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Dahlgren, Lars
Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Lusey, H., San Sebastian, M., Christianson, M., Dahlgren, L. & Edin, K. E. (2014). Conflicting discourses of church youths on masculinity and sexuality in the context of HIV in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS, 11(1), 84-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conflicting discourses of church youths on masculinity and sexuality in the context of HIV in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
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2014 (English)In: SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS, ISSN 1729-0376, E-ISSN 1813-4424, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Masculinity studies are fairly new and young churchgoers are an under-researched group in the current Congolese church context. In response to this knowledge gap, this paper attempts to explore discourses of young churchgoers from deprived areas of Kinshasa regarding masculinity and sexuality in the era of HIV. A series of 16 semi-structured interviews were conducted with unmarried young churchgoers from the Salvation Army, Protestant and Revival churches. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using discourse analysis. Five main discourses emerged: 'we are aware of the church message on sex', 'young men need sex', 'young women need money', 'to use or not to use condoms' and 'we trust in the church message'. Although all informants knew and heard church messages against premarital sex, many of them were sexually active. The perception was that young men were engaged in sexual activities with multiple partners as a result of sexual motivations surrounding masculinity and sexual potency, while young women sought multiple partners through transactional and intergenerational sex for economic reasons. These sexual practices of young people conflicted with church messages on sexual abstinence and faithfulness. However, a small number of participants challenged current gender norms and suggested alternative ways of being a man or a woman. To elucidate these alternatives, we suggest that church youths and church leaders might take concrete actions to deconstruct misconceptions about being men. In this way, they can possibly enhance a frank and fruitful dialogue on sex, sexuality and gender to promote positive masculinities and constructive partnerships to prevent HIV.

Keywords
masculinity, sexuality, young churchgoers, HIV prevention, gender equality, DR Congo
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91943 (URN)10.1080/17290376.2014.930695 (DOI)000346283000011 ()25000272 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84917739667 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-08-18 Created: 2014-08-18 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, M., Dahlgren, L. & Emmelin, M. (2013). Collective actors as driving forces for mobilizing social capital in a local community: what can be learned for health promotion?. In: Hans Westlund and Kiyoshi Kobayashi (Ed.), Social capital and rural development in the knowledge society : (pp. 273-298). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collective actors as driving forces for mobilizing social capital in a local community: what can be learned for health promotion?
2013 (English)In: Social capital and rural development in the knowledge society / [ed] Hans Westlund and Kiyoshi Kobayashi, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 273-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013
Series
New Horizons in Regional Science series
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-81344 (URN)9781782540595 (ISBN)9781782540601 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-10-07 Created: 2013-10-07 Last updated: 2019-04-08Bibliographically approved
Birkeland, A.-L., Hagglöf, B., Dahlgren, L. & Rydberg, A. (2013). Interprofessional teamwork in Swedish pediatric cardiology: a national exploratory study. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 27(4), 320-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interprofessional teamwork in Swedish pediatric cardiology: a national exploratory study
2013 (English)In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 320-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to describe the nature of pediatric cardiology teams (PCTs) based in Sweden through the use of a mixed methods approach. Questionnaires examining issues about the organization/ways of working, functions/tasks and attitudes were answered by 30 PCTs. Focus group interviews were conducted with six PCTs, selected purposefully by size and location, and information on experiences and attitudes on interprofessional teamwork was explored in depth. Results from the quantitative indicated that in 17 of the teams, where the nurse acted as the central coordinator, there was a positive attitude to the value of teamwork. In the interviews, different problems and needs of improvements were mentioned regarding structure, leadership, presence of physicians in the team as well as the team's mandate. All of the participants, however, agreed that interprofessional teams were required to manage the complexity of the children's care. In conclusion, this study suggests that PCTs need further support to develop structure, leadership and coordination of resources to function in a more effective manner. National plans or recommendations that mandate the organization and working methods of PCTs would be helpful for the ongoing development of PCTs in Sweden.

Keywords
Health and social care, interprofessional care, qualitative method, quantitative method, team work
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-79906 (URN)10.3109/13561820.2013.767224 (DOI)000322288400007 ()
Available from: 2013-09-05 Created: 2013-09-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Persson, M., Winkvist, A., Dahlgren, L. & Mogren, I. (2013). "Struggling with daily life and enduring pain": a qualitative study of the experiences of pregnant women living with pelvic girdle pain. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 13, 111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Struggling with daily life and enduring pain": a qualitative study of the experiences of pregnant women living with pelvic girdle pain
2013 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 13, p. 111-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Few studies have investigated the experiences of living with pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and its impact on pregnant women's lives. To address this gap in knowledge, this study investigates the experiences of women living with PGP during pregnancy. Methods: A purposive sample, of nine pregnant women with diagnosed PGP, were interviewed about their experiences. Interviews were recorded, transcribed to text and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. Results: The core category that evolved from the analysis of experiences of living with PGP in pregnancy was "struggling with daily life and enduring pain". Three properties addressing the actions caused by PGP were identified: i) grasping the incomprehensible; ii) balancing support and dependence and iii) managing the losses. These experiences expressed by the informants constitute a basis for the consequences of PGP: iv) enduring pain; v) being a burden; vi) calculating the risks and the experiences of the informants as vii) abdicating as a mother. Finally, the informants' experiences of the consequences regarding the current pregnancy and any potential future pregnancies is presented in viii) paying the price and reconsidering the future. A conceptual model of the actions and consequences experienced by the pregnant informants living with PGP is presented. Conclusions: PGP during pregnancy greatly affects the informant's experiences of her pregnancy, her roles in relationships, and her social context. For informants with young children, PGP negatively affects the role of being a mother, a situation that further strains the experience. As the constant pain disturbs most aspects of the lives of the informants, improvements in the treatment of PGP is of importance as to increase the quality of life. This pregnancy-related condition is prevalent and must be considered a major public health concern during pregnancy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2013
Keywords
Pelvic girdle pain, Experiences, Pregnancy, Qualitative
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-76268 (URN)10.1186/1471-2393-13-111 (DOI)000319387100001 ()
Available from: 2013-07-08 Created: 2013-07-08 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Birkeland, A.-L., Dahlgren, L., Hägglöf, B. & Rydberg, A. (2011). Breaking bad news: an interview study of paediatric cardiologists. Cardiology in the Young, 21(3), 286-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breaking bad news: an interview study of paediatric cardiologists
2011 (English)In: Cardiology in the Young, ISSN 1047-9511, E-ISSN 1467-1107, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 286-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Technical developments in paediatric cardiology over the last few decades have increased expectations on professionals, demanding of them more emotional competence and communicative ability. The aim of this study was to examine the approach of paediatric cardiologists in informing and communicating with the family of the patient.

Method: A qualitative interview method was first tested in a pilot study with two paediatric cardiologists. There were nine subsequent semi-structured interviews that were carried out with paediatric cardiologists. A researcher performed all the interviews, which were taped, transcribed, decoded, and analysed.

Results: Among paediatric cardiologists, how to break bad news to the family is an important concern, evident in findings regarding the significance of trust and confidence, the use of different emotional positions, and a common ambition to achieve skills to handle the situation. There is a need for reflection, education, and sharing of experiences. The cardiologists desire further development of teamwork and of skills in medical students and residents for delivering bad news.

Conclusions: Doctors are expected to cope with the complexities of diagnoses and decisions, while simultaneously being sensitive to the feelings of the parents, aware of their own emotions, and able to keep it all under control in the context of breaking the bad news to the parents and keeping them informed. These conflicting demands create a need to expand the professional role of the doctor by including more training in emotional competence and communicative ability, beginning in medical school and continuing through consultancy.

Keywords
Counselling; patient relations; medical education; professional role
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-40939 (URN)10.1017/S1047951110001952 (DOI)21272428 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-15 Created: 2011-03-15 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lindström, M., Wulff, M., Dahlgren, L. & Lalos, A. (2011). Experiences of working with induced abortion: focus group discussions with gynaecologists and midwives/nurses. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 25(3), 542-548
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of working with induced abortion: focus group discussions with gynaecologists and midwives/nurses
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 542-548Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:  While there exists an extensive amount of research regarding the medical aspects of abortion, there is a great lack of studies investigating staff's views and experiences of working in abortion services.

Aims:  To elucidate gynaecologists' and midwives'/nurses' experiences, perceptions and interactions working in abortion services, their experiences of medical abortions and abortions performed at the woman's home. An additional aim was to illustrate gynaecologists', midwives' and nurses' visions of their future professional roles within the abortion services.

Method:  Three focus group discussions within each profession were carried out in 1-hour sessions with a total of 25 gynaecologists and 15 midwives/nurses from three different hospitals.

Results:  The content analysis reflected that gynaecologists and midwives/nurses had no doubts about participating in abortions despite the fact that they had experienced complex and difficult situations, such as repeat and late-term abortions. They experienced their work as paradoxical and frustrating but also as challenging and rewarding. However, they were rarely offered ongoing guidance and continuously professional development education. For gynaecologists, as well as midwives/nurses, their experiences and perceptions were strongly linked to the concurrent development of abortion methods. The interaction between the professions was found to be based on great trust in each other's skills.

Conclusions:  In order to promote women's health, gynaecologists' and midwives'/nurses' need for a forum for reflection and ongoing guidance should be acted on. With a higher number of abortions done medically and a higher proportion of home abortions, midwives/nurses will get increased, responsibilities in the abortion services in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2011
Keywords
abortion care, ethical considerations, experience, gynaecologist, focus group discussion, home abortion, interaction, midwife, nurse
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-42138 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00862.x (DOI)21251034 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-04-06 Created: 2011-04-06 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Obando Medina, C., Dahlblom, K., Dahlgren, L., Herrera, A. & Kullgren, G. (2011). I keep my problems to myself: pathways to suicide attempts in Nicaraguan young men. Suicidology Online, 2, 17-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I keep my problems to myself: pathways to suicide attempts in Nicaraguan young men
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2011 (English)In: Suicidology Online, ISSN 2078-5488, E-ISSN 2078-5488, Vol. 2, p. 17-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This qualitative study is an attempt to understand the pathways leading to attempted suicide of young men in León, Nicaragua. Our research is based on in-depth interviews with twelve young men between the ages of 15 and 24 who had recently attempted to take their own life. The analysis is based on a grounded theory approach. The young men who participated in this study had a broadly similar background, insofar as they all came from broken families and had dropped out from school at an early age. They also all faced similar problems, such as unemployment and alcohol abuse. On this basis a model describing the pathways leading to the suicide attempts was constructed based on the informants’ experiences. In all cases the decision to attempt suicide was found to be an expression of frustration with the present conditions of life. Combined with this was the traumatic influence of a troubled childhood within an unloving, unstable family. Attention has been paid to the ambivalent and antagonistic relationships that the informants experienced within their own families from childhood onwards, and the subsequent inability to establish any meaningful relationships in later life. This study aims to increase our understanding of the complexity of suicidal behaviours in order to help develop genderspecific prevention strategies.

Keywords
Young men, Suicide attempt, Nicaragua, Qualitative approach
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-49785 (URN)
Available from: 2011-11-18 Created: 2011-11-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Edin, K., Dahlgren, L., Lalos, A. & Högberg, U. (2010). "Keeping up a front": narratives about intimate partner violence, pregnancy, and antenatal care. Violence against Women, 16(2), 189-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Keeping up a front": narratives about intimate partner violence, pregnancy, and antenatal care
2010 (English)In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 189-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nine women who had been subjected to severe intimate partner violence during pregnancy narrated their ambiguous and contradictory feelings and the various balancing strategies they used to overcome their complex and difficult situations. Because allowing anyone to come close posed a threat, the women mostly denied the situation and kept up a front to hide the violence from others. Three women disclosed ongoing violence to the midwives, but only one said such disclosure was helpful. This article highlights the complexity of being pregnant when living with an abusive partner and challenges antenatal care policies from the perspective of pregnant women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2010
Keywords
pregnancy, prenatal care, spouse abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-30567 (URN)10.1177/1077801209355703 (DOI)000273344800005 ()20053947 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-01-08 Created: 2010-01-08 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Mogren, I., Winkvist, A. & Dahlgren, L. (2010). Trust and ambivalence in midwives' views towards women developing pelvic pain during pregnancy: a qualitative study. BMC public health, 10, 600
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trust and ambivalence in midwives' views towards women developing pelvic pain during pregnancy: a qualitative study
2010 (English)In: BMC public health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, p. 600-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The Swedish midwife plays a significant role in the antenatal care (ANC) system, and a majority of pregnant women are satisfied with their ANC. Pelvic pain during pregnancy (PP) is prevalent. The study investigated the views, perceptions and attitudes of midwives currently working in ANC regarding PP during pregnancy.

METHODS: The informants were ten midwives between the ages of 35 to 64 years, with a combined experience of 250 years of midwifery. In-depth interviews (n = 4) and one focus group discussion (n = 6) were conducted. The data were interpreted using a qualitative content analysis design.

RESULTS: PP was considered a common, clinical problem that had most likely increased in prevalence in recent decades and could feature prominently in a woman's experience of pregnancy. The informants had developed a strategy for supporting pregnant women affected by PP. The pregnant woman's fear of not being believed concerning her symptoms and the risk of being regarded as a malingerer were acknowledged. Mistrust between a midwife and a woman might occur when the patient's symptoms were vague and ill defined. PP was not considered as something that complicated delivery, and women experiencing it were advised to await 'the natural course of the pregnancy'.

CONCLUSIONS: PP was considered a common, clinical problem and the informants had developed a strategy for supporting pregnant women affected by PP. However, the woman's fear of not being believed concerning her symptoms of PP was acknowledged and mistrust might occur between a midwife and a woman if vague symptoms were reported.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-37536 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-10-600 (DOI)000283366900001 ()20937158 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-11-08 Created: 2010-11-08 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Dahlblom, K., Herrera Rodríguez, A., Peña, R. & Dahlgren, L. (2009). Home alone: children as caretakers in León, Nicaragua. Children and society, 23(1), 43-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Home alone: children as caretakers in León, Nicaragua
2009 (English)In: Children and society, ISSN 0951-0605, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 43-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article seeks to explore and understand the life situations of sibling caretakers in poor areas in León, Nicaragua. The every day lives for caretakers were studied through observations and interviews with children, informants and parents. The children themselves were satisfied and proud to be trusted as caretakers and felt useful in contributing to their families' livelihood. However, in a life course perspective the caretaking role implies a narrowing of life options. Early on they seem to acquire essential life skills but as they grow older many are at risk of falling behind due to their marginalised situation and lack of basic education.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-3529 (URN)10.1111/j.1099-0860.2008.00141.x (DOI)
Available from: 2008-10-10 Created: 2008-10-10 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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