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Sandlund, Jonas
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Sandlund, J., Srinivasan, D., Heiden, M. & Mathiassen, S. E. (2017). Differences in motor variability among individuals performing a standardized short-cycle manual task. Human Movement Science, 51, 17-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in motor variability among individuals performing a standardized short-cycle manual task
2017 (English)In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 51, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Motor variability (MV) has been suggested to be a determinant of the risk for developing musculoskeletal disorders in repetitive work. In this study we examined whether individuals consistently differed in the extent of motor variability when performing a standardized short-cycle manual task. On three separate days, arm kinematics was recorded in 14 healthy subjects performing a pipetting task, transferring liquid from a pick-up tube to eight target tubes with a cycle time of 2.8 s. Cycle-to-cycle standard deviations (SD) of a large selection of shoulder and elbow kinematic variables, were processed using principal component analysis (PCA). Thereafter, between-subjects and between-days (within-subject) variance components were calculated using a random effects model for each of four extracted principal components. The results showed that MV differed consistently between subjects (95% confidence intervals of the between-subjects variances did not include zero) and that subjects differed consistently in MV between days. Thus, our results support the notion that MV may be a consistent personal trait, even though further research is needed to verify whether individuals rank consistently in MV even across tasks. If so, MV may be a candidate determinant of the risk of developing fatigue and musculoskeletal disorders in repetitive occupational work. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Kinematics, Repetitive task, Principal component analysis, Day-to-day variability, Between-subjects riability, Individual differences
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-132641 (URN)10.1016/j.humov.2016.10.009 (DOI)000393633800003 ()27821310 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-20 Created: 2017-03-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Aasa, B., Lundström, L., Papacosta, D., Sandlund, J. & Aasa, U. (2014). Do we see the same movement impairments?: the inter-rater reliability of movement tests for experienced and novice physiotherapists. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 16(16), 173-182, Article ID 3.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do we see the same movement impairments?: the inter-rater reliability of movement tests for experienced and novice physiotherapists
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2014 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 16, p. 173-182, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study design: Inter-rater reliability study. Background: Physiotherapists (PTs) use clinical tests including movement tests to identify faulty movement patterns. Aims: To investigate the inter-rater-reliability of active movement tests in the cervical spine, shoulder joint and scapulo-thoracic joint, and to describe the reasons for judgment of a positive test. Methodology: Four PTs, two experienced and two recently educated (novice), rated performance of five movement tests for 36 participants. Twenty-one of the participants were patients under treatment because of neck and/or shoulder problems, while 15 participants declared no problem from this region of the body. All tests were video recorded and the ratings were done by observing the video recordings. First, the PTs judged the tests as negative (the movement being ideally performed) or positive (the movement not being ideally performed). Then, the PTs described why the movements that they judged positive were not being ideally performed, using a predefined protocol, which represented different movement quality aspects. The inter-rater reliability was calculated for each test using Kappa statistics between the two experienced and the two novice PTs, respectively, and between each of the experienced and each of the novice PTs. Major findings: The experienced PTs had a higher inter-rater reliability than the novice PTs. The reasons for considering a movement test being positive differed highly between the (novice) PTs. Principal conclusion: This study supports previous studies concluding that the observation of active movement tests is reliable when assessed by experienced PTs. Novice PTs might benefit from further supervision.

Keywords
examination, motor control, neck pain, shoulder pain, testing
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-92015 (URN)10.3109/21679169.2014.917435 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-08-20 Created: 2014-08-20 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Sandlund, J., Aasa, B., Berglund, L. & Aasa, U. (2012). Classification accuracy of motor control tests of the lumbar spine for subgroups of mechanical low back pain. In: : . Paper presented at International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists (IFOMPT), A Rendez-Vouz of Hands and Minds, September 30 - October 5, 2012, Quebec City, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classification accuracy of motor control tests of the lumbar spine for subgroups of mechanical low back pain
2012 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-136119 (URN)
Conference
International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists (IFOMPT), A Rendez-Vouz of Hands and Minds, September 30 - October 5, 2012, Quebec City, Canada
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Sandlund, J., Röijezon, U., Björklund, M. & Djupsjöbacka, M. (2008). Acuity of goal-directed arm movements to visible targets in chronic neck pain. Paper presented at The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) symposium “Fundamentals of musculoskeletal pain”, on May 7–9, 2007 in Aalborg, Denmark and the PREMUS conference, on August 27–30, 2007 in Boston, USA. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 40(5), 366-374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acuity of goal-directed arm movements to visible targets in chronic neck pain
2008 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate end-point acuity in goal-directed arm movements in subjects with chronic neck pain, while taking the trade-off between speed and accuracy into account, and to evaluate associations between reduced acuity and self-rated characteristics.

Design: Single-blinded, controlled, comparative group study.

Subjects: Forty-five subjects with chronic non-traumatic, non-specific neck pain (n = 24) and whiplash-associated disorders (n = 21). Healthy subjects served as controls (n = 22). The groups were age- and sex-matched.

Methods: Subjects performed fast and accurate pointing movements to a visual target. Group differences in end-point variability, controlled for peak velocity, were evaluated. Associations between end-point variability and self-rated symptoms, functioning, self-efficacy and kinesiophobia were analysed.

Results: End-point acuity, controlled for peak velocity, was reduced for both neck-pain groups. Similar spatial error patterns across all groups indicated no direction-specific reduction. For both neck-pain groups, associations were found between end-point acuity and neck movement deficits, physical functioning and, in whiplash, also balance and pain.

Conclusion: Acuity of goal-directed arm movements can be reduced in chronic neck pain. Associations between acuity and self-rated characteristics support the clinical validity of the results and indicate that impaired neck function contributes to reduced end-point acuity. The results can be of importance for characterization and rehabilitation of neck disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Foundation of Rehabilitation Information, 2008
Keywords
neck pain, whiplash injuries, somatosensory disorders, motor activity, psychomotor performance, proprioception, kinaesthesis, vision
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-3145 (URN)10.2340/16501977-0175 (DOI)18461262 (PubMedID)
Conference
The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) symposium “Fundamentals of musculoskeletal pain”, on May 7–9, 2007 in Aalborg, Denmark and the PREMUS conference, on August 27–30, 2007 in Boston, USA
Note

This paper was presented as a poster at the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) symposium “Fundamentals of musculoskeletal pain”, on May 7–9, 2007 in Aalborg, Denmark and the PREMUS conference, on August 27–30, 2007 in Boston, USA.

Available from: 2008-05-02 Created: 2008-05-02 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Sandlund, J., Djupsjöbacka, M., Ryhed, B., Hamberg, J. & Björklund, M. (2006). Predictive and discriminative value of shoulder proprioception tests for patients with whiplash-associated disorders. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 38(1), 44-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive and discriminative value of shoulder proprioception tests for patients with whiplash-associated disorders
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2006 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 44-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate whether patients suffering from whiplash-associated disorders have impaired shoulder proprioception and whether the acuity of shoulder proprioception is reflected in the patients’ symptoms and self-rated function.

Design: A comparative group design, including a correlation design for the patient group.

Subjects: Patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (n/37) and healthy subjects (n/41). The groups were matched for age and gender.

Methods: All subjects underwent a shoulder proprioception test involving active ipsilateral arm position-matching. Group difference was evaluated by multiple analysis of variance and analysis of variance. The patient group completed questionnaires addressing functioning and health and performed pain ratings. Associations between proprioceptive acuity and selfrated functioning and symptoms were studied by correlation and regression analyses.

Results: The patient group showed significantly lower acuity of shoulder proprioception. Moderate correlations were found between proprioceptive acuity and questionnaire scores representing physical functioning, so that low proprioceptive acuity was associated with low self-rated physical functioning. Scores representing pain-intensity did not correlate with proprioceptive acuity.

Conclusion: The results show that, at the group level, patients with whiplash-associated disorders have impaired shoulder proprioception. The clinical relevance of this finding is strongly supported by the association between shoulder proprioceptive acuity and self-rated functioning in the patient group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2006
Keywords
Adult, Female, Humans, Male, Neck Pain/diagnosis/physiopathology/rehabilitation, Pain Measurement, Posture, Predictive Value of Tests, Prognosis, Proprioception/*physiology, Questionnaires, Range of Motion; Articular/physiology, Recovery of Function, Shoulder Joint/*physiopathology, Whiplash Injuries/diagnosis/*physiopathology/rehabilitation
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-17017 (URN)10.1080/16501970510042847 (DOI)16548086 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-10-25 Created: 2007-10-25 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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