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Chotai, Jayanti
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Hansson, M., Chotai, J. & Bodlund, O. (2012). What made me feel better?: patients' own explanations for the improvement of their depression. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 66(4), 290-296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What made me feel better?: patients' own explanations for the improvement of their depression
2012 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 290-296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Depression is common among primary care patients and the usual treatment often consists of antidepressant medication and supportive counselling/follow-ups. Previous studies have shown that patients and professionals have different beliefs about treatment, which in turn can decrease acceptance of the diagnosis, compliance and treatment outcome. Aims: The purpose of this study was to investigate previously depressed patients' beliefs about the cause of their improvement. Methods: Depressed primary care patients (n = 184) who considered themselves improved at follow-up answered an open-ended question about what they believed had made them better. Among these 117 patients had, in addition to treatment as usual, participated in an intervention with patient education and group counselling (the Contactus programme), whereas 67 were controls. The groups were comparable at baseline and 82% were on antidepressants. Results: In total, the patients mentioned 14 separate improving factors, which could be organized to the larger themes external factors, self-management, passing spontaneously and professional help. The most frequently mentioned factors for improvement were the Contactus programme (53.0%), antidepressants (40.2%) and personal development (27.2%). Few gender and age differences were seen. The controls who mentioned professional help were more likely to have a better outcome. Conclusions: The patients were generally positive to professional help such as antidepressants and the Contactus programme. Patient education and group counselling seems to be a valuable supplement to treatment of depressed patients in primary care.

Keywords
antidepressants; depression; group counselling; improvement factors; patient education; patients' beliefs; primary care
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-60653 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2011.644807 (DOI)000308413100010 ()
Available from: 2012-10-26 Created: 2012-10-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Araya, M., Chotai, J., Komproe, I. H. & de Jong, J. T. (2011). Quality of life after postconflict displacement in Ethiopia: comparing placement in a community setting with that in shelters. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 46(7), 585-593
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality of life after postconflict displacement in Ethiopia: comparing placement in a community setting with that in shelters
2011 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 585-593Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The resilience of post-war displaced persons is not only influenced partly by the nature of premigration trauma, but also by postmigration psychosocial circumstances and living conditions. A lengthy civil war leading to Eritrea separating from Ethiopia and becoming an independent state in 1991 resulted in many displaced persons.

METHOD: A random sample of 749 displaced women living in the shelters in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa was compared with a random sample of 110 displaced women living in the community setting of Debre Zeit, 50 km away from Addis Ababa, regarding their quality of life, mental distress, sociodemographics, living conditions, perceived social support, and coping strategies, 6 years after displacement.

RESULTS: Subjects from Debre Zeit reported significantly higher quality of life and better living conditions. However, mental distress did not differ significantly between the groups. Also, Debre Zeit subjects contained a higher proportion born in Ethiopia, a higher proportion married, reported higher traumatic life events, employed more task-oriented coping, and perceived higher social support. Factors that accounted for the difference in quality of life between the shelters and Debre Zeit groups in three of the four quality of life domains of WHOQOL-BREF (physical health, psychological, environment), included protection from insects/rodents and other living conditions. However, to account for the difference in the fourth domain (social relationships), psychosocial factors also contributed significantly.

CONCLUSION: Placement and rehabilitation in a community setting seems better than in the shelters. If this possibility is not available, measures to improve specific living conditions in the shelters are likely to lead to a considerable increase in quality of life.

Keywords
Resilience, Ethiopia, Postmigration, Shelters, Community setting
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41007 (URN)10.1007/s00127-010-0223-1 (DOI)20383488 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-16 Created: 2011-03-16 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M., Chotai, J. & Bodlund, O. (2010). Patients' beliefs about the cause of their depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 124(1-2), 54-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' beliefs about the cause of their depression
2010 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 124, no 1-2, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patients' beliefs about the cause of their depression can affect their help-seeking behavior, treatment preferences, coping strategies and treatment compliance. There are few studies exploring depressed patients' beliefs about the causes and to our knowledge none in a Swedish population. However, previous studies show that the patients more often mention environmental and psychological causes than biological. The aim of this study was to further explore depressed patients' answers to an open-ended question about the etiology of their depression. METHODS: Primary care patients, participating in a study evaluating patient education, were asked an open-ended question about their beliefs about what had caused their depression. Answers were obtained from 303 patients. RESULTS: The analysis of the patients' beliefs emerged into 16 different categories of explanations for depression that could be organized into three larger themes: current life stressors, past life events and constitutional factors. Work-related stress was the most commonly mentioned cause, followed by personality and current family situation. Only 3.6% stated biological reasons. LIMITATIONS: We could only count the frequency of mentioned causes, but no ranking of the importance of these causes. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care patients often gave multi-causal explanations to their depression. Biological explanations were rare. Their beliefs were predominantly current life stressors such as work or family situation and also their own personality. Patients' beliefs about their illness are important in the patient-doctor encounter, when developing new treatment strategies aiming at improved adherence to both psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments and also in patient education programs.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-30515 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2009.10.032 (DOI)000278787400007 ()19923007 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-01-07 Created: 2010-01-07 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M., Chotai, J., Nordström, A. & Bodlund, O. (2009). Comparison of two self-rating scales to detect depression: HADS and PHQ-9. British Journal of General Practice, 59(566), e283-288
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of two self-rating scales to detect depression: HADS and PHQ-9
2009 (English)In: British Journal of General Practice, ISSN 0960-1643, E-ISSN 1478-5242, Vol. 59, no 566, p. e283-288Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: More than half of patients with depression go undetected. Self-rating scales can be useful in screening for depression, and measuring severity and treatment outcome. AIM: This study compares the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) with regard to their psychometric properties, and investigates their agreement at different cut-off scores. METHOD: Swedish primary care patients and psychiatric outpatients (n = 737) who reported symptoms of depression completed the self-rating scales. Data were collected from 2006 to 2007. Analyses with respect to internal consistency, factor analysis, and agreement (Cohen's kappa) at recommended cut-offs were performed. RESULTS: Both scales had high internal consistency (alpha = 0.9) and stable factor structures. Using severity cut-offs, the PHQ-9 (> or =5) diagnosed about 30% more patients than the HADS depression subscale (HADS-D; > or =8). They recognised the same prevalence of mild and moderate depression, but differed in relation to severe depression. When comparing recommended screening cut-offs, HADS-D > or =11 (33.5% of participants) and PHQ-9 > or =10 (65.9%) agreement was low (kappa = 0.35). Using the lower recommended cut-off in the HADS-D (> or =8), agreement with PHQ-9 > or =10 was moderate (kappa = 0.52). The highest agreement (kappa = 0.56) was found comparing HADS-D > or =8 with PHQ-9 > or =12. This also equalised the prevalence of depression found by the scales. CONCLUSION: The HADS and PHQ-9 are both quick and reliable. The HADS has the advantage of evaluating both depression and anxiety, and the PHQ-9 of being strictly based upon the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The agreement between the scales at the best suitable cut-off is moderate, although the identified prevalence was similar. This indicates that the scales do not fully identify the same cases. This difference needs to be further explored.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-26132 (URN)10.3399/bjgp09X454070 (DOI)19761655 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-09-25 Created: 2009-09-25 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Chotai, J., Joukamaa, M., Taanila, A., Lichtermann, D. & Miettunen, J. (2009). Novelty seeking among adult women is lower for the winter borns compared to the summer borns: replication in a large Finnish birth cohort. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 50(6), 562-566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novelty seeking among adult women is lower for the winter borns compared to the summer borns: replication in a large Finnish birth cohort
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2009 (English)In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 562-566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Earlier general population studies have shown that novelty seeking (NS) of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) of personality is lower for persons born in winter compared to those born in summer, particularly for women. Here, we investigate if this result can be replicated in another population. METHOD: The Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort, comprising 4968 subjects (2725 women, 2243 men), was investigated with regard to the temperament dimensions of the TCI and the season of birth. RESULTS: Novelty seeking and reward dependence (RD) showed significant variations according to the month of birth. We found that women born during winter have significantly lower levels of NS compared to women born during summer, with a minimum for the birth month November and maximum for May. These results are similar to those found in a previous Swedish study. Furthermore, our study showed that men born during spring had significantly lower mean scores of RD compared to men born during autumn, with a minimum for birth month March. This was in contrast to the Swedish study, where the minimum of RD was obtained for the birth month December. CONCLUSION: Women born in winter have lower NS as adults compared to women born in summer. Because NS is modulated by dopamine, this study gives further support to the studies in the literature that show that dopamine turnover for those born in winter is higher than for those born in summer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2009
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-36393 (URN)10.1016/j.comppsych.2008.11.010 (DOI)19840595 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-09-29 Created: 2010-09-29 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Chotai, J. (2008). Month of birth in relation to suicide.. British Journal of Psychiatry, 192(4), 313
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Month of birth in relation to suicide.
2008 (English)In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 192, no 4, p. 313-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-41116 (URN)10.1192/bjp.192.4.313 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-03-18 Created: 2011-03-18 Last updated: 2018-06-08
Hansson, M., Bodlund, O. & Chotai, J. (2008). Patient education and group counselling to improve the treatment of depression in primary care: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Affective Disorders, 105(1-3), 235-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient education and group counselling to improve the treatment of depression in primary care: a randomized controlled trial
2008 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 105, no 1-3, p. 235-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The Contactus program for depressed patients in primary care, consists of six lectures about depression, each followed by a group discussion. The aim of this study was to investigate if Contactus can improve treatment outcome in comparison to a control group. METHODS: Forty-six primary care centres in Sweden, each randomly allocated either to the Contactus group or to the control group, included depressed patients, 205 in the Contactus group and 114 in the control group. Besides regular treatment of depression, the Contactus group participated in the educational program. At start and after 6 weeks, patients filled in a questionnaire and the self-reports: HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and GAF-self (Global Assessment of Functioning). RESULTS: After 6 weeks, clinically depressed patients (HAD-depression score >10) had a mean improvement in HAD-D of 4.6 in Contactus vs. 3.0 in controls (p=0.02), and 72% vs. 47% considered themselves to feel better (p=0.01). Increase in GAF score was 11.8 vs. 5.8 (p=0.04), respectively. According to HADS, 55% in Contactus were responders vs. 29% among controls (p=0.006), and 42% vs. 21% (p=0.02) were in remission. LIMITATIONS: Only 40% of the patients in Contactus and 35% among controls were clinically depressed according to the HADS (>10 points) at inclusion. CONCLUSIONS: Patient education and group counselling contributes significantly to better improvement among depressed patients. Group treatment is inexpensive and could be implemented in the routine care of depressed patients in primary care.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-30520 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2007.04.007 (DOI)17509694 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-01-07 Created: 2010-01-07 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Araya, M., Chotai, J., Komproe, I. H. & de Jong, J. T. (2007). Effect of trauma on quality of life as mediated by mental distress and moderated by coping and social support among postconflict displaced Ethiopians. Quality of Life Research, 16(6), 915-927
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of trauma on quality of life as mediated by mental distress and moderated by coping and social support among postconflict displaced Ethiopians
2007 (English)In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 915-927Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-2778 (URN)
Available from: 2007-11-16 Created: 2007-11-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Araya, M., Chotai, J., Komproe, I. H. & de Jong, J. T. (2007). Gender differences in traumatic life events, coping strategies, perceived social support and socio-demographics among postconflict displaced persons in Ethiopia. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 42(4), 307-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender differences in traumatic life events, coping strategies, perceived social support and socio-demographics among postconflict displaced persons in Ethiopia
2007 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-2777 (URN)
Available from: 2007-11-16 Created: 2007-11-16 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Natale, V., Adan, A. & Chotai, J. (2007). Season of birth modulates mood seasonality in humans. Psychiatry Research, 153(2), 199-201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Season of birth modulates mood seasonality in humans
2007 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 153, no 2, p. 199-201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigate whether mood seasonality is modulated by season of birth. A sample of 1682 university students were administered the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire. We found that subjects born during spring or summer months had significantly higher Global Seasonality scores than those born during autumn or winter months.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2007
Keywords
Mood seasonality, Seasons of birth, Circadian typology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-43989 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2006.12.022 (DOI)17669509 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-05-17 Created: 2011-05-17 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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