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Lindvall, Kristina
Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Tinc, P. J., Sorensen, J. A., Weinehall, L. & Lindvall, K. (2019). An exploration of rollover protective structures (ROPS) rebate program media coverage: strategies for implementation and sustainment. BMC Public Health, 19(1), Article ID 1257.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An exploration of rollover protective structures (ROPS) rebate program media coverage: strategies for implementation and sustainment
2019 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Media advocacy plays an important role in public health initiatives, as it can provide vital information to target populations, policy makers, or other relevant stakeholders. Unfortunately, little is currently known about the use of media advocacy to promote occupational safety and health programs. This study explores media coverage related to the Rollover Protection Structure (ROPS) Rebate Programs, which were designed to encourage the use of rollover protection on agricultural tractors, thus reducing the risk of tractor overturn fatalities. The Program’s portrayal in the media, as well as the role that the media has played in implementing and sustaining these Programs.

Methods: Media articles pertaining to any of the state-based or National ROPS Rebate Programs and published between November 1, 2006 and October 31, 2018 were included for review. Discourse analysis was used to understand the messages portrayed by the media and how those messages shaped the outcomes of the ROPS Rebate Programs.

Results: During the study period, 212 unique articles were published about the ROPS Rebate Programs. While these articles all portrayed the ROPS Rebate Programs in a largely positive light, they were used at different stages, from pre-implementation through sustainment of the ROPS Rebate Programs, and to different extents.

Conclusions: Media articles have played an important role in implementing and sustaining the ROPS Rebate Programs. Based on the results of this study, more robust and continuous media coverage are important for the longevity and success of public health programs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Rollover protection, Media advocacy, Implementation, Discourse analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163613 (URN)10.1186/s12889-019-7586-3 (DOI)000485299600004 ()31510988 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, B., Norberg, M., Johansson, H., Lindvall, K., Ng, N., Nordin, M., . . . Schulz, P. J. (2019). Health literacy is independently and inversely associated with carotid artery plaques and cardiovascular risk. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health literacy is independently and inversely associated with carotid artery plaques and cardiovascular risk
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims: Health literacy, the degree to which individuals understand and act upon health information, may have a pivotal role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with low health literacy potentially explaining poorer adherence to prevention guidelines. We investigated the associations between health literacy, ultrasound-detected carotid atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk factors.

Methods: Baseline data (cross-sectional analysis) from a randomized controlled trial, integrated within the Västerbotten Intervention Program, Northern Sweden, was used. We included 3459 individuals, aged 40 or 50 years with ≥1 conventional risk factor or aged 60 years old. The participants underwent clinical examination, blood sampling, carotid ultrasound assessment of intima-media wall thickness (CIMT) and plaque formation, and answered a questionnaire on health literacy – the Brief Health Literacy Screen. The European Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation and Framingham Risk Score were calculated.

Results: About 20% of the participants had low health literacy. Low health literacy was independently associated with the presence of ultrasound-detected carotid artery plaques after adjustment for age and education, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.54 (1.28–1.85), demonstrating a similar level of risk as for smoking. Health literacy was associated with CIMT in men. Low health literacy was associated with higher CVD risk scores. Sensitivity analyses with low health literacy set to 9% or 30% of the study sample, respectively, yielded essentially the same results.

Conclusions: Low health literacy was independently associated with carotid artery plaques and a high level of CVD risk scores. Presenting health information in a fashion that is understood by all patients may improve preventive efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Health literacy, cardiovascular risk scores, carotid artery plaque, ultrasound
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-165791 (URN)10.1177/2047487319882821 (DOI)000491457000001 ()31615294 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074364646 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2019-12-04
Tinc, P. J., Jenkins, P., Sorensen, J. A., Weinehall, L., Gadomski, A. & Lindvall, K. (2019). Key factors for successful implementation of the National Rollover Protection Structure Rebate Program: A correlation analysis using the consolidated framework for implementation research. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Key factors for successful implementation of the National Rollover Protection Structure Rebate Program: A correlation analysis using the consolidated framework for implementation research
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives: On US farms, tractor overturns are the leading cause of death; however, these fatalities are preventable with the use of a rollover protection structure (ROPS). A ROPS rebate program was established in New York in 2006 to address these fatalities. Due to its success, the program expanded to six additional states before being implemented as the National ROPS Rebate Program (NRRP) in 2017. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success of the NRRP implementation using short- and long-term ROPS outcome measures and identify which components of the consolidated framework for implementation research (CFIR) correlate with these outcomes.

Methods: Stakeholders involved in the NRRP implementation were surveyed at four time points, beginning at the time of the NRRP launch and then every six months. These surveys measured 14 relevant CFIR constructs. Correlations between CFIR survey items (representing constructs) and three outcome measures (intakes, funding progress, and retrofits) were used to identify CFIR survey items that are predictive of the outcomes.

Results: Eight CFIR survey items were highly correlated (rho ≥0.50) with at least one of the three outcome measures. These eight CFIR survey items included four constructs: access to knowledge and information, leadership engagement, engaging (in fundraising and funding requests), and reflecting and evaluating.

Conclusions: The results of this study provide important guidance for continuing the implementation of the NRRP. Similarly, these findings can inform the evaluation of other similarly structured implementation efforts and the application of CFIR in a variety of settings.

Keywords
agriculture, consolidated framework for implementation research, correlation analysis, factor, implementation, National Rollover Protection Structure Rebate Program, occupational safety, rollover, safety, scale-up, stakeholder engagement
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162438 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.3844 (DOI)31365746 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-10-01
Scribani, M., Norberg, M., Lindvall, K., Weinehall, L., Sorensen, J. & Jenkins, P. (2019). Sex-specific associations between body mass index and death before life expectancy: a comparative study from the USA and Sweden. Global Health Action, 12(1), Article ID 1580973.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific associations between body mass index and death before life expectancy: a comparative study from the USA and Sweden
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2019 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1580973Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Understanding the impact of obesity on premature mortality is critical, as obesity has become a global health issue.

OBJECTIVE: To contrast the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and premature death (all-cause; circulatory causes) in New York State (USA) and Northern Sweden.

METHODS: Baseline data were obtained between 1989 and 1999 via questionnaires (USA) and health exams (Sweden), with mortality data from health departments, public sources (USA) and the Swedish Death Register. Premature death was death before life expectancy based on sex and year of birth. Within country and sex, time to premature death was compared across BMI groups (18.5-24.9 kg/m2 (reference), 25-29.9 kg/m2, 30.0-34.9 kg/m2, ≥35.0 kg/m2) using Proportional Hazards regression. Absolute risk (deaths/100,000 person-years) was compared for the same stratifications among nonsmokers.

RESULTS: 60,600 Swedish (47.8% male) and 31,198 US subjects (47.7% male) were included. Swedish males with BMI≥30 had increased hazards (HR) of all-cause premature death relative to BMI 18.5-24.9 (BMI 30-34.9, HR = 1.71 (95% CI: 1.44, 2.02); BMI≥35, HR = 2.89 (2.16, 3.88)). BMI≥25 had increased hazards of premature circulatory death (BMI 25-29.9, HR = 1.66 (1.32, 2.08); BMI 30-34.9, HR = 3.02 (2.26, 4.03); BMI≥35, HR = 4.91 (3.05, 7.90)). Among US males, only BMI≥35 had increased hazards of all-cause death (HR = 1.63 (1.25, 2.14)), while BMI 30-34.9 (HR = 1.83 (1.20, 2.79)) and BMI≥35 (HR = 3.18 (1.96, 5.15)) had increased hazards for circulatory death. Swedish females showed elevated hazards with BMI≥30 for all-cause (BMI 30-34.9, HR = 1.42 (1.18, 1.71) and BMI≥35, HR = 1.61 (1.21, 2.15) and with BMI≥35 (HR = 3.11 (1.72, 5.63)) for circulatory death. For US women, increased hazards were observed among BMI≥35 (HR = 2.10 (1.60, 2.76) for all-cause and circulatory HR = 3.04 (1.75, 5.30)). Swedish males with BMI≥35 had the highest absolute risk of premature death (762/100,000 person-years).

CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a markedly increased risk of premature death associated with increasing BMI among Swedish males, a pattern not duplicated among females.

Keywords
Obesity, all-cause mortality, circulatory disease mortality, longitudinal studies, premature mortality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-158199 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2019.1580973 (DOI)000463650600001 ()30947624 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
Bashir, F., Ba Wazir, M., Schumann, B. & Lindvall, K. (2019). The realities of HIV prevention. A closer look at facilitators and challenges faced by HIV prevention programmes in Sudan and Yemen. Global Health Action, 12(1), Article ID 1659098.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The realities of HIV prevention. A closer look at facilitators and challenges faced by HIV prevention programmes in Sudan and Yemen
2019 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1659098Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: HIV/AIDS prevention has historically encountered many obstacles. Understanding the factors affecting HIV/AIDS prevention is central to designing and implementing suitable context-specific interventions. Research relating to HIV prevention in the Middle East and North African region is required to address the gradually increasing HIV epidemic.

Objective: This study aimed to explore the perspectives of employees/health care professionals who are working or have worked within HIV prevention in Sudan and Yemen on the challenges and facilitating factors facing HIV prevention.

Methods: A qualitative approach was employed using an open-ended questionnaire. Sixteen stakeholders from governmental and non-governmental agencies participated in the study. The questionnaire focused on the various challenges and facilitating factors facing HIV prevention as well as proposed possible solutions from the perspectives of the participants. The data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results: The study illustrated the similarities in context and HIV prevention systems between Sudan and Yemen. Thematic analysis resulted in three main themes: I) much is achieved despite difficulties; II) a programme left to be paralysed; this theme addressed the main obstacles facing HIV prevention in Sudan and Yemen generating a total of six sub-themes; III) comprehensive change is needed. The participants drew focus and attention to vital changes required to improve the delivery of HIV prevention services. Conclusion: Increased financial support for HIV prevention in Sudan and Yemen is urgently needed. De-stigmatisation and increased political support, advocacy and improved legislation for people living with HIV (PLHIV) are required for the sustainability and effectiveness of HIV prevention programmes in Sudan and Yemen. Civil society organisations must be aided and supported in their role in engaging key populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
HIV, Sudan, Yemen, prevention
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-167390 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2019.1659098 (DOI)31496422 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-17 Created: 2020-01-17 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Näslund, U., Ng, N., Lundgren, A., Fhärm, E., Grönlund, C., Johansson, H., . . . Norberg, M. (2019). Visualization of asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease for optimum cardiovascular prevention (VIPVIZA): a pragmatic, open-label, randomised controlled trial. The Lancet, 393(10167), 133-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualization of asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease for optimum cardiovascular prevention (VIPVIZA): a pragmatic, open-label, randomised controlled trial
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2019 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 393, no 10167, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease often fails because of poor adherence among practitioners and individuals to prevention guidelines. We aimed to investigate whether ultrasound-based pictorial information about subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, targeting both primary care physicians and individuals, improves prevention.

METHODS: Visualization of asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease for optimum cardiovascular prevention (VIPVIZA) is a pragmatic, open-label, randomised controlled trial that was integrated within the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, an ongoing population-based cardiovascular disease prevention programme in northern Sweden. Individuals aged 40, 50, or 60 years with one or more conventional risk factors were eligible to participate. Participants underwent clinical examination, blood sampling, and ultrasound assessment of carotid intima media wall thickness and plaque formation. Participants were randomly assigned 1:1 with a computer-generated randomisation list to an intervention group (pictorial representation of carotid ultrasound plus a nurse phone call to confirm understanding) or a control group (not informed). The primary outcomes, Framingham risk score (FRS) and European systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE), were assessed after 1 year among participants who were followed up. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01849575.

FINDINGS: 3532 individuals were enrolled between April 29, 2013, and June 7, 2016, of which 1783 were randomly assigned to the control group and 1749 were assigned to the intervention group. 3175 participants completed the 1-year follow-up. At the 1-year follow-up, FRS and SCORE differed significantly between groups (FRS 1·07 [95% CI 0·11 to 2·03, p=0·0017] and SCORE 0·16 [0·02 to 0·30, p=0·0010]). FRS decreased from baseline to the 1-year follow-up in the intervention group and increased in the control group (-0·58 [95% CI -0·86 to -0·30] vs 0·35 [0·08 to 0·63]). SCORE increased in both groups (0·13 [95% CI 0·09 to 0·18] vs 0·27 [0·23 to 0·30]).

INTERPRETATION: This study provides evidence of the contributory role of pictorial presentation of silent atherosclerosis for prevention of cardiovascular disease. It supports further development of methods to reduce the major problem of low adherence to medication and lifestyle modification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-154318 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32818-6 (DOI)000455437100026 ()30522919 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council, Dnr ALFVLL-298001Swedish Research Council, Dnr 521-2013-2708Swedish Research Council, 2016-01891Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, Dnr 20150369Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20170481
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Tinc, P. J., Gadomski, A., Sorensen, J. A., Weinehall, L., Jenkins, P. & Lindvall, K. (2018). Adapting the T0-T4 implementation science model to occupational health and safety in agriculture, forestry, and fishing: A scoping review. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 61(1), 51-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adapting the T0-T4 implementation science model to occupational health and safety in agriculture, forestry, and fishing: A scoping review
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 51-62Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite much research to develop life-saving innovations for the agriculture, forestry, and fishing workforce, these populations continue to face the highest fatal and non-fatal injury rates in the United States, as many of these solutions are not fully adopted.

Methods: A scoping review was conducted to provide an overview of research to practice efforts in this field. The language used to describe these initiatives, the utility of the NIH T0-T4 model, and the progress along the research to practice continuum were examined.

Results: Fourteen eligible references demonstrated that progress in implementation science is lacking and that there is little consistency in how researchers apply the T0-T4 model; thus, a new model is presented.

Conclusions: Researchers in this field face several challenges when moving from research to practice. While some challenges are addressed with the proposed model, additional resources and infrastructure to support such initiatives are necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
diffusion, dissemination, implementation, occupational health and safety, research to practice, research translation, T0-T4, widespread adoption
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143631 (URN)10.1002/ajim.22787 (DOI)000418124000006 ()29114898 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Tinc, P. J., Gadomski, A., Sorensen, J. A., Weinehall, L., Jenkins, P. & Lindvall, K. (2018). Applying the Consolidated Framework for implementation research to agricultural safety and health: Barriers, facilitators, and evaluation opportunities. Safety Science, 107, 99-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applying the Consolidated Framework for implementation research to agricultural safety and health: Barriers, facilitators, and evaluation opportunities
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2018 (English)In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 107, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Within agriculture, forestry, and fishing safety and health research, little progress has been made to implement evidence-based interventions into practice. Beginning in the early 2000s, much work has been done to address the leading cause of agricultural fatalities: tractor overturns. In this time a Rollover Protective Structure Rebate Program has been developed to assist farmers in installing safety equipment to prevent these fatalities. In the current study, the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research is adapted so that it may be used to evaluate and improve the scaling up of this intervention. Methods: Each construct specified in the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was incorporated into a survey, which was distributed to a 77 member Coalition of agricultural stakeholders. Stakeholders were asked to rate each construct based on how important the individual felt it was to the implementation of the National ROPS Rebate Program on a scale of 1 (not at all important) to 5 (extremely important). Results: Using the mean score for each construct as a starting point, 23 constructs were selected for inclusion in an evaluation tool which will be used, in future studies, to evaluate the implementation of the National ROPS Rebate Program. Conclusions: Though the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was designed for use in the clinical setting, this study is a first step in applying it to occupational health and safety. The insight gained through this study will provide a foundation for future work on this initiative, as well as in public health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Research translation, Implementation science, Widespread implementation, Evaluation
National Category
Construction Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-148705 (URN)10.1016/j.ssci.2018.04.008 (DOI)000432767800010 ()2-s2.0-85046366505 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Schumann, B., Kinsman, J. & Lindvall, K. (2018). ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Ethiopia country report.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Ethiopia country report
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 24
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162172 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Schumann, B., Kinsman, J. & Lindvall, K. (2018). ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Kenya country report.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ClimRef project – Resilient public health in the context of large-scale, drought-related migration in East Africa: Knowledge status and knowledge needs: Kenya country report
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Publisher
p. 25
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-162171 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
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