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Eriksson, Irene
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Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Holm, A., Schindele, A., Allard, A., Eriksson, I., Sandström, K., Laurell, G., . . . Olofsson, K. (2019). Mapping of Human Papilloma Virus, p16, and Epstein-Barr Virusin Non-Malignant Tonsillar Disease. Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology, 4(3), 285-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping of Human Papilloma Virus, p16, and Epstein-Barr Virusin Non-Malignant Tonsillar Disease
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2019 (English)In: Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology, E-ISSN 2378-8038, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Due to their location in the entrance of the aero‐digestive tract, tonsils are steadily exposed to viruses. Human papilloma virus (HPV) and Epstein‐Barr virus (EBV) are two potentially oncogenic viruses that tonsils encounter. The incidence of HPV positive tonsillar cancer is on the rise and it is unknown when infection with HPV occurs.

Aim: To investigate if tonsils are infected with HPV and EBV, to study the co‐expression of HPV and its surrogate marker p16, and to evaluate the number of EBV positive cells in benign tonsillar disease.

Materials and Methods: Tonsils from 40 patients in a university hospital were removed due to hypertrophy, chronic or recurrent infection. These were analyzed for presence of HPV, its surrogate marker p16, and EBV. HPV was studied using PapilloCheck (a PCR method), while p16 was identified in epithelial and lymphoid tissue with immunohistochemistry and EBV using EBER‐ISH (Epstein‐Barr encoding region–in situ hybridization).

Results: HPV was not detected, and p16 was present at low numbers in all epithelial samples as well as in 92.5% of the lymphoid tonsillar samples. At least one EBER‐positive cell was seen in 65% of cases. Larger numbers of EBER‐expressing cells were only seen in two cases.

Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that EBV and HPV infect tonsils independently, but further studies are warranted to confirm their infectious relationship.

Level of Evidence: Cross‐sectional study

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
Human papillomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus, non-malignant tonsillar disease, EBER-ISH, PapilloCheck, immunohistochemistry
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158485 (URN)10.1002/lio2.260 (DOI)000471907200002 ()
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Rusiol, M., Fernandez-Cassi, X., Hundesa, A., Vieira, C., Kern, A., Eriksson, I., . . . Girones, R. (2014). Application of human and animal viral microbial source tracking tools in fresh and marine waters from five different geographical areas. Water Research, 59, 119-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of human and animal viral microbial source tracking tools in fresh and marine waters from five different geographical areas
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2014 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 59, p. 119-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Integrated river basin management planning to mitigate the impacts of economic, demographic and climate change is an important issue for the future protection of water resources. Identifying sources of microbial contamination via the emerging science of Microbial Source Tracking (MST) plays a key role in risk assessment and the design of remediation strategies. Following an 18-month surveillance program within the EU-FP7-funded VIROCLIME project, specific MST tools were used to assess human markers such as adenoviruses (HAdV) and JC polyomaviruses (JCPyV) and porcine and bovine markers such as porcine adenoviruses (PAdV) and bovine polyomaviruses (BPyV) via quantification with real-time PCR to analyze surface water collected from five sites within different climatic zones: the Negro River (Brazil), Glafkos River (Greece), Tisza River (Hungary), Llobregat River (Spain) and Umealven River (Sweden). The utility of the viral MST tools and the prevalence and abundance of specific human and animal viruses in the five river catchments and adjacent seawater, which is impacted by riverine contributions from the upstream catchments, were examined. In areas where no sanitation systems have been implemented, sewage can directly enter surface waters, and river water exhibited high viral loads; HAdV and JCPyV could be detected at mean concentrations of 10(5) and 10(4) Genome Copies/Liter (GC/L), respectively. In general, river water samples upstream of urban discharges presented lower human viral loads than downstream sampling sites, and those differences appeared to increase with urban populations but decrease in response to high river flow, as the elevated river water volume dilutes microbial loads. During dry seasons, river water flow decreases dramatically, and secondary effluents can represent the bulk of the riverine discharge. We also observed that ice cover that formed over the river during the winter in the studied areas in North Europe could preserve viral stability due to the low temperatures and/or the lack of solar inactivation. Porcine and bovine markers were detected where intensive livestock and agricultural activities were present; mean concentration values of 10(3) GC/L indicated that farms were sometimes unexpected and important sources of fecal contamination in water. During spring and summer, when livestock is outdoors and river flows are low, animal pollution increases due to diffuse contamination and direct voiding of feces onto the catchment surface. The field studies described here demonstrate the dynamics of fecal contamination in all catchments studied, and the data obtained is currently being used to develop dissemination models of fecal contamination in water with respect to future climate change scenarios. The results concerning human and animal targets presented in this study demonstrate the specificity and applicability Of the viral quantitative parameters developed to widely divergent geographical areas and their high interest as new indicators of human and animal fecal contamination in water and as MST tools.

Keywords
Microbial Source Tracking (MST), Adenovirus, Polyomavirus, River water, Seawater
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91252 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2014.04.013 (DOI)000337861400012 ()
Available from: 2014-07-31 Created: 2014-07-28 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Evander, M., Eriksson, I., Pettersson, L., Juto, P., Ahlm, C., Olsson, G. E., . . . Allard, A. (2007). Puumala hantavirus viremia diagnosed by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR using samples from patients with hemorrhagic fever and renal syndrome.. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 45(8), 2491-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Puumala hantavirus viremia diagnosed by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR using samples from patients with hemorrhagic fever and renal syndrome.
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2007 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 2491-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Puumala virus (PUUV) is the endemic hantavirus in northern Sweden and causes nephropathia epidemica (NE), a milder form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. There is a need for fast and reliable diagnostics to differentiate the disease from other infections. By aligning virus RNA sequences isolated from 11 different bank voles and one human patient, we designed a real-time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR method for detection of PUUV RNA. The real-time RT-PCR assay showed linearity from 20 to 2 x 10(6) virus copies with a correlation coefficient above 0.98 to 0.99 for all experiments. The detection threshold for PUUV cDNA was two copies per reaction. A two-step qualitative RT-PCR to detect PUUV RNA showed 100% concordance with the real-time RT-PCR assay. PUUV RNA viremia was detected in 33 of 34 PUUV immunoglobulin M (IgM)-positive patients with typical clinical NE disease from the region of endemicity. One PUUV IgM-negative sample had PUUV RNA, and 4 days later, the patient was IgM positive. Of samples with indeterminate IgM, 43% were PUUV RNA positive. The kinetics of antibody titers and PUUV viremia were studied, and five of six NE patients displayed a decrease in PUUV viremia a few days after disease outbreak coupled with an increase in PUUV IgM and IgG. In one patient with continuously high PUUV RNA levels but low IgM and no IgG response, the infection was lethal. These findings demonstrated that real-time RT-PCR is a useful method for diagnosis of PUUV viremia and for detecting PUUV RNA at early time points, before the appearance of IgM antibodies.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-20652 (URN)10.1128/JCM.01902-06 (DOI)17537944 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-24 Created: 2009-03-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Hedin, G., Eriksson, I., Kumlin, U. & Boman, J. (2003). A lack of serologic evidence of transmission of Chlamydia pneumoniae by transfusion of buffy coat-depleted RBCs. Transfusion, 43(5), 646-650
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A lack of serologic evidence of transmission of Chlamydia pneumoniae by transfusion of buffy coat-depleted RBCs
2003 (English)In: Transfusion, ISSN 0041-1132, E-ISSN 1537-2995, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 646-650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In our study, which was limited to 53 seronegative recipients of RBC units from seropositive donors, we found no serologic evidence that C. pneumoniae could be transmitted by RBC transfusion.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41980 (URN)10.1046/j.1537-2995.2003.00379.x (DOI)12702188 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-04-04 Created: 2011-04-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Kuoppa, Y., Boman, J., Scott, L., Kumlin, U., Eriksson, I. & Allard, A. (2002). Quantitative detection of respiratory Chlamydia pneumoniae infection by real-time PCR. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 40(6), 2273-2274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantitative detection of respiratory Chlamydia pneumoniae infection by real-time PCR
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2002 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 2273-2274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Real-time PCR was evaluated as a quantitative diagnostic method for Chlamydia pneumoniae infection using different respiratory samples. Real-time PCR had efficiency equal to or better than that of nested touchdown PCR. This study confirmed sputum as the best sampling material to detect an ongoing C. pneumoniae infection.

National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41981 (URN)10.1128/JCM.40.6.2273-2274.2002 (DOI)12037108 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-04-04 Created: 2011-04-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08
Holm, A., Allard, A., Eriksson, I., Laurell, G., Nylander, K. & Olofsson, K. Absence of high-risk human papilloma virus in p16 positive inverted sinonasal papilloma.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Absence of high-risk human papilloma virus in p16 positive inverted sinonasal papilloma
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Sinonasal inverted papilloma (SIP) is a relatively rare disease, and its etiology is not understood. It is characterized by locally aggressive growth and a strong tendency to recur despite its benign histology.

Aims: The aim of this study was to identify the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) and its surrogate marker p16 in SIP tissue samples from a regional cohort.

Material and Methods: Subjects were identified from our regional center cohort of 88 SIP patients treated between 1984-2014. From these subjects, 54 were included in this study.  Of these, 53 biopsies were analyzed with PCR, and 54 samples were immunohistochemically stained for p16. DNA was extracted from histopathologically verified SIP.  Genotype screening for 13 high risk-, 5 oncogenic and 6 low risk HPV types was performed using the PapilloCheck® HPV-screening test.

Results: HPV analysis was successful for 38 of 53 samples. Of the 38 successfully analyzed samples, only 2 samples were positive for HPV 11.  Notably, p16 was present in the epithelia in all samples, and in the papilloma lesions in 37 samples.

Conclusion: Since only 2 out of 38 SIPs were positive for HPV (type 11), and at the same time p16 was positive in epithelia in all samples and in 37 of 38 papilloma lesions of the samples, it is concluded that p16 cannot be used as a surrogate marker for high-risk HPV-infection in SIP. We are currently planning a prospective, multicenter study in order to increase the study power and in order to be able to better evaluate the clinical implications of HPV-and p16 in SIP.

Keywords
human papillomavirus, inverted nasal papilloma, PapilloCheck, immunohistochemistry
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Research subject
Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158487 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-04-29
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