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Holmberg, Dan
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Publications (10 of 64) Show all publications
Fransen-Pettersson, N., Duarte, N., Nilsson, J., Lundholm, M., Mayans, S., Larefalk, Å., . . . Holmberg, D. (2016). A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis. PLoS ONE, 11(7), Article ID e0159850.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, article id e0159850Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders.

National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-126338 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0159850 (DOI)000380797500147 ()27441847 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2013-67X-07929-27-3
Available from: 2016-10-25 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Holmberg, D., Ruikka, K., Lindgren, P., Eliasson, M. & Mayans, S. (2016). Association of CD247 (CD3ζ) gene polymorphisms with T1D and AITD in the population of northern Sweden. BMC Medical Genetics, 17(1), Article ID 70.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of CD247 (CD3ζ) gene polymorphisms with T1D and AITD in the population of northern Sweden
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2016 (English)In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: T1D and AITD are autoimmune disorders commonly occurring in the same family and even in the same individual. The genetic contribution to these disorders is complex making uncovering of susceptibility genes very challenging. The general aim of this study was to identify loci and genes contributing to T1D/AITD susceptibility. Our strategy was to perform linkage and association studies in the relatively genetically homogenous population of northern Sweden. We performed a GWLS to find genomic regions linked to T1D/AITD in families from northern Sweden and we performed an association study in the families to test for association between T1D/AITD and variants in previously published candidate genes as well as a novel candidate gene, CD247.

METHODS: DNA prepared from 459 individuals was used to perform a linkage and an association study. The ABI PRISM Linkage Mapping Set v2.5MD10 was employed for an initial 10-cM GWLS, and additional markers were added for fine mapping. Merlin was used for linkage calculations. For the association analysis, a GoldenGate Custom Panel from Illumina containing 79 SNPs of interest was used and FBAT was used for association calculations.

RESULTS: Our study revealed linkage to two previously identified chromosomal regions, 4q25 and 6p22, as well as to a novel chromosomal region, 1q23. The association study replicated association to PTPN22, HLA-DRB1, INS, IFIH1, CTLA4 and C12orf30. Evidence in favor of association was also found for SNPs in the novel susceptibility gene CD247.

CONCLUSIONS: Several risk loci for T1D/AITD identified in published association studies were replicated in a family material, of modest size, from northern Sweden. This provides evidence that these loci confer disease susceptibility in this population and emphasizes that small to intermediate sized family studies in this population can be used in a cost-effective manner for the search of genes involved in complex diseases. The linkage study revealed a chromosomal region in which a novel T1D/AITD susceptibility gene, CD247, is located. The association study showed association between T1D/AITD and several variants in this gene. These results suggests that common susceptibility genes act in concert with variants of CD247 to generate genetic risk for T1D/AITD in this population

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Linkage, Association, Family, Type 1 diabetes, Autoimmune thyroid disease
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-127025 (URN)10.1186/s12881-016-0333-z (DOI)000442378500001 ()27716086 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-10-26 Created: 2016-10-26 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Schmidt-Christensen, A., Hansen, L., Ilegems, E., Fransen-Pettersson, N., Dahl, U., Gupta, S., . . . Holmberg, D. (2013). Imaging dynamics of CD11c(+) cells and Foxp3(+) cells in progressive autoimmune insulitis in the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Diabetologia, 56(12), 2669-2678
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imaging dynamics of CD11c(+) cells and Foxp3(+) cells in progressive autoimmune insulitis in the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes
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2013 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 2669-2678Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to visualise the dynamics and interactions of the cells involved in autoimmune-driven inflammation in type 1 diabetes. We adopted the anterior chamber of the eye (ACE) transplantation model to perform non-invasive imaging of leucocytes infiltrating the endocrine pancreas during initiation and progression of insulitis in the NOD mouse. Individual, ACE-transplanted islets of Langerhans were longitudinally and repetitively imaged by stereomicroscopy and two-photon microscopy to follow fluorescently labelled leucocyte subsets. We demonstrate that, in spite of the immune privileged status of the eye, the ACE-transplanted islets develop infiltration and beta cell destruction, recapitulating the autoimmune insulitis of the pancreas, and exemplify this by analysing reporter cell populations expressing green fluorescent protein under the Cd11c or Foxp3 promoters. We also provide evidence that differences in morphological appearance of subpopulations of infiltrating leucocytes can be correlated to their distinct dynamic behaviour. Together, these findings demonstrate that the kinetics and dynamics of these key cellular components of autoimmune diabetes can be elucidated using this imaging platform for single cell resolution, non-invasive and repetitive monitoring of the individual islets of Langerhans during the natural development of autoimmune diabetes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013
Keywords
Animal-mouse, Imaging, Islet degeneration and damage, Islet transplantation
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-83613 (URN)10.1007/s00125-013-3024-8 (DOI)000326599300016 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2013-12-06 Created: 2013-12-03 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Parsa, R., Andresen, P., Gillett, A., Mia, S., Zhang, X.-M., Mayans, S., . . . Harris, R. A. (2012). Adoptive transfer of immunomodulatory M2 Macrophages prevents type 1 Diabetes in NOD Mice. Diabetes, 61(11), 2881-2892
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adoptive transfer of immunomodulatory M2 Macrophages prevents type 1 Diabetes in NOD Mice
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2012 (English)In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 61, no 11, p. 2881-2892Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Macrophages are multifunctional immune cells that may either drive or modulate disease pathogenesis depending on their activation phenotype. Autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic proinflammatory condition characterized by unresolved destruction of pancreatic islets. Adoptive cell transfer of macrophages with immunosuppressive properties represents a novel immunotherapy for treatment of such chronic autoimmune diseases. We used a panel of cytokines and other stimuli to discern the most effective regimen for in vitro induction of immunosuppressive macrophages (M2r) and determined interleukin (IL)-4/IL-10/transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) to be optimal. M2r cells expressed programmed cell death 1 ligand-2, fragment crystallizable region gamma receptor IIlb, IL-10, and TGF-beta, had a potent deactivating effect on proinflammatory lipopolysaccharide/interferon-gamma-stimulated macrophages, and significantly suppressed T-cell proliferation. Clinical therapeutic efficacy was assessed after adoptive transfer in NOD T1D mice, and after a single transfer of M2r macrophages, >80% of treated NOD mice were protected against T1D for at least 3 months, even when transfer was conducted just prior to clinical onset. Fluorescent imaging analyses revealed that adoptively transferred M2r macrophages specifically homed to the inflamed pancreas, promoting 3-cell survival. We suggest that M2r macrophage therapy represents a novel intervention that stops ongoing autoimmune T1D and may have relevance in a clinical setting. Diabetes 61:2881-2892, 2012

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American diabetes Association, 2012
National Category
Immunology in the medical area Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-63774 (URN)10.2337/db11-1635 (DOI)000312041600026 ()
Available from: 2013-01-14 Created: 2013-01-07 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Kadri, N., Korpos, E., Gupta, S., Briet, C., Löfbom, L., Yagita, H., . . . Cardell, S. L. (2012). CD4(+) type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes. Journal of Immunology, 188(7), 3138-3149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CD4(+) type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 188, no 7, p. 3138-3149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic β cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry diverse TCRs, prevented T1D in the NOD mouse model for the human disease. In this study, we show that CD4(+) 24αβ type II NKT cells, but not CD4/CD8 double-negative NKT cells, were sufficient to downregulate diabetogenic CD4(+) BDC2.5 NOD T cells in adoptive transfer experiments. CD4(+) 24αβ NKT cells exhibited a memory phenotype including high ICOS expression, increased cytokine production, and limited display of NK cell markers, compared with double-negative 24αβ NKT cells. Blocking of ICOS or the programmed death-1/programmed death ligand 1 pathway was shown to abolish the regulation that occurred in the pancreas draining lymph nodes. To our knowledge, these results provide for the first time cellular and molecular information on how type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells regulate T1D.

National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-64531 (URN)10.4049/jimmunol.1101390 (DOI)000302150300028 ()22371394 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-01-31 Created: 2013-01-31 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Kalis, M., Bolmeson, C., Esguerra, J. L., Gupta, S., Edlund, A., Tormo-Badia, N., . . . Cilio, C. M. (2011). Beta-cell specific deletion of dicer1 leads to defective insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus. PLoS ONE, 6(12), e29166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beta-cell specific deletion of dicer1 leads to defective insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus
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2011 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 12, p. e29166-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mature microRNAs (miRNAs), derived through cleavage of pre-miRNAs by the Dicer1 enzyme, regulate protein expression in many cell-types including cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. To investigate the importance of miRNAs in mouse insulin secreting beta-cells, we have generated mice with a beta-cells specific disruption of the Dicer1 gene using the Cre-lox system controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). In contrast to their normoglycaemic control littermates (RIP-Cre(+/-) Dicer1(Delta/wt)), RIP-Cre(+/-) Dicer1(flox/flox) mice (RIP-Cre Dicer1(Delta/Delta)) developed progressive hyperglycaemia and full-blown diabetes mellitus in adulthood that recapitulated the natural history of the spontaneous disease in mice. Reduced insulin gene expression and concomitant reduced insulin secretion preceded the hyperglycaemic state and diabetes development. Immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and ultrastructural analyses revealed altered islet morphology, marked decreased beta-cell mass, reduced numbers of granules within the beta-cells and reduced granule docking in adult RIP-Cre Dicer1(Delta/Delta) mice. beta-cell specific Dicer1 deletion did not appear to disrupt fetal and neonatal beta-cell development as 2-week old RIP-Cre Dicer1(Delta/Delta) mice showed ultrastructurally normal beta-cells and intact insulin secretion. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that a beta-cell specific disruption of the miRNAs network, although allowing for apparently normal beta-cell development, leads to progressive impairment of insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and diabetes development.

Keywords
gene-expression; microrna expression; mouse development; pancreas; differentiation; quantification; identification; dysfunction; pathway; driven
National Category
Biomedical Laboratory Science/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-53404 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0029166 (DOI)000300674900019 ()
Available from: 2012-03-23 Created: 2012-03-23 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Korpos, E., Kadri, N., Holmberg, D., Cardell, S. & Sorokin, L. (2011). The Role of the Extracellular Matrix in Leukocyte Infiltration into the Pancreas of Non Obese Diabetic Mice. In: European Society for Microcirculation (ESM): German Society of Microcirculation and Vascular Biology (GfMVB)Munich, Germany. Paper presented at European Society for Microcirculation (ESM) / German Society of Microcirculation and Vascular Biology (GfMVB) Munich, Germany, October 13–16, 2011 (pp. 334-334). Berlin: Karger, 48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of the Extracellular Matrix in Leukocyte Infiltration into the Pancreas of Non Obese Diabetic Mice
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2011 (English)In: European Society for Microcirculation (ESM): German Society of Microcirculation and Vascular Biology (GfMVB)Munich, Germany, Berlin: Karger , 2011, Vol. 48, p. 334-334Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Karger, 2011
Series
Journal of Vascular Research, ISSN 1018-1172 ; Vol. 48 Suppl 1
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-47678 (URN)000294760800330 ()978-3-8055-9901-6 (ISBN)
Conference
European Society for Microcirculation (ESM) / German Society of Microcirculation and Vascular Biology (GfMVB) Munich, Germany, October 13–16, 2011
Available from: 2011-09-28 Created: 2011-09-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Brauner, H., Elemans, M., Lemos, S., Broberger, C., Holmberg, D., Flodström-Tullberg, M., . . . Höglund, P. (2010). Distinct phenotype and function of NK cells in the pancreas of nonobese diabetic mice.. Journal of Immunology, 184(5), 2272-2280
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distinct phenotype and function of NK cells in the pancreas of nonobese diabetic mice.
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2010 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 184, no 5, p. 2272-2280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about target organ-infiltrating NK cells in type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified NK cells with a unique phenotype in the pancreas of NOD mice. Pancreatic NK cells, localized to the endocrine and exocrine parts, were present before T cells during disease development and did not require T cells for their infiltration. Furthermore, NK cells, or NK cell precursors, from the spleen could traffic to the pancreas, where they displayed the pancreatic phenotype. Pancreatic NK cells from other mouse strains shared phenotypic characteristics with pancreatic NK cells from NOD mice, but displayed less surface killer cell lectin-like receptor G1, a marker for mature NK cells that have undergone proliferation, and also did not proliferate to the same extent. A subset of NOD mouse pancreatic NK cells produced IFN-gamma spontaneously, suggesting ongoing effector responses. However, most NOD mouse pancreatic NK cells were hyporesponsive compared with spleen NK cells, as reflected by diminished cytokine secretion and a lower capacity to degranulate. Interestingly, such hyporesponsiveness was not seen in pancreatic NK cells from the nonautoimmune strain C57BL/6, suggesting that this feature is not a general property of pancreatic NK cells. Based on our data, we propose that NK cells are sentinel cells in a normal pancreas. We further speculate that during inflammation, pancreatic NK cells initially mediate proinflammatory effector functions, potentially contributing to organ-specific autoimmunity, but later become hyporesponsive because of exhaustion or regulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Immunologists, 2010
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41765 (URN)10.4049/jimmunol.0804358 (DOI)000274768900008 ()20130214 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-04-01 Created: 2011-04-01 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A.-S., Norén-Nyström, U., Larefalk, Å., Holmberg, D. & Lindskog, M. (2010). Fish oil delays lymphoma progression in the TLL mouse. Leukemia and Lymphoma, 51(11), 2092-2097
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fish oil delays lymphoma progression in the TLL mouse
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2010 (English)In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 2092-2097Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective was to investigate the effects of omega-3 fatty acids, known for their anti-inflammatory effects, on time to lymphoma progression and survival in the TLL mouse, a strain genetically prone to developing aggressive T-cell lymphoma. Compared to mice fed a standard diet, TLL mice fed omega-3 (menhaden fish oil) experienced a significant delay in disease progression and were more likely to remain alive and symptom free during the first 8 months of the study. In contrast, omega-6 supplementation (corn oil) did not significantly affect lymphoma progression. Irrespective of diet, all mice eventually progressed, and 1-year survival was not different between the groups. Immunological analysis demonstrated a significantly altered B-cell compartment and fewer NK cells in healthy C57Black6 mice fed omega-3, compared to controls. In conclusion, a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids delays lymphoma development in the TLL mouse possibly by mechanisms that include complex effects on immune function.

Keywords
T-cell lymphoma, mouse, fish oil, omega-3, immunity
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-40766 (URN)10.3109/10428194.2010.522284 (DOI)000284219400019 ()20919854 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-09 Created: 2011-03-09 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Alanentalo, T., Hörnblad, A., Mayans, S., Nilsson, A. K., Sharpe, J., Larefalk, Å., . . . Holmberg, D. (2010). Quantification and 3-D imaging of the insulitis-induced destruction of β-cells in murine type 1 diabetes. Diabetes, 59(7), 1756-1764
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification and 3-D imaging of the insulitis-induced destruction of β-cells in murine type 1 diabetes
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2010 (English)In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 59, no 7, p. 1756-1764Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to refine the information regarding the quantitative and spatial dynamics of infiltrating lymphocytes and remaining beta-cell volume during the progression of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model of the disease.

Research design and methods: Using an ex vivo technique, optical projection tomography (OPT), we quantified and assessed the 3D spatial development and progression of insulitis and beta-cell destruction in pancreas from diabetes prone NOD and non-diabetes prone congenic NOD.H-2b mice between 3 and 16 weeks of age.

Results: Together with results showing the spatial dynamics of the insulitis process we provide data of beta-cell volume distributions down to the level of the individual islets and throughout the pancreas during the development and progression of type 1 diabetes. Our data provide evidence for a compensatory growth potential of the larger insulin(+) islets during the later stages of the disease around the time point for development of clinical diabetes. This is in contrast to smaller islets, which appear less resistant to the autoimmune attack. We also provide new information on the spatial dynamics of the insulitis process itself, including its apparently random distribution at onset, the local variations during its further development, and the formation of structures resembling tertiary lymphoid organs at later phases of insulitis progression.

Conclusions: Our data provides a powerful tool for phenotypic analysis of genetic and environmental effects on type 1 diabetes etiology as well as for evaluating the potential effect of therapeutic regimes.

Keywords
pancreas, mouse, mice
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-33656 (URN)10.2337/db09-1400 (DOI)000279615100025 ()20393145 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-04-30 Created: 2010-04-30 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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