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Wiberg, Britt
Publications (10 of 66) Show all publications
Wiberg, M. & Wiberg, B. (2019). The screens of our time: on "time" - implications for screen time research. In: Lídia Oliveira (Ed.), Managing screen time in an online society: (pp. 122-145). Hershey: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The screens of our time: on "time" - implications for screen time research
2019 (English)In: Managing screen time in an online society / [ed] Lídia Oliveira, Hershey: IGI Global, 2019, p. 122-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite the increasing interest in understanding screen time and its e ects, there are very few papers published on how the notion of "screen time" is conceptualized – both in terms of what "time" refers to in this context and in terms of what a "screen" denotes nowadays. In an attempt to contribute to this lack of theoretical grounding, the authors outline four theoretical grounds for understanding time. Further, they suggest that the notion of "screen" needs to be problematized in similar ways. In this chapter, the authors illustrate how the four di erent conceptualizations of "time" in relation to this broader understanding of screens open up for a new range of studies of "screen time", and they suggest that this conceptualization is necessary in order to move toward.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hershey: IGI Global, 2019
Series
Advances in Human and Social Aspects of Technology (AHSAT), ISSN 2328-1316, E-ISSN 2328-1324
Keywords
Screen time
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
human-computer interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165371 (URN)10.4018/978-1-5225-8163-5.ch006 (DOI)9781522581635 (ISBN)9781522581642 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-11-21 Created: 2019-11-21 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
Åström, E., Seif, A., Wiberg, B. & Carelli, M. G. (2018). Getting "stuck" in the future or the past: Relationships between dimensions of time perspective, executive functions, and repetitive negative thinking in anxiety. Psychopathology, 51, 362-370
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Getting "stuck" in the future or the past: Relationships between dimensions of time perspective, executive functions, and repetitive negative thinking in anxiety
2018 (English)In: Psychopathology, ISSN 0254-4962, E-ISSN 1423-033X, Vol. 51, p. 362-370Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aim: Anxiety disorders are associated with impairments in several aspects of cognitive processing. In this study we investigated three such aspects, i.e., time perspective, repetitive negative thinking (worry and rumination),and executive functioning, in persons with anxiety disorders compared to healthy controls and examined the influence of negative past and negative future time perspective and executive functioning on worry and rumination.

Method: Thirty-six psychiatric outpatients with anxiety disorders (mean age = 30.83, SD = 11.74; 30 females and 6 males) and 44 healthy controls (mean age = 28.89, SD = 9.54; 24 females and 20 males) completed inventories of time perspective and repetitive negative thinking, and tasks measuring executive functioning (shifting and inhibition).

Results: The groups (patient vs. control) differed significantly on all time perspective dimensions (past, present, and future), with largest effect sizes observed for negative past and negative future. Regression analyses with executive functioning, negative past, and negative future time perspectives as predictors, and worry and rumination as outcomes, showed that negative past time perspective was the best predictor for rumination, whereas negative future time perspective more strongly predicted worry. Executive functioning was not a significant predictor of either worry or rumination.

Conclusions: Individuals with anxiety disorders demonstrated systematic biases in all time perspective dimensions, particularly negative past and negative future time perspective, which was further related to worry and rumination. Thus, interventions targeting temporal focus may be one way of reducing repetitive negative thinking. A major limitation of this study was the use of a cross-section design. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2018
Keywords
Anxiety, Anxiety disorders, Time perspective, Executive functions, Repetitive negative thinking, Worry, Rumination
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Clinical Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146263 (URN)10.1159/000494882 (DOI)000459549500002 ()30522113 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-650
Note

Originally included in thesis in manuscript form

Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, B., Sircova, A., Wiberg, M. & Carelli, M. G. (2017). Balanced time perspective: developing empirical profile and exploring its stability over time. In: Aleksandra Kostić, Derek Chadee (Ed.), Time perspective: theory and practice (pp. 63-95). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balanced time perspective: developing empirical profile and exploring its stability over time
2017 (English)In: Time perspective: theory and practice / [ed] Aleksandra Kostić, Derek Chadee, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 63-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Balanced time perspective (BTP) is characterized by flexible switching between a person's past, present and future time orientations, depending on situational demands, personal resources, experiences, and social evaluations. The present study aimed to explore the psychological characteristics of people with a BTP profile and attain a deeper understanding of the BTP construct. Seven people with BTP profiles were investigated using in-depth interviews, self-report instruments, and a projective test. By testing the participants on two occasions within an 18-month interval, we investigated the stability of BTP. Analyses showed that participants were aware of the "now" and had a synchronicity between the present and the past, and also between the present and the future. Results indicated a degree of temporal stability in the BTP profile and that people's interpretations and interactions within the surrounding context of events influences their time perspectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
Keywords
Time perspective, BTP
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Clinical Psychology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-142601 (URN)10.1057/978-1-137-60191-9_4 (DOI)9781137601902 (ISBN)9781137601919 (ISBN)
Projects
Time perspective
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2012-650
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-11-13Bibliographically approved
Gezelius, C., Wahlund, B., Carlsson, L. & Wiberg, B. (2016). Adolescent patients with eating disorders and their parents: a study of self-image and outcome at an intensive outpatient program. Eating and Weight Disorders, 21(4), 607-616
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent patients with eating disorders and their parents: a study of self-image and outcome at an intensive outpatient program
2016 (English)In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 607-616Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose The main aim of this clinical study was to explore how adolescent patients with eating disorders and their parents report their perceived self-image, using Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB), before and after treatment at an intensive outpatient program. Another aim was to relate the self-image of the young patients to the outcome measures body mass index (BMI) and Children's Global Assessment Scale (C-GAS) score.

Methods A total of 93 individuals (32 adolescents, 34 mothers, and 27 fathers) completed the SASB self-report questionnaire before and after family-based treatment combined with an individual approach at a child and youth psychiatry day care unit. The patients were also assessed using the C-GAS, and their BMI was calculated.

Results The self-image (SASB) of the adolescent patients was negative before treatment and changed to positive after treatment, especially regarding the clusters self-love (higher) and self-blame (lower). A positive correlation between change in self-love and in C-GAS score was found, which rose significantly. Increased self-love was an important factor, explaining a variance of 26 %. BMI also increased significantly, but without any correlation to change in SASB. The patients' fathers exhibited low on the cluster self-protection. Mothers' profiles were in line with a non-clinical group.

Conclusions Results indicate that the self-image of adolescent patients change from negative to positive alongside with a mainly positive outcome of the ED after treatment. Low self-protection according to SASB among fathers suggests the need for greater focus on their involvement.

Keywords
Adolescents, Eating disorders, Outcome, Parents, Self-image
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129680 (URN)10.1007/s40519-016-0286-4 (DOI)000388596700006 ()27170194 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-13 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Stolarski, M., Wiberg, B. & Osin, E. (2015). Assessing Temporal Harmony: The Issue of a balanced Time Perspective. In: Stolarski, M., Fieualaine, N., van Beek, W. (Ed.), Time Perspective Theory; Review, Research and Application: Essays in Honor of Philip G. Zimbardo (pp. 57-71). Springer-Verlag New York
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Temporal Harmony: The Issue of a balanced Time Perspective
2015 (English)In: Time Perspective Theory; Review, Research and Application: Essays in Honor of Philip G. Zimbardo / [ed] Stolarski, M., Fieualaine, N., van Beek, W., Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, p. 57-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter provides a detailed analysis of one of the central concepts of Zimbardo and Boyd’s time perspective theory: the balanced time perspective. Since their earliest works in the area, the issue of temporal harmony attracted attention of researchers and practitioners alike, especially within the field of positive psychology. Here, we provide a deepened consideration of the nature of balanced time perspective, its origins, and consequences. Moreover, we review the existing empirical operationalizations of temporal harmony, both those derived from the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and those created independently from it. We analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each method and reflect on future directions in research on the balanced time perspective issue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2015
Keywords
balanced time perspective (BTP), ZTPI, S-ZTPI
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94831 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-07368-2_3 (DOI)978-3-319-07367-5 (ISBN)978-3-319-07368-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-10-17 Created: 2014-10-17 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wiberg, B. & Åström, E. (2015). Betydelsen av kunskap och medvetenhet om subjektiv tidsuppfattning hos individer vid bedömning, behandling och i grupper och organisationer. Seniorpsykologen, 18(3), 12-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Betydelsen av kunskap och medvetenhet om subjektiv tidsuppfattning hos individer vid bedömning, behandling och i grupper och organisationer
2015 (Swedish)In: Seniorpsykologen, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-124922 (URN)
Available from: 2016-08-30 Created: 2016-08-30 Last updated: 2020-04-09Bibliographically approved
Carelli, M. G., Wiberg, B. & Åström, E. (2015). Broadening the TP Profile: Future Negative Time Perspective (1ed.). In: Stolarski, Maciej, Fieulaine, Nicolas, van Beek, Wessel (Ed.), Time Perspective Theory; Review, Research and Application: Essays in Honor of Philip G. Zimbardo (pp. 87-97). New York: Springer-Verlag New York
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Broadening the TP Profile: Future Negative Time Perspective
2015 (English)In: Time Perspective Theory; Review, Research and Application: Essays in Honor of Philip G. Zimbardo / [ed] Stolarski, Maciej, Fieulaine, Nicolas, van Beek, Wessel, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, 1, p. 87-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The importance of the future as an arena for planning, self-regulation and achievement has been of considerable interest in past research. The majority of this research suggests that future-oriented thinking has considerable benefits for psychological adjustment and wellbeing. The future is nevertheless not only a temporal space for goal-setting and positive expectations, it may also be associated with fear, uncertainty and anxiety, which may ultimately have detrimental effects on both mental and physical health. Here we present the outline for the Swedish ZTPI (S-ZTPI) which extends the original ZTPI by separating the Future dimension into two sub-factors: The Future Positive scale and the Future Negative scale. We argue that separating the future into two separate dimensions thus comprehending both a positive and a negative valence of the future, adds important information regarding association between future time perspective and subjective well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2015 Edition: 1
Keywords
time perspective, ZTPI, S-ZTPI, future negative time perspective
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95398 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-07368-2_5 (DOI)9783319073675 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-10-29 Created: 2014-10-29 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Sircova, A., van de Vijver, F. J. R., Osin, E., Milfont, T. L., Fieulaine, N., Kislali-Erginbilgic, A., . . . Wiberg, B. (2015). Time perspectives profiles of cultures. In: Maciej Stolarski, Nicolas Fieulaine, Wessel van Beek (Ed.), Time perspective theory; review, research and application : essays in Honor of Philip G. Zimbardo (pp. 169-187). Cham, Switzeland:: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time perspectives profiles of cultures
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2015 (English)In: Time perspective theory; review, research and application : essays in Honor of Philip G. Zimbardo / [ed] Maciej Stolarski, Nicolas Fieulaine, Wessel van Beek, Cham, Switzeland:: Springer , 2015, p. 169-187Chapter in book (Refereed) [Artistic work]
Abstract [en]

This chapter summarises some results of the International Time Perspective Research Project, which is a collaborative cross-cultural study of time perspective carried out in 24 countries. The highlights of structural equivalence assessment study are presented, showing the cross-cultural invariance of 36 items of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) scale. The associations between country-level ZTPI scores and other culture-level indicators, including the Human Development Index and Hofstede cultural dimensions, are presented and discussed. Using hierarchical cluster analysis, five distinct profiles of time perspective were found (future-oriented, present-oriented, balanced, moderately fatalistic, and negative), and significant differences in the prevalence of these profiles across cultures were found. Implications and perspectives for future research are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham, Switzeland:: Springer, 2015
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-97000 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-07368-2_11 (DOI)978-3-319-07368-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-12-08 Created: 2014-12-08 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Sircova, A., van de Vijver, F., Osin, E., Milfont, T., Fieulaine, N., Kislali-Erginbilgic, A., . . . Boyd, J. (2014). A global look at time: a 24-country study of the equivalence of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory. SAGE Open (4), 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A global look at time: a 24-country study of the equivalence of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory
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2014 (English)In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, no 4, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, we assess the structural equivalence of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) across 26 samples from 24 countries (N = 12,200). The ZTPI is proven to be a valid and reliable index of individual differences in time perspective across five temporal categories: Past Negative, Past Positive, Present Fatalistic, Present Hedonistic, and Future. We obtained evidence for invariance of 36 items (out of 56) and also the five-factor structure of ZTPI across 23 countries. The short ZTPI scales are reliable for country-level analysis, whereas we recommend the use of the full scales for individual-level analysis. The short version of ZTPI will further promote integration of research in the time perspective domain in relation to many different psycho-social processes.

Keywords
Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI, time perspective, equivalence, cross-cultural research
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-93812 (URN)10.1177/2158244013515686 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-10-01 Created: 2014-10-01 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Åström, E., Carelli, M. G. & Wiberg, B. (2014). Exploring multiple concepts of psychological time in relation to anxiety. Personality and Individual Differences, 60, S11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring multiple concepts of psychological time in relation to anxiety
2014 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 60, p. S11-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Time is a central part of human experience. Different timing functions are vital for adequate behavioral outcomes, and individual differences in time perspective can be associated with both well-being and mental distress.The aim of this study is to discuss several aspects of temporal processing in relation to anxiety. Specifically, our findings suggest that moderate anxiety is associated with systematic biases in Future Negative- and Past Negative time perspectives. Further, in exploring the possible underlying mechanisms that mediate time perspective in anxiety, preliminary data on the relationship between aspects of cognitive control (inhibition), time perspective and anxiety will be presented. The findings will be discussed according to their clinical and theoretical implications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94445 (URN)10.1016/j.paid.2013.07.189 (DOI)
Note

Volume 60, Supplement

Available from: 2014-10-09 Created: 2014-10-09 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
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