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Nordin, Ellinor
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Toots, A., Wiklund, R., Littbrand, H., Nordin, E., Nordström, P., Lundin-Olsson, L., . . . Rosendahl, E. (2019). The Effects of Exercise on Falls in Older People With Dementia Living in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 20(7), 835-842
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effects of Exercise on Falls in Older People With Dementia Living in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2019 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 835-842Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To investigate exercise effects on falls in people with dementia living in nursing homes, and whether effects were dependent on sex, dementia type, or improvement in balance. A further aim was to describe the occurrence of fall-related injuries.

DESIGN: A cluster-randomized controlled trial.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The Umeå Dementia and Exercise study was set in 16 nursing homes in Umeå, Sweden and included 141 women and 45 men, a mean age of 85 years, and with a mean Mini-Mental State Examination score of 15.

INTERVENTION: Participants were randomized to the high-intensity functional exercise program or a seated attention control activity; each conducted 2-3 times per week for 4 months.

MEASURES: Falls and fall-related injuries were followed for 12 months (after intervention completion) by blinded review of medical records. Injuries were classified according to severity.

RESULTS: During follow-up, 118(67%) of the participants fell 473 times in total. At the interim 6-month follow-up, the incidence rate was 2.7 and 2.8 falls per person-year in exercise and control group, respectively, and at 12-month follow-up 3.0 and 3.2 falls per person-year, respectively. Negative binomial regression analyses indicated no difference in fall rate between groups at 6 or 12 months (incidence rate ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-1.7, P = .838 and incidence rate ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.6, P = .782, respectively). No differences in exercise effects were found according to sex, dementia type, or improvement in balance. Participants in the exercise group were less likely to sustain moderate/serious fall-related injuries at 12-month follow-up (odds ratio 0.31, 95% CI 0.10-0.94, P = .039).

CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: In older people with dementia living in nursing homes, a high-intensity functional exercise program alone did not prevent falls when compared with an attention control group. In high-risk populations, in which multimorbidity and polypharmacy are common, a multifactorial fall-prevention approach may be required. Encouraging effects on fall-related injuries were observed, which merits future investigations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Alzheimer disease, Falls, dementia, exercise, fractures, residential facilitie
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-159680 (URN)10.1016/j.jamda.2018.10.009 (DOI)000472596100008 ()30503589 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-01-4Swedish Research Council, K2009-69X-21299-01-1Swedish Research Council, K2009-69P-21298-04-4Swedish Research Council, K2014-99X-22610-01-6Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareVårdal FoundationThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the DementedVästerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Fjellman-Wiklund, A., Nordin, E., Skelton, D. A. & Lundin-Olsson, L. (2016). Reach the Person behind the Dementia Physical Therapists' Reflections and Strategies when Composing Physical Training. PLoS ONE, 11(12), Article ID e0166686.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reach the Person behind the Dementia Physical Therapists' Reflections and Strategies when Composing Physical Training
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0166686Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dementia is a disease characterized by cognitive impairment and physical decline that worsens over time. Exercise is one lifestyle factor that has been identified as a potential means of reducing or delaying progression of the symptoms of dementia, maximizing function and independence. The purpose of this study was to explore physical therapists' (PTs) experiences and reflections on facilitating high-intensity functional exercise with older people living with dementia, in residential care home settings. The study used a qualitative design based on interviews, individually or in small groups, with seven PTs engaged as leaders in the training of older people with dementia. The interviews were analyzed with a modified Grounded Theory method with focus on constant comparisons. To increase trustworthiness the study used triangulation within investigators and member checking. The core category "Discover and act in the moment-learn over time" reflects how the PTs continuously developed their own learning in an iterative process. They built on previous knowledge to communicate with residents and staff and to tailor the high intensity training in relation to each individual at that time point. The category "Be on your toes" highlights how the PTs searched for sufficient information about each individual, before and during training, by eliciting the person's current status from staff and by interpreting the person's body language. The category "Build a bond with a palette of strategies" describes the importance of confirmation to build up trust and the use of group members and the room to create an interplay between exercise and social interaction. These findings highlight the continuous iterative process of building on existing knowledge, sharing and reflecting, being alert to any alterations needed for individuals that day, communication skills (both with residents and staff) and building a relationship and trust with residents in the effective delivery of high intensity functional exercise to older people living with dementia in care settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public library science, 2016
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-129728 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0166686 (DOI)000389482700035 ()
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pohl, P., Ahlgren, C., Nordin, E., Lundquist, A. & Lundin-Olsson, L. (2015). Gender perspective on fear of falling using the classification of functioning as the model. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(3), 214-222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender perspective on fear of falling using the classification of functioning as the model
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2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 214-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Purpose: To investigate associations between fear of falling (FOF) and recurrent falls among women and men, and gender differences in FOF with respect to International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Methods: Community-dwelling people (n = 230, 75-93 years, 72% women) were included and followed 1 year regarding falls. Data collection included self-reported demographics, questionnaires, and physical performance-based tests. FOF was assessed with the question "Are you afraid of falling?". Results were discussed with a gender relational approach. Results: At baseline 55% women (n = 92) and 22% men (n = 14) reported FOF. During the follow-up 21% women (n = 35) and 30% men (n = 19) experienced recurrent falls. There was an association between gender and FOF (p = 0.001), but not between FOF and recurrent falls (p = 0.79), or between gender and recurrent falls (p = 0.32). FOF was related to Personal factors and Activity and Participation. The relationship between FOF and Personal factors was in opposite directions for women and men. Conclusions: Results did not support the prevailing paradigm that FOF increases rate of recurrent falls in community-dwelling people, and indicated that the answer to "Are you afraid of falling?" might be highly influenced by gendered patterns.

Implications for Rehabilitation

The question "Are you afraid of falling?" has no predictive value when screening for the risk of falling in independent community-dwelling women or men over 75 years of age.

Gendered patterns might influence the answer to the question "Are you afraid of falling?" Healthcare personnel are recommended to be aware of this when asking older women and men about fear of falling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Falls, fear, gender, ICF, older people
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96717 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.914584 (DOI)000348789500004 ()24786969 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-27 Created: 2014-11-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Pohl, P., Nordin, E., Lundquist, A., Bergström, U. & Lundin-Olsson, L. (2014). Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years: a prospective long-term follow-up study. BMC Geriatrics, 14(1), 120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community-dwelling older people with an injurious fall are likely to sustain new injurious falls within 5 years: a prospective long-term follow-up study
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2014 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 120-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Fall-related injuries in older people are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Self-reported fall events in the last year is often used to estimate fall risk in older people. However, it remains to be investigated if the fall frequency and the consequences of the falls have an impact on the risk for subsequent injurious falls in the long term. The objective of this study was to investigate if a history of one single non-injurious fall, at least two non-injurious falls, or at least one injurious fall within 12 months increases the risk of sustaining future injurious falls.

METHODS: Community-dwelling individuals 75-93 years of age (n = 230) were initially followed prospectively with monthly calendars reporting falls over a period of 12 months. The participants were classified into four groups based on the number and type of falls (0, 1, ≥2 non-injurious falls, and ≥1 injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to a hospital emergency department). The participants were then followed for several years (mean time 5.0 years ±1.1) regarding injurious falls requiring a visit to the emergency department. The Andersen-Gill method of Cox regression for multiple events was used to estimate the risk of injurious falls.

RESULTS: During the long-term follow-up period, thirty per cent of the participants suffered from at least one injurious fall. Those with a self-reported history of at least one injurious fall during the initial 12 months follow-up period showed a significantly higher risk for sustaining subsequent injurious falls in the long term (hazard ratio 2.78; 95% CI, 1.40-5.50) compared to those with no falls. No other group showed an increased risk.

CONCLUSIONS: In community-dwelling people over 75 years of age, a history of at least one self-reported injurious fall severe enough to cause a visit to the emergency department within a period of 12 months implies an increased risk of sustaining future injurious falls. Our results support the recommendations to offer a multifactorial fall-risk assessment coupled with adequate interventions to community-dwelling people over 75 years who present to the ED due to an injurious fall.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
accidental falls,  older adults,  risk factors,  community-dwelling,  fall prediction
National Category
Physiotherapy Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96716 (URN)10.1186/1471-2318-14-120 (DOI)000346030500005 ()25407714 (PubMedID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2014-11-27 Created: 2014-11-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Nordin, E., Moe-Nilssen, R., Ramnemark, A. & Lundin-Olsson, L. (2010). Changes in step-width during dual-task walking predicts falls. Gait & Posture, 32(1), 92-97
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in step-width during dual-task walking predicts falls
2010 (English)In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 92-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to evaluate whether gait pattern changes between single- and dual-task conditions were associated with risk of falling in older people. Dual-task cost (DTC) of 230 community living, physically independent people, 75 years or older, was determined with an electronic walkway. Participants were followed up each month for 1 year to record falls. Mean and variability measures of gait characteristics for 5 dual-task conditions were compared to single-task walking for each participant. Almost half (48%) of the participants fell at least once during follow-up. Risk of falling increased in individuals where DTC for performing a subtraction task demonstrated change in mean step-width compared to single-task walking. Risk of falling decreased in individuals where DTC for carrying a cup and saucer demonstrated change compared to single-task walking in mean step-width, mean step-time, and step-length variability. Degree of change in gait characteristics related to a change in risk of falling differed between measures. Prognostic guidance for fall risk was found for the above DTCs in mean step-width with a negative likelihood ratio of 0.5 and a positive likelihood ratio of 2.3, respectively. Findings suggest that changes in step-width, step-time, and step-length with dual tasking may be related to future risk of falling. Depending on the nature of the second task, DTC may indicate either an increased risk of falling, or a protective strategy to avoid falling.

Keywords
Balance; Inter-active gait; Step-width; Dual-task costs; Falls
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41369 (URN)10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.03.012 (DOI)000279581000018 ()20399100 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-23 Created: 2011-03-23 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Rosendahl, E., Gustafson, Y., Nordin, E., Lundin-Olsson, L. & Nyberg, L. (2008). A randomised controlled trial of fall prevention by a high-intensity functional exercise program for older people in residential care facilities. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, 20(1), 67-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomised controlled trial of fall prevention by a high-intensity functional exercise program for older people in residential care facilities
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2008 (English)In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Falls are particularly common among older people living in residential care facilities. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a high-intensity functional exercise program in reducing falls in residential care facilities.

METHODS: Participants comprised 191 older people, 139 women and 52 men, who were dependent in activities of daily living. Their mean+/-SD score on the Mini-Mental State Examination was 17.8+/-5.1 (range 10-30). Participants were randomized to a high-intensity functional exercise program or a control activity, consisting of 29 sessions over 3 months. The fall rate and proportion of participants sustaining a fall were the outcome measures, subsequently analysed using negative binominal analysis and logistic regression analysis, respectively.

RESULTS: During the 6-month follow-up period, when all participants were compared, no statistically significant differences between groups were found for fall rate (exercise group 3.6 falls per person years [PY], control group 4.6 falls per PY), incidence rate ratio (95% CI) 0.82 (0.49-1.39), p=0.46, or the proportion of participants sustaining a fall (exercise 53%, control 51%), odds ratio (95% CI) 0.95 (0.52-1.74), p=0.86. A subgroup interaction analysis revealed that, among participants who improved their balance during the intervention period, the exercise group had a lower fall rate than the control group (exercise 2.7 falls per PY, control 5.9 falls per PY), incidence rate ratio (95% CI) 0.44 (0.21-0.91), p=0.03.

CONCLUSIONS: In older people living in residential care facilities, a high-intensity functional exercise program may prevent falls among those who improve their balance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Milan: Editrice Kurtis SRL, 2008
Keywords
Accidental falls, aged, exercise, frail elderly, randomized controlled trials, residential facilities
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5075 (URN)10.1007/BF03324750 (DOI)000253726700011 ()18283231 (PubMedID)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2006-04-18 Created: 2006-04-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordin, E., Rosendahl, E., Lindelöf, N., Jensen, J. & Lundin-Olsson, L. (2008). Prognostic validity of the Timed Up-and-Go test, a modified Get Up-and-Go test, staff's global judgement and fall history in evaluating fall risk in residential care facilities. Age and Ageing, 37(4), 442-448
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prognostic validity of the Timed Up-and-Go test, a modified Get Up-and-Go test, staff's global judgement and fall history in evaluating fall risk in residential care facilities
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2008 (English)In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 442-448Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-3677 (URN)
Available from: 2008-11-24 Created: 2008-11-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Moe-Nilssen, R., Nordin, E. & Lundin-Olsson, L. (2007). Criteria for evaluation of measurement properties of clinical balance measures for use in fall prevention studies. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Criteria for evaluation of measurement properties of clinical balance measures for use in fall prevention studies
2007 (English)In: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7494 (URN)doi:10.1111/j.1365-2753.2007.00839.x (DOI)
Available from: 2008-01-10 Created: 2008-01-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Rosendahl, E., Lindelöf, N., Littbrand, H., Yifter-Lindgren, E., Nordin, E., Lundin olsson, L., . . . Nyberg, L. (2007). High-intensity functional exercise program for older people dependent in ADL: an RCT evaluating the effects on physical functions and falls.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-intensity functional exercise program for older people dependent in ADL: an RCT evaluating the effects on physical functions and falls
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2007 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7377 (URN)
Available from: 2008-01-09 Created: 2008-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Nordin, E., Rosendahl, E. & Lundin-Olsson, L. (2006). Timed "Up & Go" test: reliability in older people dependent in activities of daily living - focus on cognitive state.. Physical Therapy, 86(5), 646-655
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Timed "Up & Go" test: reliability in older people dependent in activities of daily living - focus on cognitive state.
2006 (English)In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 646-655Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living, Age Factors, Aged, Aged; 80 and over, Cognition, Cognition Disorders/diagnosis, Data Interpretation; Statistical, Female, Geriatric Assessment, Homes for the Aged, Humans, Locomotion, Logistic Models, Male, Mental Status Schedule, Sex Factors, Walking
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7064 (URN)16649889 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-01-03 Created: 2008-01-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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