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Brändström, Anders
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Vu, X.-S., Jiang, L., Brändström, A. & Elmroth, E. (2017). Personality-based Knowledge Extraction for Privacy-preserving Data Analysis. In: K-CAP 2017 - Proceedings of the Knowledge Capture Conference: . Paper presented at K-CAP 2017: The 9th International Conference on Knowledge Capture, Austin, Texas, December 4-6, 2017. Austin, TX, USA: ACM Digital Library, Article ID 45.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personality-based Knowledge Extraction for Privacy-preserving Data Analysis
2017 (English)In: K-CAP 2017 - Proceedings of the Knowledge Capture Conference, Austin, TX, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2017, article id 45Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we present a differential privacy preserving approach, which extracts personality-based knowledge to serve privacy guarantee data analysis on personal sensitive data. Based on the approach, we further implement an end-to-end privacy guarantee system, KaPPA, to provide researchers iterative data analysis on sensitive data. The key challenge for differential privacy is determining a reasonable amount of privacy budget to balance privacy preserving and data utility. Most of the previous work applies unified privacy budget to all individual data, which leads to insufficient privacy protection for some individuals while over-protecting others. In KaPPA, the proposed personality-based privacy preserving approach automatically calculates privacy budget for each individual. Our experimental evaluations show a significant trade-off of sufficient privacy protection and data utility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Austin, TX, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2017
Keywords
Differential Privacy, Privacy-preserving Data Analysis
National Category
Language Technology (Computational Linguistics)
Research subject
Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143228 (URN)10.1145/3148011.3154479 (DOI)978-1-4503-5553-7 (ISBN)
Conference
K-CAP 2017: The 9th International Conference on Knowledge Capture, Austin, Texas, December 4-6, 2017
Projects
Privacy-aware data federation
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Poveda, A., Chen, Y., Brändström, A., Engberg, E., Hallmans, G., Johansson, I., . . . Franks, P. W. (2017). The heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in cardiometabolic traits. Diabetologia, 60(3), 442-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in cardiometabolic traits
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2017 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 442-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims/hypothesis Little is known about the heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in humans. We therefore screened multiple cardiometabolic traits to assess the probability that they are influenced by genotype-environment interactions.

Methods Fourteen established environmental risk exposures and 11 cardiometabolic traits were analysed in the VIKING study, a cohort of 16,430 Swedish adults from 1682 extended pedigrees with available detailed genealogical, phenotypic and demographic information, using a maximum likelihood variance decomposition method in Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines software.

Results All cardiometabolic traits had statistically significant heritability estimates, with narrow-sense heritabilities (h (2)) ranging from 24% to 47%. Genotype-environment interactions were detected for age and sex (for the majority of traits), physical activity (for triacylglycerols, 2 h glucose and diastolic BP), smoking (for weight), alcohol intake (for weight, BMI and 2 h glucose) and diet pattern (for weight, BMI, glycaemic traits and systolic BP). Genotype-age interactions for weight and systolic BP, genotype-sex interactions for BMI and triacylglycerols and genotype-alcohol intake interactions for weight remained significant after multiple test correction.

Conclusion/hypothesis Age, sex and alcohol intake are likely to be major modifiers of genetic effects for a range of cardiometabolic traits. This information may prove valuable for studies that seek to identify specific loci that modify the effects of lifestyle in cardiometabolic disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2017
Keywords
Cardiometabolic traits, Environment, Extended pedigrees, Gene, Heritability, Interaction, VIKINGstudy
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-133524 (URN)10.1007/s00125-016-4184-0 (DOI)000394462100010 ()28004149 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-20 Created: 2017-05-20 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Kurbasic, A., Poveda, A., Chen, Y., Ågren, Å., Engberg, E., Hu, F. B., . . . Franks, P. W. (2014). Gene-Lifestyle Interactions in Complex Diseases: Design and Description of the GLACIER and VIKING Studies. Current nutrition reports, 3(4), 400-411
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene-Lifestyle Interactions in Complex Diseases: Design and Description of the GLACIER and VIKING Studies
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2014 (English)In: Current nutrition reports, ISSN 2161-3311, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 400-411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most complex diseases have well-established genetic and non-genetic risk factors. In some instances, these risk factors are likely to interact, whereby their joint effects convey a level of risk that is either significantly more or less than the sum of these risks. Characterizing these gene-environment interactions may help elucidate the biology of complex diseases, as well as to guide strategies for their targeted prevention. In most cases, the detection of gene-environment interactions will require sample sizes in excess of those needed to detect the marginal effects of the genetic and environmental risk factors. Although many consortia have been formed, comprising multiple diverse cohorts to detect gene-environment interactions, few robust examples of such interactions have been discovered. This may be because combining data across studies, usually through meta-analysis of summary data from the contributing cohorts, is often a statistically inefficient approach for the detection of gene-environment interactions. Ideally, single, very large and well-genotyped prospective cohorts, with validated measures of environmental risk factor and disease outcomes should be used to study interactions. The presence of strong founder effects within those cohorts might further strengthen the capacity to detect novel genetic effects and gene-environment interactions. Access to accurate genealogical data would also aid in studying the diploid nature of the human genome, such as genomic imprinting (parent-of-origin effects). Here we describe two studies from northern Sweden (the GLACIER and VIKING studies) that fulfill these characteristics.

National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-96711 (URN)10.1007/s13668-014-0100-8 (DOI)25396097 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-27 Created: 2014-11-27 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Blomstedt, Y., Sahlén, K. G., Nilsson, I., Sundström, A. & Brändström, A. (2013). Elderly care in Swedish welfare state: implications of the population ageing. In: Yushi Li (Ed.), Global aging issues and policies: understanding the importance of comprehending and studying the aging process (pp. 226-244). Springfield: Charles C. Thomas Publisher Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elderly care in Swedish welfare state: implications of the population ageing
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2013 (English)In: Global aging issues and policies: understanding the importance of comprehending and studying the aging process / [ed] Yushi Li, Springfield: Charles C. Thomas Publisher Ltd., 2013, p. 226-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springfield: Charles C. Thomas Publisher Ltd., 2013
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-85522 (URN)978-0-398-08866-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-02-05 Created: 2014-02-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Brändström, A. & Norrhem, S. (2012). Inledning. In: Anders Brändström & Svante Norrhem (Ed.), Människan, arbetet och historien: en vänbok till professor Tom Ericsson (pp. 5-7). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inledning
2012 (Swedish)In: Människan, arbetet och historien: en vänbok till professor Tom Ericsson / [ed] Anders Brändström & Svante Norrhem, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2012, p. 5-7Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2012
Series
Historiska studier: skrifter från Umeå universitet ; 3
Keywords
Historia
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71148 (URN)978-91-7459-473-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-05-20 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Brändström, A. & Norrhem, S. (Eds.). (2012). Människan, arbetet och historien: en vänbok till professor Tom Ericsson (1ed.). Umeå: Umeå universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Människan, arbetet och historien: en vänbok till professor Tom Ericsson
2012 (Swedish)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå universitet, 2012. p. 339 Edition: 1
Series
Historiska studier: skrifter från Umeå universitet ; 3
National Category
History and Archaeology
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-59772 (URN)978-91-7459-473-7 (ISBN)
Note

Hela kapitel på tyska och engelska förekommer, samt sammanfattningar/abstracts på engelska.

Available from: 2012-09-25 Created: 2012-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Bonita, R., Brändström, A. & Malmberg, G. (2011). Linnaeus: Alive and well. Global Health Action, 4, 5760-2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linnaeus: Alive and well
2011 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 4, p. 5760-2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Co-Action Publishing, 2011
Keywords
aging, cognitive changes, database, demographic trends, lifecourse, longitudinal data, multi-disciplinary research
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-38972 (URN)10.3402/gha.v4i0.5760 (DOI)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Projects
Ageing and Living Conditions
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2006-21576-36119-66
Available from: 2011-01-12 Created: 2011-01-12 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Brändström, A. (2007). Ageing: a cross-cutting research and policy challenge. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 35(3), 225-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ageing: a cross-cutting research and policy challenge
2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 225-227Article in journal (Other academic) Published
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5750 (URN)10.1080/14034940701367896 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-03-07 Created: 2008-03-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Brändström, A., Edvinsson, S., Lindkvist, M. & Rogers, J. (2007). Clustering across generations: a comparative analysis of infant mortality in 19th century Sweden. In: ESSHC Conference in Lisbon, 26 February-1 March, 2008: . Paper presented at The seventh European Social Science History Conference, Lisbon, 26 February - 1 March 2008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clustering across generations: a comparative analysis of infant mortality in 19th century Sweden
2007 (English)In: ESSHC Conference in Lisbon, 26 February-1 March, 2008, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Many studies in the past have emphasized the positive correlation between infant mortality and fertility, but how this operates remain unclear. In this paper, we investigate these interdependent processes using data from the Demographic Data base at Ume{\aa} University. More specifically, we have data from regions in the northern part of Sweden, starting in the fifteenth century and ending around the year 1900. In an earlier paper, we have studied the intergenerational aspects of infant mortality and in this paper we incorporate fertility. We investigate the interaction between the two processes and how patterns are tranferred from generation to generation.

Keywords
demografi
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5753 (URN)
Conference
The seventh European Social Science History Conference, Lisbon, 26 February - 1 March 2008
Available from: 2008-05-15 Created: 2008-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Brändström, A., Vikström, P. & Edvinsson, S. (2006). Longitudinal databases - sources for analyzing the life course: Characteristics, difficulties and possibilities. History and computing, 14(1 and 2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal databases - sources for analyzing the life course: Characteristics, difficulties and possibilities
2006 (English)In: History and computing, ISSN 0957-0144, Vol. 14, no 1 and 2Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7063 (URN)
Available from: 2007-04-16 Created: 2007-04-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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