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Röhm, Marc
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Thunström Salzer, A., Niemiec, M. J., Hosseinzadeh, A., Stylianou, M., Åstrom, F., Röhm, M., . . . Urban, C. F. (2018). Assessment of Neutrophil Chemotaxis Upon G-CSF Treatment of Healthy Stem Cell Donors and in Allogeneic Transplant Recipients. Frontiers in Immunology, 9, Article ID 1968.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of Neutrophil Chemotaxis Upon G-CSF Treatment of Healthy Stem Cell Donors and in Allogeneic Transplant Recipients
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 1968Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neutrophils are crucial for the human innate immunity and constitute the majority of leukocytes in circulation. Thus, blood neutrophil counts serve as a measure for the immune system's functionality. Hematological patients often have low neutrophil counts due to disease or chemotherapy. To increase neutrophil counts and thereby preventing infections in high-risk patients, recombinant G-CSF is widely used as adjunct therapy to stimulate the maturation of neutrophils. In addition, G-CSF is utilized to recruit stem cells (SCs) into the peripheral blood of SC donors. Still, the actual functionality of neutrophils resulting from G-CSF treatment remains insufficiently understood. We tested the ex vivo functionality of neutrophils isolated from blood of G-CSF-treated healthy SC donors. We quantified chemotaxis, oxidative burst, and phagocytosis before and after treatment and detected significantly reduced chemotactic activity upon G-CSF treatment. Similarly, in vitro treatment of previously untreated neutrophils with G-CSF led to reduced chemotactic activity. In addition, we revealed that this effect persists in the allogeneic SC recipients up to 4 weeks after neutrophil engraftment. Our data indicates that neutrophil quantity, as a sole measure of immunocompetence in high-risk patients should be considered cautiously as neutrophil functionality might be affected by the primary treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
neutrophil, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), allogeneic transplant, chemotaxis, hematopoietic stern cell donor
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-152255 (URN)10.3389/fimmu.2018.01968 (DOI)000444324800001 ()30254629 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2018-10-03 Created: 2018-10-03 Last updated: 2018-10-03Bibliographically approved
Röhm, M., Lindemann, E., Hiller, E., Ermert, D., Lemuth, K., Trkulja, D., . . . Sohn, K. (2013). A family of secreted pathogenesis-related proteins in Candida albicans. Molecular Microbiology, 87(1), 132-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A family of secreted pathogenesis-related proteins in Candida albicans
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2013 (English)In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 132-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Analysing culture supernatants of yeast and hyphal cells of Candida albicans, we found two close homologues of pathogenesis-related (PR-) 1 proteins, Rbe1p and Rbt4p, in the secretome. Due to sequence homology, three additional, yet not characterized open reading frames, ORF19.6200, ORF19.2787 and ORF19.2336, together with RBE1 and RBT4 were assigned to a novel family of CaPRY proteins. In a Δrbe1/Δrbt4 deletion strain, genome-wide transcriptional analysis revealed differential transcription of only a limited set of genes implicated in virulence and oxidative stress response. Single deletion of RBE1 or RBT4 in a clinical C.albicans isolate resulted in a moderate but significant attenuation in virulence in a mouse model for disseminated candidiasis. However, a synergistic effect was observed in a Δrbe1/Δrbt4 double deletion strain, where virulence was strongly affected. Remarkably, transcription of RBT4 and RBE1 was each upregulated in blastospores of Δrbe1 or hyphae of Δrbt4 deletion strains respectively, indicating functional complementation thereby compensating a potential virulence defect in the single deletion strains. Furthermore, the double deletion strain showed increased sensitivity to attack by polymorphonuclear leucocytes. Therefore, the crucial contribution of both C.albicans pathogenesis-related proteins to virulence might be vested in protection against phagocyte attack.

National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-63576 (URN)10.1111/mmi.12087 (DOI)000314117500009 ()23136884 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-01-03 Created: 2013-01-03 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Ermert, D., Niemiec, M. J., Röhm, M., Glenthøj, A., Borregaard, N. & Urban, C. F. (2013). Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils. Journal of Leukocyte Biology, 94(2), 223-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, ISSN 0741-5400, E-ISSN 1938-3673, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 223-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bethesda: Federation of American societies for experimental biology, 2013
Keywords
killing, immune evasion, myeloperoxidase, defensins
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Hematology Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80700 (URN)10.1189/jlb.0213063 (DOI)000329744300004 ()23650619 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-09-24 Created: 2013-09-24 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Grimm, M. J., Vethanayagam, R. R., Almyroudis, N. G., Dennis, C. G., Khan, A. N., D'Auria, A. C., . . . Segal, B. H. (2013). Monocyte- and macrophage-targeted NADPH oxidase mediates antifungal host defense and regulation of acute inflammation in mice. Journal of Immunology, 190(8), 4175-4184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monocyte- and macrophage-targeted NADPH oxidase mediates antifungal host defense and regulation of acute inflammation in mice
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 190, no 8, p. 4175-4184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic granulomatous disease, an inherited disorder of the NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in the generation of superoxide anion and downstream reactive oxidant species, is characterized by severe bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammation. Although NADPH oxidase isoforms exist in several lineages, reactive oxidant generation is greatest in neutrophils, where NADPH oxidase has been deemed vital for pathogen killing. In contrast, the function and importance of NADPH oxidase in macrophages are less clear. Therefore, we evaluated susceptibility to pulmonary aspergillosis in globally NADPH oxidase-deficient mice versus transgenic mice with monocyte/macrophage-targeted NADPH oxidase activity. We found that the lethal inoculum was >100-fold greater in transgenic versus globally NADPH oxidase-deficient mice. Consistent with these in vivo results, NADPH oxidase in mouse alveolar macrophages limited germination of phagocytosed Aspergillus fumigatus spores. Finally, globally NADPH oxidase-deficient mice developed exuberant neutrophilic lung inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine responses to zymosan, a fungal cell wall-derived product composed principally of particulate beta-glucans, whereas inflammation in transgenic and wild-type mice was mild and transient. Taken together, our studies identify a central role for monocyte/macrophage NADPH oxidase in controlling fungal infection and in limiting acute lung inflammation. The Journal of Immunology, 2013, 190: 4175-4184.

National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-71086 (URN)10.4049/jimmunol.1202800 (DOI)000317274500035 ()
Available from: 2013-06-17 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Almyroudis, N. G., Grimm, M. J., Davidson, B. A., Röhm, M., Urban, C. F. & Segal, B. H. (2013). NETosis and NADPH oxidase: at the intersection of host defense, inflammation, and injury. Frontiers in Immunology, 4, Article ID 45.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>NETosis and NADPH oxidase: at the intersection of host defense, inflammation, and injury
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2013 (English)In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 4, article id 45Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neutrophils are armed with both oxidant-dependent and -independent pathways for killing pathogens. Activation of the phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase constitutes an emergency response to infectious threat and results in the generation of antimicrobial reactive oxidants. In addition, NADPH oxidase activation in neutrophils is linked to activation of granular proteases and generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETosis involves the release of nuclear and granular components that can target extracellular pathogens. NETosis is activated during microbial threat and in certain conditions mimicking sepsis, and can result in both augmented host defense and inflammatory injury. In contrast, apoptosis, the physiological form of neutrophil death, not only leads to non-inflammatory cell death but also contributes to alleviate inflammation. Although there are significant gaps in knowledge regarding the specific contribution of NETs to host defense, we speculate that the coordinated activation of NADPH oxidase and NETosis maximizes microbial killing. Work in engineered mice and limited patient experience point to varying susceptibility of bacterial and fungal pathogens to NADPH oxidase versus NET constituents. Since reactive oxidants and NET constituents can injure host tissue, it is important that these pathways be tightly regulated. Recent work supports a role for NETosis in both acute lung injury and in autoimmunity. Knowledge gained about mechanisms that modulate NETosis may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to limit inflammation-associated injury.

Keywords
NETs, NADPH oxidase, neutrophils, inflammation, injury
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80701 (URN)10.3389/fimmu.2013.00045 (DOI)000209374100045 ()23459634 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-09-24 Created: 2013-09-24 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Seper, A., Hosseinzadeh, A., Gorkiewicz, G., Lichtenegger, S., Roier, S., Leitner, D. R., . . . Schild, S. (2013). Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases. PLoS Pathogens, 9(9), Article ID e1003614.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases
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2013 (English)In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 9, no 9, article id e1003614Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-80699 (URN)10.1371/journal.ppat.1003614 (DOI)000324922300032 ()24039581 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-09-24 Created: 2013-09-24 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Achouiti, A., Vogl, T., Urban, C. F., Röhm, M., Hommes, T. J., van Zoelen, M. A., . . . van der Poll, T. (2012). Myeloid-related protein-14 contributes to protective immunity in gram-negative pneumonia derived sepsis. PLoS Pathogens, 8(10), e1002987
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Myeloid-related protein-14 contributes to protective immunity in gram-negative pneumonia derived sepsis
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2012 (English)In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 8, no 10, p. e1002987-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia-derived sepsis. Myeloid related protein 8 (MRP8, S100A8) and MRP14 (S100A9) are the most abundant cytoplasmic proteins in neutrophils. They can form MRP8/14 heterodimers that are released upon cell stress stimuli. MRP8/14 reportedly exerts antimicrobial activity, but in acute fulminant sepsis models MRP8/14 has been found to contribute to organ damage and death. We here determined the role of MRP8/14 in K. pneumoniae sepsis originating from the lungs, using an established model characterized by gradual growth of bacteria with subsequent dissemination. Infection resulted in gradually increasing MRP8/14 levels in lungs and plasma. Mrp14 deficient (mrp14(-/-)) mice, unable to form MRP8/14 heterodimers, showed enhanced bacterial dissemination accompanied by increased organ damage and a reduced survival. Mrp14(-/-) macrophages were reduced in their capacity to phagocytose Klebsiella. In addition, recombinant MRP8/14 heterodimers, but not MRP8 or MRP14 alone, prevented growth of Klebsiella in vitro through chelation of divalent cations. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) prepared from wildtype but not from mrp14(-/-) neutrophils inhibited Klebsiella growth; in accordance, the capacity of human NETs to kill Klebsiella was strongly impaired by an anti-MRP14 antibody or the addition of zinc. These results identify MRP8/14 as key player in protective innate immunity during Klebsiella pneumonia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Fransisco: Public Library of Science, 2012
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-62801 (URN)10.1371/journal.ppat.1002987 (DOI)000310530300042 ()23133376 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-12-28 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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