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Andersson, Barbro
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Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Lindberg, R. H., Olofsson, U., Rendahl, P., Johansson, M. I., Tysklind, M. & Andersson, B. A. (2006). Behavior of fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim during mechanical, chemical, and active sludge treatment of sewage water and digestion of sludge. Environmental Science and Technology, 40(3), 1042-1048
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavior of fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim during mechanical, chemical, and active sludge treatment of sewage water and digestion of sludge
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2006 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 1042-1048Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The behavior and fate of three fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin), one sulfonamide (sulfamethoxazole), and trimethoprim were investigated at a sewage treatment plant in Umeå, Sweden, in 2004. This plant uses conventional mechanical, chemical, and activated sludge methods to treat the sewage water and digest the sludge; the dewatered digested sludge is pelleted (dry weight > 90% of total weight). Raw sewage water and particles as well as effluents and sludge from specific treatment areas within the plant were sampled. In addition to quantifying the antibiotics within the plant, we characterized the sample matrixes to facilitate evaluation of the results. Of the five substances examined, only norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim were present in concentrations higher than their limits of quantification. Norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin sorbed to sludge in a manner that was independent of changes in pH during sewage treatment, and more than 70% of the total amount of these compounds passing through the plant was ultimately found in the digested sludge. The results suggest that fluoroquinolones undergo thermal degradation during pelleting, but more studies are needed to confirm this. Trimethoprim was found in the final effluent at approximately the same concentration and mass flow as in the raw sewage, and could not be quantified in any solid sample. Predicted environmental concentrations, based on consumption data for Umeå municipality, correlated well with the results obtained, especially when the predicted concentrations were corrected to account for the amount of each active substance excreted in urine. The results obtained were compared to those of previous studies of these three substances' behavior and fate and were found to be similar, although some of the other plants studied employed the various treatment steps in different orders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington: American Chemical Society, 2006
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5050 (URN)10.1021/es0516211 (DOI)
Available from: 2006-04-07 Created: 2006-04-07 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Marklund, A., Andersson, B. & Haglund, P. (2005). Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in air from various indoor environments. Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 7(8), 814-819
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in air from various indoor environments
2005 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 814-819Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Eleven organophosphorus compounds (OPs) that are used as plasticizers and flame retardants were analysed in duplicate samples of indoor air from 17 domestic and occupational environments. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns were used as adsorbents and analysis was performed using GC with a nitrogen phosphorus selective detector. The total amounts of OPs in the air samples ranged between 36 and 950 ng m(-3); tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) being the most abundant (0.4 to 730 ng m(-3)), followed by tributyl phosphate (0.5-120 ng m(-3)). Public buildings tended to have about 3-4 times higher levels of OPs than domestic buildings. The relative amounts of individual OPs varied between the sites and generally reflected the building materials, furniture and consumer products used in the sampled environments. Potential sources of these compounds include, inter alia, acoustic ceilings, upholstered furniture, wall coverings, floor polish and polyvinylchloride floor coverings. A correlation was observed between the TCEP concentrations in the air in the sampled environments and previously reported concentrations in dust, but no such correlation was seen for the heavier and less volatile tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP). Based on estimated amounts of indoor air inhaled and dust ingested, adults and children in the sampled environments would be exposed to up to 5.8 mu g kg(-1) day(-1) and 57 mu g kg(-1) day(-1) total OPs, respectively.

Keywords
HUMAN MONOCYTE CARBOXYLESTERASE, ESTERS, EXTRACTION, TRIESTERS, PRODUCTS
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13084 (URN)10.1039/b505587c (DOI)16049584 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-08-17 Created: 2007-08-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fick, J., Pommer, L., Åstrand, A., Östin, R., Nilsson, C. & Andersson, B. (2005). Ozonolysis of monoterpenes in mechanical ventilation systems. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, 39(34), 6315-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ozonolysis of monoterpenes in mechanical ventilation systems
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2005 (English)In: ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, Vol. 39, no 34, p. 6315-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this investigation the ozonolysis of of three monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, Delta(3)-carene and limonene) was studied was studied in authentic mechanical ventilation systems, that included either a cross flow or a rotary heat exchanger. The effects of varying three experimental parameters were investigated: the level of ozone (25 and 75 ppb), the reaction time (25 and 75s), and the surface area in the ventilation duct (14.8 and 29.5 m(2)). The initial concentration of each of the monoterpenes was 20 ppb in every experiment, and 1-16% of the alpha-pinene, < 0.5-13% of the Delta(3)-carene, and < 0.5-16% of the limonene reacted. The effects of humidity (g m(-3)) and temperature of the outdoor and supply air, and water losses in the ventilation duct, were also evaluated. Experiments were based on a chemometric statistical design. Comparison of the results to theoretically calculated values showed that theoretical calculations underestimated the amounts that reacted in the ventilation systems by factors of 2-13, depending on the monoterpene and experimental settings.

Keywords
relative humidity, surface chemistry, heat exchanger, ventilation duct
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-13375 (URN)doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2005.07.013 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-05-08 Created: 2007-05-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Lindberg, R., Wennberg, P., Johansson, M. I., Tysklind, M. & Andersson, B. (2005). Screening of human antibiotic substances and determination of weekly mass flows in five sewage treatment plants in Sweden. Environmental Science and Technology, 39(10), 3421-3429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Screening of human antibiotic substances and determination of weekly mass flows in five sewage treatment plants in Sweden
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2005 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 3421-3429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Twelve antibiotic substances for human use, including trimethoprim and representatives of the fluoroquinolone (FQ), sulfonamide (SA), penicillin (PE), cephalosporin (CE), nitroimidazole (NI), tetracycline (TC), and macrolide (MA) groups, were subjected to a screening study at five Swedish sewage treatment plants (STPs) during one week in 2002 and one week in 2003. The analytes were extracted from raw sewage water, final effluent, and sludge by solid-phase extraction (SPE) or liquid-solid extraction (as appropriate) and then identified and quantified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The most frequently detected antibiotics in the matrices considered in this study were norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, and doxycycline. The other analytes were only detected in a few samples. Analysis of the weekly mass flows through each STP showed that FQs were partly eliminated from the water during sewage water treatment and the highest amounts of these substances were found in sludge. Sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim were mainly found in raw sewage water and final effluent, but these substances had balancing mass flows, indicating that they too can withstand sewage water treatment. The mass flow patterns for doxycycline were more complex, with high amounts occurring in sludge in some cases, suggesting that the behavior of this analyte may be more strongly influenced by the treatment process and other variables at individual STPs. The environmental load (the sum of the amounts in the final effluent and sludge) normalized to the number of inhabitants in the catchment area of each investigated STP compared with theoretical predictions based on consumption data (in parentheses) showed good correlations: norfloxacin, 0.8 (0.9); ofloxacin, 0.3 (0.2); ciprofloxacin, 1.3 (3.5); sulfamethoxazole, 0.2 (0.4); trimethoprim, 1.1 (1.0); and doxycycline, 0.7 (0.4) mg per person per week. The results show that reasonably accurate predictions of environmental load of these antibiotics can be time-effectively derived from consumption data without additional measurements.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-14358 (URN)10.1021/es048143z (DOI)
Available from: 2007-08-17 Created: 2007-08-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pommer, L., Fick, J., Nilsson, C. & Andersson, B. (2004). An experimental comparison of a kinetic model for the reaction of α-pinene and Δ3-carene with ozone and nitrogen oxides. Indoor Air, 14(S8), 75-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An experimental comparison of a kinetic model for the reaction of α-pinene and Δ3-carene with ozone and nitrogen oxides
2004 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 14, no S8, p. 75-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A kinetic model was compiled to simulate reactions of the monoterpenes, α-pinene and Δ3-carene, with O3, NO2 and NO. The influence of different initial settings of O3, NO2 and NO on the monoterpene reaction was evaluated. At initial levels of 75 p.p.b. of O3, NO2 and NO each, 1.5% of α-pinene and 1.1% of Δ3-carene were calculated to react after 215 s. The corresponding experimental results showed that 9.3–12.2% of α-pinene and 9.9–11.7% of Δ3-carene reacted. The calculated levels of O3, NO2 and NO were compared to experimental measurements and were shown to correspond well. However, comparison of the amount of monoterpene reacted between calculated and experimental results, demonstrated that the calculations underestimated the amount of monoterpene reacted in the experimental chamber. The difference between experimental and calculated results could, e.g., be the effect of surfaces and the presence of water, which are parameters not included in the kinetic model known to have influence on these reactions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Köpenhamn: Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004
Keywords
modeling, monoterpene, oxidation, surface, water
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-14012 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0668.2004.00302.x (DOI)000227331500008 ()
Available from: 2007-08-17 Created: 2007-08-17 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pommer, L., Fick, J., Sundell, J., Nilsson, C., Sjöström, M., Stenberg, B. & Andersson, B. (2004). Class separation of buildings with high and low prevalence of SBS by principal component analysis. Indoor Air, 14(1), 16-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Class separation of buildings with high and low prevalence of SBS by principal component analysis
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2004 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we were able to separate buildings with high and low prevalence of sick building syndrome (SBS) using principal component analysis. The prevalence of SBS was defined by the presence of at least one typical skin, mucosal and general (headache and fatigue) symptom. Data from the Swedish Office Illness Study describing the presence and level of chemical compounds in outdoor, supply, and room air, respectively, were evaluated together with information about the buildings in six models. When all data were included the most complex model was able to separate 71% of the high prevalence buildings from the low prevalence buildings. The most important variable that separates the high prevalence buildings from the low prevalence buildings was a more frequent occurrence or a higher concentration of compounds with shorter retention time in the high prevalence buildings. Elevated relative humidity in supply and room air and higher levels of total volatile organic compounds in outdoor and supply air were more common in high prevalence buildings. Ten building variables also contributed to the separation of the two classes of low and high prevalence buildings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2004
Keywords
Principal component analysis, VOC, Sick building syndrome, Indoor air, Ventilation duct, Office building
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-14022 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0668.2004.00203.x (DOI)
Note
Errata Indoor Air 14 (2), 144–144. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0668.2004.00246.xAvailable from: 2007-06-18 Created: 2007-06-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fick, J., Nilsson, C. & Andersson, B. (2004). Formation of oxidation products in a ventilation system. Atmospheric Environment, 38(35), 5895-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Formation of oxidation products in a ventilation system
2004 (English)In: Atmospheric Environment, ISSN 1352-2310, Vol. 38, no 35, p. 5895-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have studied the formation of oxidation products from the ozonolysis of a monoterpene (α-pinene) in an authentic ventilation system. We observed ten products, norpinic acid, pinic acid, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, norpinonic acid, pinonic acid, a C4 dicarbonyl (C4H6O2), a C5 dicarbonyl (C5H8O2), norpinon aldehyde, and pinon aldehyde. Experiments were conducted at a low (2.0 g m−3) and moderate (8 g m−3) humidity levels. All products but C4 dicarbonyl and norpinon aldehyde were detected at the low humidity level, but only glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, C4 dicarbonyl, norpinon aldehyde and pinon aldehyde were detected at a moderate humidity. Experiments were conducted at low ppb levels (75 ppb ozone and 4 and 10 ppb α-pinene) and with a short reaction time (75 s). Experiments showed that 5–6% of the α-pinene reacted, which was approximately 4–5 times more than predicted by theoretical calculations. This discrepancy suggests a significant contribution from heterogeneous reactions. These oxidation products were formed despite low reactant concentrations and a short reaction time, indicating that the formation of oxidation products likely occurs at ambient levels and in real settings.

Keywords
Pinon aldehyde, Pinic acid, Pinonic acid, α-pinene, Relative humidity, Surface chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-14283 (URN)doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2004.08.020 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-05-28 Created: 2007-05-28 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Pommer, L., Fick, J., Andersson, B. & Nilsson, C. (2004). The influence of O3, relative humidity, NO and NO2 on the oxidation of α-pinene and Δ3-carene. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 48(2), 173-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of O3, relative humidity, NO and NO2 on the oxidation of α-pinene and Δ3-carene
2004 (English)In: Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, ISSN 0167-7764, E-ISSN 1573-0662, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 173-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Upto 13% of α-pinene and δ3-carene had reacted after 213 s in this dark experimental set-up, where O3, NO and NO2 were mixed with terpenes at different relative humidities (RHs). The different experiments were planned according to an experimental design, where O3, NO2, NO, RH and reaction time were varied between high and low settings (25 and 75 ppb, 15 and 42%, 44 and 213 s). An increased amount of α-pinene and δ3-carene reacted in the chamber was observed, when the level of O3, NO and reaction time was increased and RH was decreased. In the study, it was found that different interactions affected the amount of terpene reacted as well. These interactions were between O3 and NO, O3 and reaction time, NO and RH, and between NO and reaction time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2004
Keywords
terpene, oxidation, NO, NO2, humidity
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-14009 (URN)10.1023/B:JOCH.0000036847.09169.4a (DOI)000223094700004 ()
Available from: 2007-05-21 Created: 2007-05-21 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Öberg, L., Andersson, B., Andersson, P., Haglund, P., Johansson, M., Karlsson, S., . . . Wiberg, K. (2004). Undergraduate Education in Environmental Chemistry at Umeå University, Sweden. In: SETAC 4th World Congress/25th Annual Meeting in North America, 14-18 November, Portland OR, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate Education in Environmental Chemistry at Umeå University, Sweden
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2004 (English)In: SETAC 4th World Congress/25th Annual Meeting in North America, 14-18 November, Portland OR, USA, 2004Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Abstract to the Fourth SETAC World Congress, oral presentation.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-9204 (URN)
Available from: 2008-06-11 Created: 2008-06-11 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fjällström, P., Andersson, B. & Nilsson, C. (2003). Drying of linseed oil paints: the effects of substrate on the emission of aldehydes. Indoor Air, 13(3), 277–82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drying of linseed oil paints: the effects of substrate on the emission of aldehydes
2003 (English)In: Indoor Air, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 277–82-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effect of substrate on the emission of aldehydes from linseed oil paint was investigated. Plates of glass, fiberboard, gypsum board, lime mortar and wood lath were painted, and then placed into emission chambers. Samples were collected every eighth hour over 10 days with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazin samplers. Analysis was performed with liquid chromatography/UV-detection and mass spectrometry. Paint applied on gypsum board gave the highest total amount of emitted carbonyls, and that on wood lath gave the least. Painted glass had the highest contribution of unsaturated species, and lime mortar, the lowest. Lime mortar also had the highest momentary levels of a single species, 443 nmol/h/m2 of propanal, while fiberboard peaked at only 123 nmol/h/m2 of propanal. In turn, the emission from the painted fiberboard had the slowest decline, and thus at the end of the experiment the highest levels. All substrates gave an emission that peaked within 16 h.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-9216 (URN)doi:10.1034/j.1600-0668.2003.00193.x (DOI)
Available from: 2008-05-30 Created: 2008-05-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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