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Lewis, Charlotte A.
Alternative names
Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Lewis, C. A., Jackson, J., Liv, P. & Wahlström, J. (2019). Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgical treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in a 16-year prospective study among male construction workers. In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices. Paper presented at PREMUS 2019 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Muscoluskeletal Disorders, Bologna, Italy, 2-5 September, 2019 (pp. 165-165).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational biomechanical risk factors for surgical treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in a 16-year prospective study among male construction workers
2019 (English)In: PREMUS 2019: 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders: From research to evidence based sustainable interventions and practices, 2019, p. 165-165Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Shoulder disorders are common in the general population, with an annual prevalence up to over 40% per 1000 person-years. One common disorder is subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), where a narrowing in the subacromial space causes compression of the tendons or bursa by the surrounding tissues. When conservative treatments are not effective, surgical treatments is often the alternative. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between occupational biomechanical exposures and the occurrence of surgically treated SIS in a large construction worker cohort over a 16-year follow-up period. 

Methods: A cohort of 280 747 male construction workers who participated in a national occupational health surveillance program (1971-1993) were examined prospectively (1987-2016) for SIS. SIS case status was defined by primary surgical treatment of diagnosis codes M75.1, M75.4, 726B, or 726C (ICD 10 and Swedish ICD 9 code systems), with data from the Swedish national registry for in- and out-patient surgery records. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was developed and biomechanical exposure estimates were assigned according to job title. Poisson regression models adjusted for age, BMI, smoking and a surgical time factor were used to estimate the relative risks (incidence rate ratios) of surgical treatment for SIS for each biomechanical factor.

Results: There were 1381 cases in the cohort, which corresponded to an incidence rate of surgically treated SIS over the 16-year observation period of 46 cases per 100,000 person years. Increased risk for surgically treated SIS was shown for working with elevated arms (RR=1.27, 95% CI=1.02-1.58), heavy upper arm loads (RR=1.75, 95% CI=1.48-2.08), high grip force (RR=1.64, 95% CI=1.40-1.93), working with hand tools (RR=1.46, 95% CI=1.26-1.70), working with hand tools in a fixed posture (RR=1.28, 95% CI=1.14-1.44), and working with hand-arm vibration (RR=1.30, 95% CI=1.09-1.55).

Conclusions: Working with elevated arms, high arm load, high grip force and vibrating handheld tools may increase the risk for SIS.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-163186 (URN)
Conference
PREMUS 2019 10th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Muscoluskeletal Disorders, Bologna, Italy, 2-5 September, 2019
Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved
Lewis, C. A. & Johnson, P. W. (2012). Whole-body vibration exposure in metropolitan bus drivers. Occupational Medicine, 62(7), 519-524
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whole-body vibration exposure in metropolitan bus drivers
2012 (English)In: Occupational Medicine, ISSN 0962-7480, E-ISSN 1471-8405, Vol. 62, no 7, p. 519-524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Back injuries are common in transit drivers, and can result in substantial direct and indirect cost to the employer and employee. Whole-body vibration (WBV) is one risk factor for drivers. Standards have been adopted (ISO 2631-1) to guide researchers in measuring and analysing WBV levels. Lately, a new standard has been added (ISO 2631-5) that takes impulsive exposures into account. Aims The aims of this study were to determine the levels of vibration for bus drivers using both ISO 2631-1 and 2631-5 standards, and whether there are differences in vibration levels and seat transmissibility between different road types. Methods Thirteen bus drivers drove a 7-year-old bus, instrumented to measure WBV in the seat and floor. The 52 km long test route included freeway, city streets and speed humps. Additionally, for comparison, a subset of five drivers also drove a car over the same route. Results Road type had a significant effect on all the vibration parameters. Based on exposure limit values in the standards, the continuous z-A(w)(8) exposures exceeded the limit value on freeways, and the impulsive z-VDV(8) and S-ed exposures were above limit values in city streets and speed humps. Bus WBV exposures were about twice as high relative to the car and the bus seat amplified rather than attenuated WBV exposures. Conclusions Bus drivers are potentially being exposed to daily vibration levels higher than recommended especially on certain road types. The current seat in this study does not attenuate the vibration.

Keywords
Bus drivers, ergonomics, whole-body vibration
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-61982 (URN)10.1093/occmed/kqs096 (DOI)000310124200009 ()
Available from: 2012-12-13 Created: 2012-12-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Åström, C., Lindkvist, M., Burström, L., Sundelin, G. & Karlsson, J. S. (2009). Changes in EMG activity in the upper trapezius muscle due to local vibration exposure.. Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, 19(3), 407-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in EMG activity in the upper trapezius muscle due to local vibration exposure.
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2009 (English)In: Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, ISSN 1050-6411, E-ISSN 1873-5711, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exposure to vibration is suggested as a risk factor for developing neck and shoulder disorders in working life. Mechanical vibration applied to a muscle belly or a tendon can elicit a reflex muscle contraction, also called tonic vibration reflex, but the mechanisms behind how vibration could cause musculoskeletal disorders has not yet been described. One suggestion has been that the vibration causes muscular fatigue. This study investigates whether vibration exposure changes the development of muscular fatigue in the trapezius muscle. Thirty-seven volunteers (men and women) performed a sub-maximal isometric shoulder elevation for 3min. This was repeated four times, two times with induced vibration and two times without. Muscle activity was measured before and after each 3-min period to look at changes in the electromyography parameters. The result showed a significantly smaller mean frequency decrease when performing the shoulder elevation with vibration (-2.51Hz) compared to without vibration (-4.04Hz). There was also a slightly higher increase in the root mean square when exposed to vibration (5.7% of maximal voluntary contraction) compared to without (3.8% of maximal voluntary contraction); however, this was not statistically significant. The results of the present study indicate that short-time exposure to vibration has no negative acute effects on the fatiguing of upper trapezius muscle.

National Category
Neurosciences Physiology
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-20909 (URN)10.1016/j.jelekin.2007.11.003 (DOI)18096405 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-03-27 Created: 2009-03-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Åström, C. (2008). Effects of vibration on muscles in the neck and upper limbs: with focus on occupational terrain vehicle drivers. (Doctoral dissertation). Umeå: Samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of vibration on muscles in the neck and upper limbs: with focus on occupational terrain vehicle drivers
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Occupational drivers of terrain vehicles are exposed to several risk factors associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in the lower back as well as in the neck and upper limbs. Vibration has been suggested to be a main risk factor. These drivers are exposed to both whole-body vibration (WBV) and hand-arm vibration (HAV). Aim: This study establishes the association between driving terrain vehicles and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the neck and upper limbs as well as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). In addition, this study examines the effect on muscles in the neck and upper limbs of the type of vibration exposure that occurs in occupational driving of terrain vehicles. Methods and results: In Paper I, a cross-sectional questionnaire study on occupational drivers of terrain vehicles, increased Prevalence Odds Ratios (POR) were found for numbness, sensation of cold and white fingers (POR 1.5-3.9) and for MSDs in the neck (POR 2.1-3.9), shoulder (POR 1.8-2.6) and wrist (POR 1.7-2.6). For the shoulders, neck and elbow, there appears to be a pattern of increased odds with increasing exposure time. In Paper II, an experimental study on the trapezius muscle, which included 20 men and 17 women, the mean frequency of the electromyography signal (EMGMNF) decreased significantly more in a three minute sub-maximal contraction without vibration (-3.71Hz and -4.37Hz) compared to with induced vibration (-3.54Hz and -1.48Hz). In Paper III, a higher initial increase of the mean of the root-mean-square of the electromyography signal (EMGRMS) was seen in a three minute sub-maximal contraction with vibration exposure compared to without vibration (0.096% vs. 0.045%). There was a larger mean EMGMNF decrease for NV compared to V in the total three minutes, and a larger decrease also in the first time period was seen for the NV compared to V. A small gender effect was also noticed. In Paper IV, the combination of HAV and WBV was studied in laboratory settings and resulted in a higher trapezius EMGRMS compared to the HAV and WBV separately. Conclusion: Occupational drivers of terrain vehicles are likely to experience symptoms related to HAVS and musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs. Local vibration does not seem to have any negative acute effects on trapezius muscle fatigue. Vibration exposure seems to cause an initial increase in muscle activity in the trapezius that could be related to recruitment on new motor-units. A combination of HAV and WBV causes a larger muscular demand on the trapezius muscle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Samhällsmedicin och rehabilitering, 2008. p. 76
Series
Umeå University medical dissertations, ISSN 0346-6612 ; 1135
Keywords
Electromyography, drivers, hand-arm vibration, trapezius, whole-body vibration
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-1668 (URN)978-91-7264-506-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-06-13, Aulan, Vårdvetarhuset, Umeå Universitet, 901 87, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-05-20 Created: 2008-05-20 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Åström, C., Rehn, B., Ahlgren, C. & Sundelin, G. (2007). Neuromusculoskeletal symptoms in the trunk and upper extremities among proffessional drivers of all-terrain vehicles in Sweden. In: (pp. S622).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neuromusculoskeletal symptoms in the trunk and upper extremities among proffessional drivers of all-terrain vehicles in Sweden
2007 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-7306 (URN)
Available from: 2008-01-08 Created: 2008-01-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Åström, C., Rehn, B., Lundström, R., Nilsson, T., Burström, L. & Sundelin, G. (2006). Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) and musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and the upper limbs in professional drivers of terrain vehicles: a cross sectional study. Applied Ergonomics, 37(6), 793-799
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) and musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and the upper limbs in professional drivers of terrain vehicles: a cross sectional study
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2006 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 793-799Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Adult, Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome/*epidemiology/*physiopathology, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology/*physiopathology, Off-Road Motor Vehicles, Questionnaires, Sweden/epidemiology, Upper Extremity/*physiopathology
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5999 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2005.09.004 (DOI)16380073 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-01-09 Created: 2008-01-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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