk of endometrial cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-57718 (URN)10.1016/j.canep.2012.04.006 (DOI)000309818500017 ()22633539 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-13 Created: 2012-08-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Idahl, A., Lundin, E., Jurstrand, M., Kumlin, U., Elgh, F., Ohlson, N. & Ottander, U. (2011). Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium plasma antibodies in relation to epithelial ovarian tumors. Infectious diseases in obstetrics and gynecology, 2011, 824627
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium plasma antibodies in relation to epithelial ovarian tumors
Show others...
2011 (English)In: Infectious diseases in obstetrics and gynecology, ISSN 1064-7449, E-ISSN 1098-0997, Vol. 2011, p. 824627-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To assess associations of Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium antibodies with epithelial ovarian tumors.

METHODS: Plasma samples from 291 women, undergoing surgery due to suspected ovarian pathology, were analyzed with respect to C. trachomatis IgG and IgA, chlamydial Heat Shock Protein 60-1 (cHSP60-1) IgG and M. genitalium IgG antibodies. Women with borderline tumors (n=12), ovarian carcinoma (n=45), or other pelvic malignancies (n=11) were matched to four healthy controls each.

RESULTS: Overall, there were no associations of antibodies with EOC. However, chlamydial HSP60-1 IgG antibodies were associated with type II ovarian cancer (P=.002) in women with plasma samples obtained >1 year prior to diagnosis (n=7). M. genitalium IgG antibodies were associated with borderline ovarian tumors (P=.01).

CONCLUSION: Chlamydial HSP60-1 IgG and M. genitalium IgG antibodies are in this study associated with epithelial ovarian tumors in some subsets, which support the hypothesis linking upper-genital tract infections and ovarian tumor development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: Wiley-Liss, 2011
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-50088 (URN)10.1155/2011/824627 (DOI)21811380 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-11-24 Created: 2011-11-24 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Clendenen, T. V., Lundin, E., Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A., Koenig, K. L., Berrino, F., Lukanova, A., . . . Arslan, A. A. (2011). Circulating inflammation markers and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 20(5), 799-810
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating inflammation markers and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.
Show others...
2011 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 799-810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Factors contributing to chronic inflammation appear to be associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between circulating levels of inflammation mediators and subsequent risk of ovarian cancer.

Methods: We conducted a case-control study of 230 cases and 432 individually matched controls nested within three prospective cohorts to evaluate the association of prediagnostic circulating levels of inflammation-related biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, TNFα, IL-1Ra, sIL-1RII, sIL-2Ra, sIL-4R, sIL-6R, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2) measured using Luminex xMap technology with risk of ovarian cancer.

Results: We observed a trend across quartiles for IL-2 (ORQ4 vs. Q1: 1.57, 95% CI: 0.98–2.52, P = 0.07), IL-4 (ORQ4 vs. Q1: 1.50, 95% CI: 0.95–2.38, P = 0.06), IL-6 (ORQ4 vs. Q1: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.03–2.58, P = 0.03), IL-12p40 (ORQ4 vs. Q1: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.02–2.51, P = 0.06), and IL-13 (ORQ4 vs. Q1: 1.42, 95% CI: 0.90–2.26, P = 0.11). Trends were also observed when cytokines were modeled on the continuous scale for IL-4 (P trend = 0.01), IL-6 (P trend = 0.01), IL-12p40 (P trend = 0.01), and IL-13 (P trend = 0.04). ORs were not materially different after excluding cases diagnosed less than 5 years after blood donation or when limited to serous tumors.

Conclusions and Impact: This study provides the first direct evidence that multiple inflammation markers, specifically IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-13, may be associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer, and adds to the evidence that inflammation is involved in the development of this disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for Cancer Research, 2011
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-44267 (URN)10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-1180 (DOI)21467242 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-05-30 Created: 2011-05-30 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Clendenen, T. V., Koenig, K. L., Arslan, A. A., Lukanova, A., Berrino, F., Gu, Y., . . . Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A. (2011). Factors associated with inflammation markers, a cross-sectional analysis. Cytokine, 56(3), 769-778
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with inflammation markers, a cross-sectional analysis
Show others...
2011 (English)In: Cytokine, ISSN 1043-4666, E-ISSN 1096-0023, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 769-778Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Epidemiological studies have reported associations between circulating inflammation markers and risk of chronic diseases. It is of interest to examine whether risk factors for these diseases are associated with inflammation. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to evaluate whether reproductive and lifestyle factors and circulating vitamin D were associated with inflammation markers, including C-reactive protein, cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, TNFα), and cytokine modulators (IL-1RA, sIL-1RII, sIL-2Ra, sIL-4R, sIL-6R, sTNF-R1/R2), among 616 healthy women. We confirmed associations of several inflammation markers with age and BMI. We also observed significantly higher levels of certain inflammation markers in postmenopausal vs. premenopausal women (TNFα, sIL-1RII, sIL-2Ra), with increasing parity (IL-12p40), and with higher circulating 25(OH) vitamin D (IL-13) and lower levels among current users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IL-12p70, and IL-12p40), current smokers (IL-4, IL-13, IL-12p40), and women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer (IL-4, IL-10, IL-13). Our findings suggest that risk factors for chronic diseases (age, BMI, menopausal status, parity, NSAID use, family history of breast and ovarian cancer, and smoking) are associated with inflammation markers in healthy women.

Keywords
C-reactive protein; Cross-sectional studies; Cytokines; Cytokine receptors; Epidemiologic factors
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Cell and Molecular Biology Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-51188 (URN)10.1016/j.cyto.2011.09.013 (DOI)22015105 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Tsilidis, K. K., Allen, N. E., Key, T. J., Dossus, L., Lukanova, A., Bakken, K., . . . Riboli, E. (2011). Oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors and risk of ovarian cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. British Journal of Cancer, 105(9), 1436-1442
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors and risk of ovarian cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Show others...
2011 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 105, no 9, p. 1436-1442Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: It is well established that parity and use of oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but the associations with other reproductive variables are less clear.

METHODS: We examined the associations of oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors with ovarian cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 327 396 eligible women, 878 developed ovarian cancer over an average of 9 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models stratified by centre and age, and adjusted for smoking status, body mass index, unilateral ovariectomy, simple hysterectomy, menopausal hormone therapy, and mutually adjusted for age at menarche, age at menopause, number of full-term pregnancies and duration of oral contraceptive use.

RESULTS: Women who used oral contraceptives for 10 or more years had a significant 45% (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.41-0.75) lower risk compared with users of 1 year or less (P-trend, <0.01). Compared with nulliparous women, parous women had a 29% (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.59-0.87) lower risk, with an 8% reduction in risk for each additional pregnancy. A high age at menopause was associated with a higher risk of ovarian cancer (>52 vs <= 45 years: HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.06-1.99; P-trend, 0.02). Age at menarche, age at first full-term pregnancy, incomplete pregnancies and breastfeeding were not associated with risk.

CONCLUSION: This study shows a strong protective association of oral contraceptives and parity with ovarian cancer risk, a higher risk with a late age at menopause, and no association with other reproductive factors. British Journal of Cancer (2011) 105, 1436-1442. doi:10.1038/bjc.2011.371 www.bjcancer.com Published online 13 September 2011 (C) 2011 Cancer Research UK

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Harcourt Publishers, 2011
Keywords
reproductive history, oral contraceptive use, ovarian cancer, cohort study
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-49957 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2011.371 (DOI)000296282000028 ()
Available from: 2011-11-24 Created: 2011-11-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications