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Eriksson, Jessica
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Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Raza-Ullah, T. & Eriksson, J. (2018). Knowledge sharing and knowledge leakage in dyadic coopetitive alliances involving SMEs. In: Stavros Sindakis, Panagiotis Theodorou (Ed.), Global opportunities for entrepreneurial growth: coopetition and knowledge dynamics within and across firms (pp. 229-252). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge sharing and knowledge leakage in dyadic coopetitive alliances involving SMEs
2018 (English)In: Global opportunities for entrepreneurial growth: coopetition and knowledge dynamics within and across firms / [ed] Stavros Sindakis, Panagiotis Theodorou, Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018, p. 229-252Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we empirically investigate an important question of "how does knowledge sharing and knowledge leakage impact the alliance performance in dyadic coopetitive alliance settings that involve small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs)." Taking the perspective of the focal SME to address this question, we posit that while knowledge sharing positively associates with alliance performance, inadvertent knowledge leakage is negatively related to performance. We further postulate that under the conditions of high knowledge leakage, the positive impacts of knowledge sharing on performance would be reduced. Our structural model results based on a survey of 186 SMEs in the high-tech and knowledge-intensive industries in Sweden show support for two of the hypothesized relation- ships. More specically, the results show that knowledge sharing has a positive effect on alliance performance but knowledge leakage has an insignificant direct effect on performance. However, knowledge leakage plays a negative moderating role on the relationship between knowledge sharing and performance. We contribute by demonstrating the effects of knowledge sharing and leakage in under-researched but important dyadic one-to-one coopetitive alliances involving SMEs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2018
Keywords
Knowledge sharing, knowledge leakage, alliance performance, coopetition, SMEs
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143110 (URN)9781787145023 (ISBN)9781787145016 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-12-17 Created: 2017-12-17 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Stål, H. I., Bonnedahl, K. J. & Eriksson, J. (2015). Micro-level translation of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction – policy meets industry in the Swedish agricultural sector. Journal of Cleaner Production, 103, 629-639
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Micro-level translation of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction – policy meets industry in the Swedish agricultural sector
2015 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 103, p. 629-639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is an urgent challenge for mankind. However, as aggregate emissions continue to rise, necessary changes in industrial practices are lagging behind. The article addresses this discrepancy by exploring how the issue of GHG reduction is channeled from policy to industry, in one of the more GHG intensive sectors, agriculture. We adopt the translation perspective to analyze and discuss how the climate issue travels between contexts. Our study explores the activities involved as advisors, functioning as translating agents within Swedish agri-policy, inform producers about the issue of GHG reduction. The study sheds new light on the effectiveness of mitigation policy in promoting practice change and illustrates how translation is an analytical framework suitable for studying this within different industries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Mitigation policy, Translation, Sustainable agriculture, Greenhouse gas reduction, Climate change
National Category
Business Administration Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97017 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.11.054 (DOI)000356990800060 ()
Available from: 2014-12-09 Created: 2014-12-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Stål, H., Bonnedahl, K. J. & Eriksson, J. (2014). The challenge of introducing low-carbon industrial practices: institutional entrepreneurship in the agri-food sector. European Management Journal, 32(2), 203-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The challenge of introducing low-carbon industrial practices: institutional entrepreneurship in the agri-food sector
2014 (English)In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 203-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contemporary agricultural practices account for a significant share of greenhouse gas emissions. Inspired by the emergent literature on institutional entrepreneurship, we seek to explore mechanisms that affect an actor’s propensity to act in ways that imply suggesting and promoting emission-reducing practice changes. As influences originating outside the organizational field are assumed to constitute such mechanisms, the paper explores their role through a case study of a project run by a public agency. Unlike extant theory, results show that the agency’s propensity to act is not necessarily enhanced by extra-field influences but that such influences also limit the scope for suggesting change that challenges existing industrial practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Institutional entrepreneurship, Divergent change, Institutional logics, Organizational field, extra-field influences, Climate change, Low-carbon practices, Agriculture
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80280 (URN)10.1016/j.emj.2013.06.005 (DOI)000334002800004 ()s2.0-84897598378 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-09-14 Created: 2013-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Stål, H., Eriksson, J. & Bonnedahl, K. J. (2013). Translating GHG reduction: Case studies from the Swedish agricultural sector. In: Proceedings of the 19th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference – 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa: . Paper presented at 19th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference, Stellenbosch , South Africa, 1-3 July, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translating GHG reduction: Case studies from the Swedish agricultural sector
2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the 19th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference – 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa, 2013Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Justification of the paper

Reducing GHG emissions is a fundamental part of the transition to a sustainable society. However, necessary changes in industrial practices are lagging behind as emissions, in the aggregate, continue to rise (World Bank 2012; UNEP, 2012). This paper addresses the discrepancy between needed and actual changes in industrial practices by exploring how the issue of GHG reduction is channelled through policy to industrial producers in a sector of relative importance: Swedish agriculture. We depart from the translation model which sets out to explain how entities, e.g., issues, ideas, practices and problematizations travel within and between contexts (Sahlin & Wedlin, 2008). Our application of the translation  model sheds new light on the attempt to understand inertia in climate change-related practice change and should provide researchers and decision makers, particularly within policy, with new information.    

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore how translation of the issue of GHG reduction affects the meaning of industrial practice. Following Zilber (2002; 2006; cf. Hardy and Maguire, 2009) we consider the shared meanings that underpin practice to be of pivotal importance to explain practice change. Thus we suggest that how or if this issue will spur practice change depends on how translation affects such meanings.

Theoretical framework

The translation model Somewhat simplified, translation assumes that a) entities change as they travel within and between contexts, b) the activities of translating agents are central for this and c) the process never starts nor stops but over time results in taken-for-granted simplifications (Jensen, Sandstrom, & Helin, 2009). Thus it is not mainly the advantages of a particular entity or the power and prestige of some original source (e.g. IPCC) that explain spread but rather the efforts of a multitude of translating agents that: “may act in many different ways, letting the token drop, or modifying it, or deflecting it, or betraying it, or adding to it, or appropriating it” (Latour, 1986: 267).

In applying this model to (agricultural) practice and practice change, we follow Hardy & Maguire (2009; cf. Zilber, 2002; 2006) who stresses the pivotal role of the shared meanings that underpin practice. Seen from this perspective, an emerging issue such as reduction of GHG emissions, could introduce radical change in practices through accompanying problematizations, e.g., claims, arguments, stories, that challenge the legitimacy of the practices prevailing in an industry (Maguire & Hardy, 2009).

Results and conclusions

Our results stem from two case studies exploring how the issue of GHG reduction is channeled through Swedish agro-policy. Our cases show how translation results in new meanings for GHG reduction as well as current agro-policy and practice. However, changes occur mainly at the level of discourse rather than at the level of practice. The argument of “biological complexities”, rendering agricultural emissions special and more difficult to reduce, takes on a status as a taken-for-granted truth that precludes substantial emission cuts and radical practice changes. Framing GHG reduction as concerning efficiency in agricultural practices reconciles possible opposing interests and protects the legitimacy of existing practice. Subsequently, arguments for radical practice changes are weakened.  

Implications for Just Transitions

The results shed light on some of the reasoning that explains inertia in transitions to a sustainable production in advanced nations. It is troublesome if advanced nations, e.g., Sweden, by reducing a complex issue to a matter of efficiency of production, refrain from assuming responsibility and making required radical changes. Further, results illustrate the limitations of the eco-modernist principles that currently guide policy making, especially in addressing global issues e.g., climate change. Such principles effectively preclude discussions of equity and fairness in terms of how much emission a sector and its producers have capacity for. 

Keywords
sustainable production, translation, climate change, agriculture, practice
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79731 (URN)
Conference
19th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference, Stellenbosch , South Africa, 1-3 July, 2013
Available from: 2013-08-29 Created: 2013-08-29 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, J., Biedenbach, G. & Marell, A. (2012). Perception of opportunities from an infrastructure investment: investigating the effects of institutional thickness, innovativeness and local embeddedness. In: Book of Abstracts, RENT XXVI – Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ECSB.. Paper presented at RENT XXVI – Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ECSB, EMLYON Business School, Lyon, France, November 22-23..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perception of opportunities from an infrastructure investment: investigating the effects of institutional thickness, innovativeness and local embeddedness
2012 (English)In: Book of Abstracts, RENT XXVI – Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ECSB., 2012Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The main purpose of this paper is to explore organizations’ perception of opportunities as a consequence of an infrastructure investment. More specifically, the study investigates the effects of organizations’ perception of institutional thickness, innovativeness, and local embeddedness on perception of opportunities. The study reports on investments made in a new railway in a Swedish peripheral region. The sample included organizations from different economic sectors located in seven selected municipalities. The data was analyzed by using structural equation modeling. The results indicate that activities supporting institutional thickness have a positive effect on perception of opportunities. In addition, organizations characterized by high levels of innovativeness and local embeddedness are more likely to perceive positively opportunities arising from an infrastructure investment.

Keywords
Perception of opportunities, institutional thickness, innovativeness, local embeddedness, infrastructure investment
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61830 (URN)
Conference
RENT XXVI – Research in Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ECSB, EMLYON Business School, Lyon, France, November 22-23.
Available from: 2012-11-26 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hamilton, I. & Eriksson, J. (2011). Influence strategies in shareholder engagement: a case study of all Swedish national pension funds. Journal of sustainable Finance & Investment, 1(1), 44-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence strategies in shareholder engagement: a case study of all Swedish national pension funds
2011 (English)In: Journal of sustainable Finance & Investment, ISSN 2043-0795, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 44-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Investors spend money and resources trying to reduce the environmental, social and governance risks in companies they own. If unattended, these risks may cause reputational damage not only to the portfolio firm but also to its owner. In this article, we study five Swedish national pension funds and the influence strategies used in shareholder engagement. Knowledge about influence strategies is important because successful shareholder engagements can lead to more sustainable corporate behaviour and a lower risk to the investor. In addition to the traditional power and legitimacy dependencies that have been reported as influential in deciding stakeholder salience, our findings reveal five additional factors useful for determining influence strategies in shareholder engagement. We provide a conceptual model showing how these factors interlink with choices of influence strategies, offering a practical use of this study. Stakeholder theory has been used as our theoretical frame of reference, based on existing influence strategy literature using a stakeholder–firm perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Earthscan, 2011
Keywords
case study, ESG directive, influence strategy, pension funds, reputation risk, responsible investment, shareholder
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-39778 (URN)10.3763/jsfi.2010.0006 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-02-08 Created: 2011-02-08 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Arbuthnott, A., Eriksson, J., Thorgren, S. & Wincent, J. (2011). Reduced opportunities for regional renewal: The role of rigid threat responses among a region's established firms. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 23(7-8), 603-635
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced opportunities for regional renewal: The role of rigid threat responses among a region's established firms
2011 (English)In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 23, no 7-8, p. 603-635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article illustrates how opportunities for regional renewal in a peripheral region may be reduced by rigid threat responses undertaken by established firms operating within traditional regional industry. In an inductive case study of new biorefinery industry initiatives in a region where traditional pulp-and-paper and forestry industry was in decline, we used primary and secondary data to outline how a set of new industry players who created innovative ways of using existing regional infrastructures and resources sparked rigid threat responses among established firms from the struggling traditional industry. Established industry firms framed new industry initiatives as threats, and responded by (1) reducing new industry actors' possibilities for new business development, (2) engaging in entrenched resistance, (3) creating collaborative illusions and (4) undermining the fundamentals of the new industry. Consequently, this study contributes to existing literature by proposing the potential of applying the threat-rigidity thesis on a regional level. This is achieved by illustrating that conflicting behaviours between new and established regional industry actors constrain opportunities for regional renewal in a peripheral region. As such, relevant directions for future research and policy implications are outlined.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2011
Keywords
biorefinery, industry emergence, legitimacy, localized resources, peripheral region, regional renewal, Sweden, threat rigidity
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-46803 (URN)10.1080/08985621003792996 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-09-14 Created: 2011-09-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Bonnedahl, K. J. & Eriksson, J. (2011). The role of discourse in the quest for low-carbon economic practices: A case of standard development in the food sector. European Management Journal, 29(3), 165-180
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of discourse in the quest for low-carbon economic practices: A case of standard development in the food sector
2011 (English)In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 165-180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores a collaborative initiative aiming to set standards for low-carbon practices in the Swedish food sector. Examining stakeholders’ comments and considerations during formative stages of standard development, the process is explained in terms of how it is influenced by discursive activity. Findings illustrate diverging assumptions and interests, but also how science partly bridges economic and ecological perspectives. However, while more critical arguments serve to validate the initiative, the resulting compromise does not question the canon of market discourse, including consumer sovereignty and the legitimacy of established economic interests. When acknowledging the role of consumers and mainstream business as causes to climate change, voluntary initiatives such as our case could, nevertheless, influence discourse through the spread of knowledge and awareness, and finally facilitate change in practices and acceptance for stricter regulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
Keywords
Climate change, Discourse, Sustainability, Deep structures, Environmental standards, Labelling, Food sector, Stakeholder interaction
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-38422 (URN)10.1016/j.emj.2010.10.008 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-12-14 Created: 2010-12-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Thorgren, S., Wincent, J. & Eriksson, J. (2011). Too small or too large to trust your partners in multipartner alliances?: The role of effort in initiating generalized exchanges. Scandinavian Journal of Management, 27(1), 99-112
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Too small or too large to trust your partners in multipartner alliances?: The role of effort in initiating generalized exchanges
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 99-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article describes how smaller and larger firms face difficulties in establishing trust in multipartner alliances. Using survey data from a sample of 141 firms engaged in such alliances, we examine a curvilinear relationship between firm size and trust. Our results suggest an inverted U-shaped relationship between firm size and the degree to which a firm develops trust in partners. We also establish that effort to establish generalized exchanges is important for trust building. Specifically, we notice the inverted U-shape to be particularly prominent among firms that do not make the effort to establish generalized exchanges, which implies that smaller and larger firms depend upon concerted effort to establish generalized exchanges in developing high levels of trust in alliance partners. This has implications for explaining important influences on trust building in social exchange systems.

Keywords
Firm size, Trust, Generalized exchanges, Alliance, Multipartner, Social categorization
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-38421 (URN)10.1016/j.scaman.2010.11.001 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-12-14 Created: 2010-12-14 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, M., Eriksson, J. & Wincent, J. (2010). Co-opetition dynamics – an outline for further inquiry. Competitiveness Review: An International Journal, 20(2), 194-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-opetition dynamics – an outline for further inquiry
2010 (English)In: Competitiveness Review: An International Journal, ISSN 1059-5422, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 194-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to conceptually develop the understanding of co-opetitiondynamics and to enhance the conceptual clarity of co-opetition by developing a definition based onprevious research efforts.Design/methodology/approach – This conceptual paper integrates various approaches to theconcept co-opetition into a definition that holds for co-opetitive interactions across multiple levels.Different co-opetitive interactions and the resulting dynamics are discussed by drawing uponcompetition and cooperation theories. The paper concludes with an agenda for further research onco-opetition dynamics.Findings – The paper outlines how different types of co-opetitive interactions result in archetypicalsituations where the dynamics of co-opetition are present as well as where the dynamics of co-opetitionare missing due to a lack of balance between cooperation and competition. It notes four co-opetitiveforces: over-embedding, distancing, confronting, and colluding. These four forces drive developmenttowards situations without dynamics.Originality/value – This paper provides a conceptual understanding of co-opetition dynamics andwill reveal that in order to adequately account for co-opetition dynamics, a definition of co-opetitionmust analytically separate the cooperative and the competitive interaction inherent in co-opetition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Ltd, 2010
Keywords
Competitive strategy, Strategic alliances
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-32875 (URN)10.1108/10595421011029893 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-03-30 Created: 2010-03-30 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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