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Svensberg, K., Kälvemark Sporrong, S., Lupattelli, A., Olsson, E., Wallman, A. & Björnsdottir, I. (2018). Nordic Pharmacy Students' Opinions of their Patient Communication Skills Training. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 82(2), 152-165, Article ID 6208.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nordic Pharmacy Students' Opinions of their Patient Communication Skills Training
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, ISSN 0002-9459, E-ISSN 1553-6467, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 152-165, article id 6208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To describe Nordic pharmacy students' opinions of their patient communication skills training (PCST), and the association between course leaders' reports of PCST qualities and students' perceptions of their training. Secondary objective was to determine what factors influence these associations. Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was performed. The various curricula were categorized into three types (basic, intermediate and innovative training) and students were divided into three groups according to the type of training they had received. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted with different opinions as outcomes and three types of training as exposure, using generalized estimation equations. Results. There were 370 students who responded (response rate: 77%). Students within the innovative group were significantly more likely to agree that they had received sufficient training, and to agree with the assertion that the pharmacy school had contributed to their level of skills compared to students in the basic group. Conclusion. There appears to be an association between larger and varied programs of training in patient communication skills and positive attitudes toward this training on the part of the students, with students reporting that they received sufficient training, which likely enhanced their skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP), 2018
Keywords
patient communication skills training, pharmacy students, Nordic countries
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology Pharmaceutical Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-146819 (URN)10.5688/ajpe6208 (DOI)000428738400011 ()29606708 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Mattsson, S., Wallman, A. & Gallego, G. (2018). Pharmacists' satisfaction with their work: Analysis of an alumni survey. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 14(7), 700-704
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pharmacists' satisfaction with their work: Analysis of an alumni survey
2018 (English)In: Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, ISSN 1551-7411, E-ISSN 1934-8150, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 700-704Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The level of job satisfaction among practicing pharmacists is important because it has been found to affect job performance and employee turnover. The Swedish pharmacy market has undergone major changes in recent years, and little is known about pharmacists' job satisfaction.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the level of job satisfaction and associated factors among graduates from the web-based pharmacy programs at Umea University.

Methods: Job satisfaction of pharmacists was measured as part of an alumni survey conducted with those who graduated from the pharmacy programmes between 2006 and 2014. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, and logistic regression was used to explore factors affecting job satisfaction.

Results: The total number of graduates who completed the survey was 222 (response rate 43%.) The majority of respondents were female (95%), and most were employed at a community pharmacy (85%). The mean age was 39.7 years. The majority of graduates (91%) were satisfied with their job "most of the time" or "all of the time", and 87% of the respondents would "definitely" or "maybe" choose the same career again. The multivariate analysis showed that increasing years in the current position (OR: 0.672 (0.519-0.871)) was associated with lower job satisfaction. Older age (OR: 1.123 (1.022-1.234)), the perception that the knowledge and skills acquired during university education is useful in the current job (OR: 4.643 (1.255-17.182)) and access to continuing professional development (OR: 9.472 (1.965 -45.662)) were associated with higher job satisfaction.

Conclusion: Most graduates from the web-based pharmacy programmes were satisfied with their current job. Access to continuing professional development seems to be important for the level of job satisfaction among pharmacists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Job satisfaction, Pharmacy education, Continuing professional development
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-150749 (URN)10.1016/j.sapharm.2017.08.006 (DOI)000436607800011 ()28870444 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028652433 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Svensberg, K., Björnsdottir, I., Wallman, A. & Kälvemark Sporrong, S. (2017). Nordic Pharmacy Schools' Experience in Communication Skills Training. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 81(9), Article ID 6005.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nordic Pharmacy Schools' Experience in Communication Skills Training
2017 (English)In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, ISSN 0002-9459, E-ISSN 1553-6467, Vol. 81, no 9, article id 6005Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To assess communication skills training at Nordic pharmacy schools and explore ways for improvement. Methods. E-mail questionnaires were developed and distributed with the aim to explore current practice and course leaders' opinions regarding teaching of patient communication skills at all the 11 master level Nordic (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) pharmacy schools. The questionnaires contained both closed-and open-ended questions. Results. There was a variation of patient communication skills training among schools. In general, communication skills training was included in one to five courses (mode 1); varied in quantity (6-92 hours); had low use of experiential training methods; and had challenges regarding assessments and acquiring sufficient resources. However, some schools had more focus on such training. Conclusion. The results show room for improvement in patient communication skills training in most Nordic pharmacy schools and give insights into how to enhance communication skill building in pharmacy curricula. Suggestions for improving the training include: early training start, evidence-based frameworks, experiential training, and scaffolding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, 2017
Keywords
patient communication skills training, pharmacy students, Nordic countries
National Category
Pedagogy Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-143678 (URN)10.5688/ajpe6005 (DOI)000418323800005 ()
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Wallman, A., Vaudan, C. & Sporrong, S. K. (2013). Communications training in pharmacy education, 1995-2010. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 77(2), 36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communications training in pharmacy education, 1995-2010
2013 (English)In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, ISSN 0002-9459, E-ISSN 1553-6467, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of the pharmacist as a "communicator" of information and advice between patients, other healthcare practitioners, and the community is recognized as a vital component of the responsibilities of a practicing pharmacist. Pharmacy education is changing to reflect this, although the difficulty is in designing a curriculum that is capable of equipping students with the necessary knowledge and skills, using activities that are effective in promoting communication competency. The objective of this review was to identify published, peer-reviewed articles concerning communication training in pharmacy education programs, and describe which communication skills the structured learning activities aimed to improve and how these learning activities were assessed. A systematic literature search was conducted and the articles found were analyzed and divided into categories based on specific communication skills taught and type of learning activity used. Oral interpersonal communication skills targeted at patients were the most common skill-type described, followed by clinical writing skills. Common teaching methods included simulated and standardized patient interactions and pharmacy practice experience courses. Most educational interventions were assessed by subjective measures. Many interventions were described as fragments, in isolation of other learning activities that took place in a course, which impedes complete analysis of study results. To succeed in communication training, integration between different learning activities and progression within pharmacy educations are important.

Keywords
communication, educational methods, learning outcomes, pharmacy education
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67683 (URN)10.5688/ajpe77236 (DOI)000316182600016 ()23519011 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-03-27 Created: 2013-03-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Kettis, Å., Ring, L., Gustavsson, M. & Wallman, A. (2013). Placements: an underused vehicle for quality enhancement in higher education?. Quality in Higher Education, 19(1), 28-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Placements: an underused vehicle for quality enhancement in higher education?
2013 (English)In: Quality in Higher Education, ISSN 1353-8322, E-ISSN 1470-1081, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 28-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Placements have the potential to contribute more effectively to the quality of higher education. The aim of this article is to discuss how placements can be made more worthwhile for individual students, while also contributing to the overall quality of teaching and learning at HEIs as well as to the development of workplace cultures that are conducive to learning. Work experience opportunities help students to build substantive relationships and apply what they are learning. Students’ overall view of their learning experience becomes more positive, their identification with their intended profession strengthens and academic performance improves, as do graduate employment rates. Introducing placements in the curriculum does not, however, guarantee these positive effects. Learning is likely to be greater if the experience is ‘intentional and recognised’ and tightly knit into the curriculum. Using evidence from research on workplace learning is one way to improve the quality of placements, as exemplified by a scholarly approach to the development of placements for pharmacy students at Uppsala University. HEIs’ interaction with employers through placements enriches both parties. Academics gain insights into practice which may inspire teaching on campus, e.g. by generating real life examples that trigger students’ motivation and by informing curriculum design. Practitioners supervising students on placements are often excellent educational development partners. Placements may also contribute to organisational development. Developing a reflective, deliberate approach to learning in the workplace may be as useful for the employees as for the students. Also, students may carry out projects of value to the employer, while also keeping the university informed of current practice. An increased engagement in students' work experience opportunities may improve the student experience, and contribute to bridging the academy-practice divide in a way that is as much about influencing the rest of society as being influenced by it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2013
Keywords
placements, workplace learning, employability, quality enhancement, higher education, work experience
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-67685 (URN)10.1080/13538322.2013.772697 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-03-27 Created: 2013-03-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0873-2519

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