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Ängquist, Karl-Axel
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Brändström, H., Johansson, G., Giesbrecht, G. G., Ängquist, K.-A. & Haney, M. F. (2014). Accidental cold-related injury leading to hospitalization in northern Sweden: an eight-year retrospective analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, 22, 6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accidental cold-related injury leading to hospitalization in northern Sweden: an eight-year retrospective analysis
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2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, p. 6-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cold injuries are rare but important causes of hospitalization. We aimed to identify the magnitude of cold injury hospitalization, and assess causes, associated factors and treatment routines in a subarctic region. Methods: In this retrospective analysis of hospital records from the 4 northernmost counties in Sweden, cases from 2000-2007 were identified from the hospital registry by diagnosis codes for accidental hypothermia, frostbite, and cold-water drowning.Results were analyzed for pre-hospital site events, clinical events in-hospital, and complications observed with mild (temperature 34.9 - 32 degrees C), moderate (31.9 - 28 degrees C) and severe (<28 degrees C), hypothermia as well as for frostbite and cold-water drowning. Results: From the 362 cases, average annual incidences for hypothermia, frostbite, and cold-water drowning were estimated to be 3.4/100 000, 1.5/100 000, and 0.8/100 000 inhabitants, respectively. Annual frequencies for hypothermia hospitalizations increased by approximately 3 cases/year during the study period. Twenty percent of the hypothermia cases were mild, 40% moderate, and 24% severe. For 12%, the lowest documented core temperature was 35 degrees C or higher, for 4% there was no temperature documented. Body core temperature was seldom measured in pre-hospital locations. Of 362 cold injury admissions, 17 (5%) died in hospital related to their injuries. Associated co-factors and co-morbidities included ethanol consumption, dementia, and psychiatric diagnosis. Conclusions: The incidence of accidental hypothermia seems to be increasing in this studied sub-arctic region. Likely associated factors are recognized (ethanol intake, dementia, and psychiatric diagnosis).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
accidental hypothermia, frostbite, body temperature, rewarming, cold-water drowning
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-89251 (URN)10.1186/1757-7241-22-6 (DOI)000334792400001 ()
Available from: 2014-05-26 Created: 2014-05-26 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Brändström, H., Wiklund, U., Karlsson, M., Ängquist, K.-A., Grip, H. & Haney, M. (2013). Autonomic nerve system responses for normal and slow rewarmers after hand cold provocation: effects of long-term cold climate training. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 86(3), 357-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autonomic nerve system responses for normal and slow rewarmers after hand cold provocation: effects of long-term cold climate training
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2013 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 357-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Differences among individuals concerning susceptibility to local cold injury following acute cold exposure may be related to function of the autonomic nervous system. We hypothesized that there are differences in heart rate variability (HRV) between individuals with normal or more pronounced vasoconstriction following cold exposure and that there is an adaptation related to prolonged cold exposure in autonomic nervous system response to cold stimuli.

METHODS: Seventy-seven young men performed a cold provocation test, where HRV was recorded during cold hand immersion and recovery. Forty-three subjects were re-examined 15 months later, with many months of cold weather training between the tests. Subjects were analyzed as 'slow' and 'normal' rewarmers according to their thermographic rewarming pattern.

RESULTS: For the 'pre-training' test, before cold climate exposure, normal rewarmers had higher power for low-frequency (P(LF)) and high-frequency (P(HF)) HRV components during the cold provocation test (ANOVA for groups: p = 0.04 and p = 0.005, respectively). There was an approximately 25 % higher P(HF) at the start in normal rewarmers, in the logarithmic scale. Low frequency-to-high frequency ratio (P(LF)/P(HF)) showed lower levels for normal rewarmers (ANOVA for groups: p = 0.04). During the 'post-training' cold provocation test, both groups lacked the marked increase in heart rate that occurred during cold exposure at the 'pre-training' setting. After cold acclimatization (post-training), normal rewarmers showed lower resting power values for the low-frequency and high-frequency HRV components. After winter training, the slow rewarmers showed reduced low-frequency power for some of the cold provocation measurements but not all (average total P(LF), ANOVA p = 0.05), which was not present before winter training.

CONCLUSIONS: These HRV results support the conclusion that cold adaptation occurred in both groups. We conclude that further prospective study is needed to determine whether cold adaptation provides protection to subjects at higher risk for cold injury, that is, slow rewarmers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2013
Keywords
hypothermia, automatic nervous system, physiological adaptation, heart rate variability
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55582 (URN)10.1007/s00420-012-0767-3 (DOI)000316484000011 ()22526086 (PubMedID)1432-1246 (Electronic) 0340-0131 (Linking) (ISBN)
Note

Originally published in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2012-05-22 Created: 2012-05-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Herlitz, J., Svensson, L., Engdahl, J., Gelberg, J., Silfverstolpe, J., Wisten, A., . . . Holmberg, S. (2007). Characteristics of cardiac arrest and resuscitation by age group: an analysis from the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 25(9), 1025-1031
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics of cardiac arrest and resuscitation by age group: an analysis from the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry
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2007 (English)In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1025-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The objective of this study was to describe patients who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) by age group.

METHODS: All patients who suffered from an OHCA between 1990 and 2005 and are included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry (n = 40,503) were classified into the following age groups: neonates, younger than 1 year; young children, between 1 and 4 years; older children, between 5 and 12 years; adolescents, between 13 and 17 years; young adults, between 18 and 35 years; adults not retired, between 36 and 64 years; adults retired, between 65 and 79 years; and older adults, 80 years or older.

RESULTS: Ventricular fibrillation was lowest in young children (3%) and highest in adults (35%). Survival to 1 month was lowest in neonates (2.6%) and highest in older children (7.8%). Children (<18 years), young adults (18-35 years), and adults (>35 years) survived to 1 month 24.5%, 21.2%, and 13.6% of cases, respectively (P = .0003 for trend) when found in a shockable rhythm. The corresponding figures for nonshockable rhythms were 3.8%, 3.2%, and 1.6%, respectively (P < .0001 for trend).

CONCLUSIONS: There is a large variability in characteristics and outcome among patients in various age groups who experienced an OHCA. Among the large age groups, there was a successive decline in survival with increasing age in shockable and nonshockable rhythms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
W. B. Saunders Co., 2007
Keywords
young adults, cardiopulmonary arrest, sudden death, epidemiology, children, survival, Sweden, CPR
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22702 (URN)10.1016/j.ajem.2007.03.008 (DOI)000251568000007 ()18022497 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-05-15 Created: 2009-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Herlitz, J., Svensson, L., Engdahl, J., Ängquist, K.-A., Silfverstolpe, J. & Holmberg, S. (2006). Association between interval between call for ambulance and return of spontaneous circulation and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.. Resuscitation, 71(1), 40-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between interval between call for ambulance and return of spontaneous circulation and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
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2006 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 40-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Aged, Ambulances, Blood Circulation/*physiology, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Emergency Medical Services, Female, Heart Arrest/*mortality/therapy, Humans, Male, Time Factors
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6061 (URN)16945468 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-12-05 Created: 2007-12-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Herlitz, J., Svensson, L., Silfverstolpe, J., Ängquist, K.-A., Wisten, A., Engdahl, J. & Holmberg, S. (2006). Characteristics and outcome amongst young adults suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation is attempted.. J Intern Med, 260(5), 435-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics and outcome amongst young adults suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation is attempted.
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2006 (English)In: J Intern Med, ISSN 0954-6820, Vol. 260, no 5, p. 435-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/*mortality, Emergency Medical Services, Female, Heart Arrest/*mortality/therapy, Humans, Male, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Survival Analysis, Sweden/epidemiology, Time Factors, Ventricular Fibrillation/*epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-15344 (URN)doi:10.1111/j.1365-2796.2006.01705.x (DOI)17040249 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-12-04 Created: 2007-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Herlitz, J., Engdahl, J., Svensson, L., Ängquist, K.-A., Silfverstolpe, J. & Holmberg, S. (2006). Major differences in 1-month survival between hospitals in Sweden among initial survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.. Resuscitation, 70(3), 404-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Major differences in 1-month survival between hospitals in Sweden among initial survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
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2006 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 404-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Aged, Aged; 80 and over, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/*methods, Emergency Medical Services, Female, Heart Arrest, Hospitals/*standards, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Survival Rate, Sweden/epidemiology, Time Factors
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6062 (URN)16828952 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-12-05 Created: 2007-12-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Aasa, U., Kalezic, N., Lyskov, E., Ängquist, K.-A. & Barnekow-Bergkvist, M. (2006). Stress monitoring of ambulance personnel during work and leisure time.. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 80(1), 51-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress monitoring of ambulance personnel during work and leisure time.
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2006 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Adult, Ambulances/*manpower, Blood Pressure/physiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Emergency Medical Technicians/*psychology, Energy Metabolism/physiology, Female, Heart Rate/physiology, Humans, Hydrocortisone/analysis, Leisure Activities, Male, Medical Records, Monitoring; Physiologic, Occupational Diseases/*diagnosis/epidemiology/psychology, Personnel Staffing and Scheduling, Questionnaires, Stress/*diagnosis/epidemiology, Stress; Psychological/*diagnosis/epidemiology, Time Factors, Work Schedule Tolerance
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6064 (URN)10.1007/s00420-006-0103-x (DOI)16680487 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-12-05 Created: 2007-12-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Herlitz, J., Engdahl, J., Svensson, L., Young, M., Ängquist, K.-A. & Holmberg, S. (2005). Changes in demographic factors and mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden. Coronary Artery Disease, 16(1), 51-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in demographic factors and mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden
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2005 (English)In: Coronary Artery Disease, ISSN 0954-6928, E-ISSN 1473-5830, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To describe changes between 1992 and 2003 in age, sex, factors at resuscitation and survival among patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

METHODS: This was a prospective observational study including various ambulance organizations in Sweden. Patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 1992 and 2003 included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry were followed for survival to 1 month.

RESULTS: In all 19 791 cases took part in the survey. There was a slight increase in mean age from 68 to 70 years (P = 0.025) and an increase of females from 29 to 32% (P = 0.0001). There was a change in witnessed status (P < 0.0001) with an increase in crew-witnessed cases and a decrease in non-witnessed cases. There was a decrease in cases of a cardiac etiology from 75 to 61% (P < 0.0001) and a decrease in the percentage found in ventricular fibrillation from 36 to 25% (P < 0.0001). When crew-witnessed cases were excluded the proportion receiving bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increased from 30 to 42% (P < 0.0001). There was a slight increase in the overall proportion of patients hospitalized alive from 16 to 20% (P = 0.032). There was no significant change in the overall proportion of survivors at 1 month after cardiac arrest (4.5% in 1992 and 5.0% in 2003).

CONCLUSIONS: Among patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden some changes took place. The most important ones were a decrease in the proportion of patients found in ventricular fibrillation and an increase in the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR. The proportion of patients admitted alive to hospital increased moderately, whereas the proportion of patients alive after 1 month remained unchanged.

Keywords
out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, time trend
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22699 (URN)10.1097/00019501-200502000-00010 (DOI)000227228000010 ()15654201 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-05-15 Created: 2009-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Herlitz, J., Engdahl, J., Svensson, L., Young, M., Ängquist, K.-A. & Holmberg, S. (2005). Characteristics and outcome among children suffering from out of hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden. Resuscitation, 64(1), 37-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characteristics and outcome among children suffering from out of hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden
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2005 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 37-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: To evaluate the characteristics, outcome and prognostic factors among children suffering from out of hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

METHODS: Patients aged below 18 years suffering from out of hospital cardiac arrest which were not crew witnessed and included in the Swedish cardiac arrest registry were included in the survey. This survey included the period 1990-2001 and 60 ambulance organisations covering 85% of the Swedish population (8 million inhabitants).

RESULTS: In all 457 children participated in the survey of which 32% were bystander witnessed and 68% received bystander CPR. Ventricular fibrillation was found in 6% of the cases. The overall survival to 1 month was 4%. The aetiology was sudden infant death syndrome in 34% and cardiac in 11%. When in a multivariate analysis considering age, sex, witnessed status, bystander CPR, initial rhythm, aetiology and the interval between call for, and arrival of, the ambulance and place of arrest only one appeared as an independent predictor of an increased chance of surviving cardiac arrest occurring outside home (adjusted odds ratio 8.7; 95% CL 2.2-58.1).

CONCLUSION: Among children suffering from out of hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden that were not crew witnessed, the overall survival is low (4%). The chance of survival appears to be markedly increased if the arrest occurs outside the patients home compared with at home. No other strong predictors for an increased chance of survival could be demonstrated.

Keywords
cardiac arrest, child
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22697 (URN)10.1016/j.resuscitation.2004.06.019 (DOI)000226569800006 ()15629553 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-05-15 Created: 2009-05-15 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Herlitz, J., Svensson, L., Holmberg, S., Ängquist, K.-A. & Young, M. (2005). Efficacy of bystander CPR: intervention by lay people and by health care professionals.. Resuscitation, 66(3), 291-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficacy of bystander CPR: intervention by lay people and by health care professionals.
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2005 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 291-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Age Distribution, Aged, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/*statistics & numerical data, Emergency Medical Services/*statistics & numerical data, Female, Heart Arrest/*mortality/*therapy, Humans, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care), Sex Distribution, Survival Analysis, Sweden/epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-6065 (URN)15950357 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-12-05 Created: 2007-12-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved

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