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Gentile, Michael
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Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Marcinczak, S., Gentile, M., Rufat, S. & Chelcea, L. (2014). Urban Geographies of Hesitant Transition: Tracing Socioeconomic Segregation in Post-Ceausescu Bucharest. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 38(4), 1399-1417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Geographies of Hesitant Transition: Tracing Socioeconomic Segregation in Post-Ceausescu Bucharest
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 1399-1417Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scholars have raised concerns about the social costs of the transition from state socialism to capitalism in Central and Eastern Europe, and geographers are particularly interested in the spatial expressions and implications of these costs, including apparently increasing residential segregation. Applying a range of segregation measures to 1992 and 2002 census data, this contribution studies socio-occupational residential segregation in Bucharest. The conclusion is that Bucharest was relatively socio-spatially mixed at both times; in fact, a modest, yet fully legible, decreasing overall trend is observable. This is at odds with many popular assumptions of the past 20 years.

Keywords
Bucharest, Ceauescu, segregation indices, post-socialism, socioeconomic segregation, socio-occupational segregation, Romania
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-91190 (URN)10.1111/1468-2427.12073 (DOI)000337741800015 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2014-07-23 Created: 2014-07-21 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. & Sjöberg, Ö. (2013). Housing allocation under socialism: the Soviet case revisited. Post-Soviet Affairs, 29(2), 173-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Housing allocation under socialism: the Soviet case revisited
2013 (English)In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 173-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social or public housing is an important component of the housing supply in most European countries. Nowhere, however, has the notion of social housing been taken as far as in the countries that formerly were ruled by socialist regimes, most notably the Soviet Union. For this reason, it may be argued that the development of theorizations on housing has much to learn from this large but inconclusively studied example. One of the avowed virtues of socialism was that the system, in theory, guaranteed its subjects equal rights to housing. That this was not quite the case is well known in the literature, but in fact no robust evidence to support this view (or the contrary) has been presented so far. Therefore, this paper's aim is to investigate the functioning of the Soviet system of housing allocation, assessing its claims to social equity and justice. Based on a detailed case study of about 3500 Soviet-era housing allocation decisions made in Daugavpils, Latvia, at five points in time covering various stages in the development of Soviet power (full coverage of decisions made in 1953, 1960, 1970, 1980, and January-April 1990), we illustrate how much living space was allocated to whom. In addition, we detail the characteristics of the waiting times involved. We apply both descriptive and regression methods on our data-set, making a significant contribution to what is known about the outcome of housing allocation under socialism and, at a more general level, under strictly supply-constrained conditions.

Keywords
Soviet Union, housing, housing allocation, socialism, housing inequalities
National Category
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-76818 (URN)10.1080/1060586X.2013.782685 (DOI)000319740400004 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2013-07-15 Created: 2013-07-15 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. (2013). Meeting the 'organs': the tacit dilemma of field research in authoritarian states. Area (London 1969), 45(4), 426-432
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting the 'organs': the tacit dilemma of field research in authoritarian states
2013 (English)In: Area (London 1969), ISSN 0004-0894, E-ISSN 1475-4762, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 426-432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To the regret of many scholars, science and politics often overlap, and nowhere as clearly as inside countries ruled by authoritarian governments, where research tends to attract the surveillance of repressive authorities and, more specifically, of the secret services (known as the organ' within post-communist space). While such surveillance places significant ethical and methodological challenges on field research, it is rarely discussed in the literature. This paper discusses what may happen when the organ takes interest in fieldwork. Based on the author's experiences in a range of post-communist countries, the aim is to present and discuss the related risks, and to show how these may materialise in relation to the organ's (c)overt activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
post-communism, method, authoritarian states, secret services, fieldwork, risk
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-86342 (URN)10.1111/area.12030 (DOI)000330040000006 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2014-02-24 Created: 2014-02-24 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Marcinczak, S., Gentile, M. & Stepniak, M. (2013). Paradoxes of (post)socialist segregation: metropolitan sociospatial divisions under and after socialism in Poland. Urban geography, 34(3), 327-352
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paradoxes of (post)socialist segregation: metropolitan sociospatial divisions under and after socialism in Poland
2013 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 327-352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The state of the art in research on residential segregation and concentration in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) largely focuses on process description (e.g., the multitude of works on gentrification and suburbanization). Even though major advances in the conceptualization and measurement of segregation have been made, works that scrutinize the patterns of segregation and/or concentration in CEE are rare, while studies that simultaneously explore and link segregation patterns under socialism and after are virtually nonexistent. Relying on Polish census-tract level data on the educational structure of population in 1978, 1988, and 2002, this study explores the patterns of social segregation and concentration in the three major Polish cities (Warsaw, Cracow, and od), representing different paths of development under socialism and after. The results show that the population of the three major Polish cities was still socially heterogeneous at the census tract level in 2002. The results also reveal that the level of social residential segregation in the three cities has been decreasing steadily since 1978, irrespective of the prevailing economic system

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2013
Keywords
Residential segregation, concentration, socialist city, post-socialist city, Poland
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-64019 (URN)10.1080/02723638.2013.778667 (DOI)000320191900003 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2013-01-11 Created: 2013-01-11 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Petrova, S., Gentile, M., Mäkinen, I. H. & Bouzarovski, S. (2013). Perceptions of thermal comfort and housing quality: exploring the micro-geographies of energy poverty in Stakhanov, Ukraine. Environment and planning A, 45(5), 1240-1257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of thermal comfort and housing quality: exploring the micro-geographies of energy poverty in Stakhanov, Ukraine
2013 (English)In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1240-1257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The growing recognition of the importance of indoor environments as 'active political-ecological spaces' has rarely been followed up by a systematic empirical engagement with the constituent dynamics and conceptual issues associated with infrastructural deprivation in this domain, particularly in non-Western contexts. Therefore, we investigate the relationship between self-reported perceptions of thermal comfort in the home, on the one hand, and a range of sociodemographic, housing, and health-related variables, on the other, via a quantitative analysis of a large-scale survey undertaken in the Eastern Ukrainian town of Stakhanov. Using the perceived level of thermal comfort as a starting point for its empirical explorations, we estimate the number and type of households who feel that they are receiving inadequate energy services in the home. Special attention is paid to the role of buildings in shaping the perceptions of thermal comfort.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand oaks: Sage Publications, 2013
Keywords
energy poverty, housing, thermal comfort, cross-sectional studies, Ukraine
National Category
Human Geography Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-64020 (URN)10.1068/a45132 (DOI)000320635800016 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2013-01-11 Created: 2013-01-11 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Tammaru, T., van Kempen, R. & Gentile, M. (Eds.). (2012). Heteropolitanization: social and spatial change in Central and Eastern European cities. Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heteropolitanization: social and spatial change in Central and Eastern European cities
2012 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012. p. 60
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55167 (URN)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Note
Temaredaktörskap för ett helt nummer av tidskriften Cities, vol. 29, nr. 5, 2012. Titeln hänvisar till temanumrets titel.Available from: 2012-05-09 Created: 2012-05-09 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M., Tammaru, T. & van Kempen, R. (2012). Heteropolitanization: social and spatial change in Central and Eastern European cities. Cities, 29(5), 291-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heteropolitanization: social and spatial change in Central and Eastern European cities
2012 (English)In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 291-299Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Elsevier, 2012
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55166 (URN)10.1016/j.cities.2012.05.005 (DOI)000308055700001 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2012-05-09 Created: 2012-05-09 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. (2012). Mass privatisation, unemployment and mortality. Europe-Asia Studies, 64(4), 785-787
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass privatisation, unemployment and mortality
2012 (English)In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 785-787Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55165 (URN)10.1080/09668136.2012.673249 (DOI)000304168500008 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2012-05-09 Created: 2012-05-09 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. & Marcinczak, S. (2012). No more work for Stakhanov: migrants and stayers in the depopulating Donbas, Ukraine. Urban geography, 33(3), 401-419
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No more work for Stakhanov: migrants and stayers in the depopulating Donbas, Ukraine
2012 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 401-419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Labor migration from the less to the more affluent cities and regions is a defining trait of the patterns of population redistribution in Central and Eastern Europe, especially in the former Soviet Union, where international disparities in income and living standards are particularly manifest. While these macro-trends are well portrayed in the literature, their outcome at the household level seldom figures in the literature. In Ukraine, labor out-migration to Russia is a frequently chosen strategy, not least because of the Russophone background of eastern Ukraine and of many of the major cities, including Kiev and Odessa. This out-migration contributes to urban decline. Using multivariate methods, we analyze the characteristics of population subgroups with and without the experience of working abroad. We also use descriptive statistics to assess the impact of migration events within households on the standard of living of the latter. Our data source is the city of Stakhanov Health Interview Survey 2009 (n = 3,000).

Keywords
Ukraine, labor migration, Donbas, survey method, urban population decline
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55036 (URN)10.2747/0272-3638.33.3.401 (DOI)000302726400004 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2012-05-07 Created: 2012-05-07 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Bouzarovski, S., Salukvadze, J. & Gentile, M. (2011). A socially resilient urban transition?: The contested landscapes of apartment building extensions in two post-communist cities. Urban Studies, 48(13), 2689-2714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A socially resilient urban transition?: The contested landscapes of apartment building extensions in two post-communist cities
2011 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 48, no 13, p. 2689-2714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Even though social processes across the globe are increasingly being theorised through a resilience lens, this has rarely been the case within the domain of everyday life in the city. The resilience debate also remains highly geographically selective, as regions that have undergone far-reaching systemic change over the past 20 years-including the post-communist states of the former Soviet Union and eastern and central Europe (ECE)-generally remain omitted from it. In order to address such knowledge gaps, an investigation is made of the relationships between social resilience and micro-level socio-spatial change in the built environment of the post-communist city, by focusing on the institutional, spatial and economic underpinnings of apartment building extensions (ABEs) on multistorey residential buildings in the Macedonian capital of Skopje and the Georgian capital of Tbilisi. Both cities contain a wide variety of ABEs, whose reinforced concrete frame constructions often rival the host buildings in terms of size and function. By exploring the architectural and social landscapes created by the extensions, it is hoped to highlight their embeddedness in a set of policy decisions and coping strategies, as well as their controversial implications on the present and future use of urban space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Harlow: Longman for the Univ. of Glasgow, 2011
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-47895 (URN)10.1177/0042098010385158 (DOI)000294812900001 ()881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2011-10-04 Created: 2011-10-03 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
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