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Wiesinger, Birgitta
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Wiesinger, B., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Eklund, A., Wänman, A. & Hellström, F. (2019). Multimodal Sensory Stimulation of the Masseter Muscle Reduced Precision but Not Accuracy of Jaw-Opening Movements. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 13, Article ID 1083.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multimodal Sensory Stimulation of the Masseter Muscle Reduced Precision but Not Accuracy of Jaw-Opening Movements
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 13, article id 1083Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A functional integration between the trigeminal and craniocervical sensorimotor systems has been demonstrated, with simultaneous jaw and head-neck movements during jaw opening-closing. We previously showed that pain induction in the masseter muscle increased the relative contribution of the neck component of integrated jaw-neck movements. Induced pain or manipulation of proprioception by vibration did not affect accuracy during a jaw-opening task in men. It is not known how multimodal sensory stimulation, with a combination of pain induction and vibration, affects jaw-opening accuracy and precision. The aim was to investigate how jaw-neck movements, and specifically accuracy and precision of jaw-opening, are affected during concomitant nociceptive and proprioceptive stimulation of the masseter muscle. Twenty-one healthy men performed jaw-opening to a target position, defined as 75% of individual maximum jaw opening, during control (Ctr), vibration of masseter muscles (Vib), pain induction in the masseter (Pain), and concomitant vibration and pain induction in the masseter muscle (VibPain). Simultaneous jaw and head movements were recorded with an optoelectronic system and amplitudes calculated for each jaw opening-closing cycle. Accuracy of jaw movements was defined as the achievement of the target position. Precision of jaw movements was defined as the cycle-to-cycle variability from the mean of cycles 2-10 (coefficient of variation, CV). Differences between the trials were analyzed with Friedman's test, Dunn's test, and Benjamini-Hochberg correction. There were no significant differences between the trials for jaw movement amplitudes. For head movements, amplitudes for cycles 2-10 were larger during Pain compared to Ctr and Vib (both p = 0.034), and larger during VibPain compared to Ctr (p = 0.034) and Vib (p = 0.035). There were no differences in accuracy of jaw movements between the trials. For precision of jaw movements, the cycle-to-cycle variability was larger during VibPain compared to Ctr (p = 0.027) and Vib (p = 0.018). For integrated jaw-neck motor strategy, there was a difference between pain and non-pain trials, but no differences between unimodal and multimodal stimulation trials. For achievement of jaw-opening to a target position, the results show no effect on accuracy, but a reduced precision of jaw movements during combined proprioceptive and nociceptive multimodal stimulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
Keywords
sensorimotor control, multimodal sensory stimulation, accuracy, precision, jaw movements, head-neck movements, pain, vibration
National Category
Physiotherapy Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-166456 (URN)10.3389/fnins.2019.01083 (DOI)000497579400003 ()31649503 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074161116 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-17 Created: 2019-12-17 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Kumar, A., Tanaka, Y., Takahashi, K., Grigoriadis, A., Wiesinger, B., Svensson, P. & Trulsson, M. (2019). Vibratory stimulus to the masseter muscle impairs the oral fine motor control during biting tasks. Journal of Prosthodontic Research, 63(3), 354-360
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vibratory stimulus to the masseter muscle impairs the oral fine motor control during biting tasks
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Prosthodontic Research, ISSN 1883-1958, E-ISSN 2212-4632, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 354-360Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To investigated the effect of vibratory stimulus on masseter muscles during oral fine motor biting tasks.

Methods: Sixteen healthy individuals (age: 24.5 ± 2.4 years) participated in experiment I during which the participants were asked to “hold and split” half a roasted peanut placed on a force transducer with their front teeth. The participant performed ten series with ten trials of the “hold and split” behavioral task while vibratory stimulus was applied on the masseter muscle every alternate series. Further, fourteen participants participated (age: 25.2 ± 4.8 years) in experiment II during which they performed a series each of the behavioral task at baseline, an adjusted baseline without and with vibration as well as with and without visual feedback. Hold and split forces along with the variability of hold force and duration and force rate during the split were measured.

Results: The results of the study showed an increase in the magnitude of the hold force (P = 0.002), force rate during the split (P < 0.001) and a significant decrease in the duration of split (P < 0.001) due to the vibratory stimulus. However, there was no significant effect of the vibratory stimulus on the variability of hold forces (P = 0.879) or mean split force (P = 0.683) during the “hold and split” behavioral task. The results of experiment II also showed an increase in hold force due to the vibratory stimulus (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Vibratory stimulus to the masseter muscles impairs the oral force control during a standardized biting task and provide further insight into the sensorimotor regulation of the masticatory system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Periodontal mechanoreceptors, Variability, Visual feedback, Proprioception, Masseter muscle vibration
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-161920 (URN)10.1016/j.jpor.2018.10.011 (DOI)000475429600017 ()30833186 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062216565 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Marklund, S., Storm Mienna, C., Wahlström, J., Englund, E. & Wiesinger, B. (2019). Work ability and productivity among dentists: associations with musculoskeletal pain, stress, and sleep. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work ability and productivity among dentists: associations with musculoskeletal pain, stress, and sleep
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Work ability can be measured by the work ability index (WAI), and work-related questions measuring productivity loss in terms of quality and quantity of work. Dentists have high occupational risk of musculoskeletal pain and the exposure of ergonomic strain is already high during dental education. The aim was to evaluate work ability and productivity among dentists, and to identify gender differences and associations with sleep, stress, and reported frequent pain.

Methods: The study population comprised 187 dentists (123 women and 64 men) who had been working as dentists between 5 and 12 years. Participants completed a questionnaire regarding sleep, stress, presence of pain at different sites, work ability assessed by WAI, and productivity in terms of quality and quantity of work.

Results: Poor sleep quality and high level of stress were reported by 31% and 48.1% of participants, respectively, with no gender differences and no association with age. The prevalence of frequent pain ranged 6.4–46.5% with shoulders being the most prevalent site. Thirty-three percent reported reduced work ability. Poor sleep, high amount of stress, and multi-site pain were associated with decreased work ability.

Conclusions: A high prevalence of pain was shown among dentists. Decreased work ability in terms of productivity loss was associated with poor sleep quality, high amount of stress, and multi-site pain. Preventive actions at the workplace should promote good musculoskeletal health, and measures taken, both individual and organizational, to minimize the risk of high, persistent stress and work-related pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Dentist, Pain, Productivity, Sleep, Stress, Work ability
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164959 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01478-5 (DOI)000492568400001 ()31654126 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-19
Häggman-Henrikson, B., Wiesinger, B. & Wänman, A. (2018). The effect of supervised exercise on localized TMD pain and TMD pain associated with generalized pain. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 76(1), 6-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of supervised exercise on localized TMD pain and TMD pain associated with generalized pain
2018 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 6-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of a supervised exercise program in patients with localized/regional temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and with TMD associated with generalized pain.

Material and methods: Consecutively referred patients with localized/regional TMD pain (n = 56; 46 women and 10 men, mean age 44 years) and TMD associated with generalized pain (n = 21; 21 women, mean age 41 years) participated. Patients underwent a 10-session structured supervised exercise program over 10-20 weeks that included relaxation, and coordination and resistance training of the jaw and neck/shoulders. The outcomes were jaw pain intensity on the Numerical Rating Scale, endurance time for jaw opening and protrusion against resistance and chewing, and effect of pain on daily activities.

Results: After the exercise program, a reduction in jaw pain was reported by the local (p = .001) and general (p = .011) pain groups. There were no significant differences in jaw pain intensity between the groups, before (p = .062) or after treatment (p =.121). Endurance time increased for both groups for jaw opening/protrusion (both p <. 001) and chewing (both p = .002). The effect of jaw pain on daily activities decreased after exercise compared to baseline for both the local (p < .001) and general (p = .008) pain groups.

Conclusions: Supervised exercise can reduce TMD pain and increase capacity in patients with TMD. The results suggest that activation of the jaw motor system with exercise has a positive effect in patients with localized/regional TMD pain and TMD associated with generalized pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
exercise therapy, orofacial pain, resistance training, temporomandibular disorders
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146242 (URN)10.1080/00016357.2017.1373304 (DOI)000426893500001 ()
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wiesinger, B., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Hellström, F., Englund, E. & Wänman, A. (2016). Does induced masseter muscle pain affect integrated jaw-neck movements similarly in men and women?. European Journal of Oral Sciences, 124(6), 546-553
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does induced masseter muscle pain affect integrated jaw-neck movements similarly in men and women?
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Oral Sciences, ISSN 0909-8836, E-ISSN 1600-0722, Vol. 124, no 6, p. 546-553Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Normal jaw opening-closing involves simultaneous jaw and head-neck movements. We previously showed that, in men, integrated jaw-neck movements during jaw function are altered by induced masseter muscle pain. The aim of this study was to investigate possible sex-related differences in integrated jaw-neck movements following experimental masseter muscle pain. We evaluated head-neck and jaw movements in 22 healthy women and 16 healthy men in a jaw opening-closing task. The participants performed one control trial and one trial with masseter muscle pain induced by injection of hypertonic saline. Jaw and head movements were registered using a three-dimensional optoelectronic recording system. There were no significant sex-related differences in jaw and head movement amplitudes. Head movement amplitudes were significantly greater in the pain trials for both men and women. The proportional involvement of the neck motor system during jaw movements increased in pain trials for 13 of 16 men and for 18 of 22 women. Thus, acute pain may alter integrated jaw-neck movements, although, given the similarities between men and women, this interaction between acute pain and motor behaviour does not explain sex differences in musculoskeletal pain in the jaw and neck regions.

Keywords
head movements, jaw, masseter muscle, neck, pain
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127274 (URN)10.1111/eos.12315 (DOI)000387755000005 ()27781338 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-04 Created: 2016-11-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wiesinger, B., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Wänman, A., Lindkvist, M. & Hellström, F. (2014). Jaw-opening accuracy is not affected by masseter muscle vibration in healthy men. Experimental Brain Research, 232(11), 3501-3508
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Jaw-opening accuracy is not affected by masseter muscle vibration in healthy men
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2014 (English)In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 232, no 11, p. 3501-3508Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a functional integration between the jaw and neck regions with head extension-flexion movements during jaw-opening/closing tasks. We recently reported that trigeminal nociceptive input by injection of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle altered this integrated jaw-neck function during jaw-opening/closing tasks. Thus, in jaw-opening to a predefined position, the head-neck component increased during pain. Previous studies have indicated that muscle spindle stimulation by vibration of the masseter muscle may influence jaw movement amplitudes, but the possible effect on the integrated jaw-neck function is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of masseter muscle vibration on jaw-head movements during a continuous jaw-opening/closing task to a target position. Sixteen healthy men performed two trials without vibration (Control) and two trials with bilateral masseter muscle vibration (Vibration). Movements of the mandible and the head were registered with a wireless three-dimensional optoelectronic recording system. Differences in jaw-opening and head movement amplitudes between Control and Vibration, as well as achievement of the predefined jaw-opening target position, were analysed with Wilcoxon's matched pairs test. No significant group effects from vibration were found for jaw or head movement amplitudes, or in the achievement of the target jaw-opening position. A covariation between the jaw and head movement amplitudes was observed. The results imply a high stability for the jaw motor system in a target jaw-opening task and that this task was achieved with the head-neck and jaw working as an integrated system.

Keywords
Integrated jaw-neck function; Masseter muscle vibration; Proprioception; Jaw-opening accuracy; Motor strategy
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-94534 (URN)10.1007/s00221-014-4037-3 (DOI)000343916400012 ()25059909 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-10-13 Created: 2014-10-13 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Wiesinger, B., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Hellström, F. & Wänman, A. (2013). Experimental masseter muscle pain alters jaw-neck motor strategy. European Journal of Pain, 17(7), 995-1004
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental masseter muscle pain alters jaw-neck motor strategy
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 995-1004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A functional integration between the jaw and neck regions has been demonstrated during normal jaw function. The effect of masseter muscle pain on this integrated motor behaviour in man is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of induced masseter muscle pain on jaw-neck movements during a continuous jaw opening-closing task.

Methods: Sixteen healthy men performed continuous jaw opening-closing movements to a target position, defined as 75% of the maximum jaw opening. Each subject performed two trials without pain (controls) and two trials with masseter muscle pain, induced with hypertonic saline as a single injection. Simultaneous movements of the mandible and the head were registered with a wireless optoelectronic three-dimensional recording system. Differences in movement amplitudes between trials were analysed with Friedman's test and corrected Wilcoxon matched pairs test.

Results: The head movement amplitudes were significantly larger during masseter muscle pain trials compared with control. Jaw movement amplitudes did not differ significantly between any of the trials after corrected Wilcoxon tests. The ratio between head and jaw movement amplitudes was significantly larger during the first pain trial compared with control.

Conclusions: Experimental masseter muscle pain in humans affected integrated jaw-neck movements by increasing the neck component during continuous jaw opening-closing tasks. The findings indicate that pain can alter the strategy for jaw-neck motor control, which further underlines the functional integration between the jaw and neck regions. This altered strategy may have consequences for development of musculoskeletal pain in the jaw and neck regions.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79235 (URN)10.1002/j.1532-2149.2012.00263.x (DOI)000321204100007 ()
Available from: 2013-09-05 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Marklund, S., Wiesinger, B. & Wänman, A. (2010). Reciprocal influence on the incidence of symptoms in trigeminally and spinally innervated areas. European Journal of Pain, 14(4), 366-371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reciprocal influence on the incidence of symptoms in trigeminally and spinally innervated areas
2010 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 366-371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Temporomandibular disorders (TMD), headaches, and spinal pain show co-morbidity and may therefore influence each other. The hypothesis tested is that the presence of any of these conditions will increase the risk of onset of new symptoms within a 2-year period. The study population comprised 280 dental students, who were examined three times at 12-month intervals. The incidence was calculated for a 2-year period, based on subjects without the defined symptom at baseline. Each participant was classified into five different case-control groups, representing incidence cases or no incidence (controls) of: (1) nonpain TMD symptoms; (2) jaw pain; (3) headaches; (4) spinal pain; and (5) TMD pain. Presence of headaches and of spinal pain and signs and symptoms of TMD at baseline were used as independent variables in logistic regression analyses, controlling for age and sex. Incidence cases with TMD pain reported spinal pain at baseline significantly more often than the controls, and were mostly women. Incidence cases with headaches and incidence cases with jaw pain significantly more often had signs of TMD and reported spinal pain at baseline, compared to controls. Incidence cases with nonpain TMD symptoms or spinal pain significantly more often presented with signs of TMD at baseline. Our findings show that pain and dysfunction in trigeminally innervated areas and pain in spinally innervated areas mutually predict the onset of new symptoms in dental students, indicating common pathophysiological mechanisms and individual vulnerability. This may be of importance in risk assessment and treatment planning of individuals with musculoskeletal pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2010
Keywords
Incidence, Temporomandibular disorders, Headaches, Spinal pain, Reciprocal influence, Prospective cohort
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Odontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-25688 (URN)10.1016/j.ejpain.2009.06.004 (DOI)000277881000006 ()
Available from: 2009-09-07 Created: 2009-08-28 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Wiesinger, B., Malker, H., Englund, E. & Wänman, A. (2009). Does a dose-response relation exist between spinal pain and temporomandibular disorders?. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 10, 28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does a dose-response relation exist between spinal pain and temporomandibular disorders?
2009 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 10, p. 28-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to test whether a reciprocal dose-response relation exists between frequency/severity of spinal pain and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). METHODS: A total of 616 subjects with varying severity of spinal pain or no spinal pain completed a questionnaire focusing on symptoms in the jaw, head and spinal region. A subset of the population (n = 266) were sampled regardless of presence or absence of spinal pain. We used two different designs, one with frequency/severity of spinal pain, and the other, with frequency/severity of TMD symptoms as independent variable. All 616 participants were allocated to four groups, one control group without spinal pain and three spinal pain groups. The subjects in the subset were allocated to one control group without TMD symptoms and three TMD groups. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for presence of frequent TMD symptoms in the separate spinal pain groups as well as for frequent spinal pain in the separate TMD groups. RESULTS: The analysis showed increasing ORs for TMD with increasing frequency/severity of spinal pain. We also found increasing ORs for spinal pain with increasing frequency/severity of TMD symptoms. CONCLUSION: This study shows a reciprocal dose-response-like relationship between spinal pain and TMD. The results indicate that these two conditions may share common risk factors or that they may influence each other. Studies on the temporal sequence between spinal pain and TMD are warranted.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-20767 (URN)10.1186/1471-2474-10-28 (DOI)19254384 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-25 Created: 2009-03-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wiesinger, B., Malker, H., Englund, E. & Wänman, A. (2007). Back pain in relation to musculoskeletal disorders in the jaw-face: a matched case-control study. Pain, 131(3), 311-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Back pain in relation to musculoskeletal disorders in the jaw-face: a matched case-control study
2007 (English)In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 131, no 3, p. 311-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Back pain and temporomandibular disorders are both common conditions in the population with influence on the human motor system, but a possible co-morbidity between these conditions has not been fully investigated. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of an association between long-term back pain and pain and/or dysfunction in the jaw-face region. Back pain was defined as pain in the neck, shoulders and/or low back. The study-population comprised 96 cases with long-term back pain and 192 controls without back pain. We used a screening procedure, a questionnaire and a clinical examination of the jaw function. The questionnaire focused on location, frequency, duration, intensity and impact on daily life of symptoms in the jaw-face and back regions. The analysis was conducted on 16 strata, matched by age and sex for case vs. control, using Mantel-Haenszel estimates of matched odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) as well as the corrected Mantel-Haenszel chi(2) test. The overall prevalence of frequent symptoms in the jaw-face region, as reported in the questionnaire, was 47% among cases and 12% among controls. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.0001) with a sevenfold odds ratio (CI: 3.9-13.7). Moderate to severe signs from the jaw region were clinically registered among 49% of the cases and 17% of the controls (P<0.0001, OR: 5.2, CI: 2.9-9.2). The results showed statistically significant associations between long-term back pain and musculoskeletal disorders in the jaw-face and indicate co-morbidity between these two conditions.

Keywords
Back pain; Temporomandibular disorders; Matched case-control study; Co-morbidity; Musculoskeletal disorders; Jaw dysfunction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-20972 (URN)10.1016/j.pain.2007.03.018 (DOI)17459585 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-31 Created: 2009-03-31 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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