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Persson, Maurits
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Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Evertsson, L., Blom, B., Perlinski, M. & Rexvid, D. (2017). Can complexity in welfare professionals' work be handled with standardised professional knowledge?. In: Björn Blom, Lars Evertsson and Marek Perlinski (Ed.), Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practices (pp. 209-221). Bristol: Policy Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can complexity in welfare professionals' work be handled with standardised professional knowledge?
2017 (English)In: Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practices / [ed] Björn Blom, Lars Evertsson and Marek Perlinski, Bristol: Policy Press, 2017, p. 209-221Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Policy Press, 2017
Keywords
social caring professions
National Category
Social Work Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130696 (URN)978-1-4473-2719-6 (ISBN)978-1-4473-3651-8 (ISBN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-01-27 Created: 2017-01-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Blom, B., Evertsson, L. & Perlinski, M. (2017). European social and caring professions in transition. In: Björn Blom, Lars Evertsson and Marek Perlinski (Ed.), Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practicies (pp. 1-17). Bristol: Policy Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>European social and caring professions in transition
2017 (English)In: Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practicies / [ed] Björn Blom, Lars Evertsson and Marek Perlinski, Bristol: Policy Press, 2017, p. 1-17Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Policy Press, 2017
Keywords
social caring professions
National Category
Social Work Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130695 (URN)978-1-4473-2719-6 (ISBN)978-1-4473-3651-8 (ISBN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-01-27 Created: 2017-01-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Blom, B., Evertsson, L. & Perlinski, M. (Eds.). (2017). Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practices (1ed.). Bristol: Policy Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practices
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This collection provides new insights about current welfare professions in a number of European countries.

Focusing on research representing different types of European welfare states, including the Scandinavian and the Continental, the book offers in-depth understandings of professionals' everyday work within different contextual conditions, explored from empirical and theoretical perspectives. Subjects covered include knowledge and identity, education and professional development, regulation, accountability, collaboration, assessment and decision making.

This is a valuable contribution to the discussion of professionalism and welfare professions, offering lessons learned and ways forward.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Policy Press, 2017. p. 272 Edition: 1
Keywords
Professions, Professioner
National Category
Social Work Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130693 (URN)978-1-4473-2719-6 (ISBN)978-1-4473-3651-8 (ISBN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-01-27 Created: 2017-01-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Perlinski, M., Blom, B. & Evertsson, L. (2017). Social and caring professions in European welfare states: trends and challenges. In: Björn Blom, Lars Evertsson and Marek Perlinski (Ed.), Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practices (pp. 253-265). Bristol: Policy Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social and caring professions in European welfare states: trends and challenges
2017 (English)In: Social and caring professions in European welfare states: policies, services and professional practices / [ed] Björn Blom, Lars Evertsson and Marek Perlinski, Bristol: Policy Press, 2017, p. 253-265Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Policy Press, 2017
Keywords
social caring professions
National Category
Social Work Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130697 (URN)978-1-4473-2719-6 (ISBN)978-1-4473-3651-8 (ISBN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-01-27 Created: 2017-01-27 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Fors, R., Persson, M., Bergström, E., Stenlund, H., Stymne, B. & Stenberg, B. (2012). Lifestyle and nickel allergy in a Swedish adolescent population: effects of piercing, tattooing and orthodontic appliances. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 92(6), 664-668
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifestyle and nickel allergy in a Swedish adolescent population: effects of piercing, tattooing and orthodontic appliances
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2012 (English)In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 664-668Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of life-style practices in adolescents and their association with nickel allergy. Upper secondary school pupils (n = 4,376; 15-23 years) were patch-tested for nickel aller-gy, follow-ing completion of a questionnaire (answered by 6,095). Almost 86% girls and 21% of boys reported piercing. More girls (6%) than boys (3%) had a tattoo. Twenty-six percent of the girls and 18% of the boys were regular smokers. Vegetarian/vegan diets were reported by 20% of girls and by 6% of boys. Piercing, female gender, and vocational programme increased the risk of nickel allergy, whereas orthodontic appliance treat-ment prior to piercing reduced the risk of nickel allergy. Pupils in vocational programmes had the highest prevalence of nickel allergy. Lifestyle behaviours are interconnected and cluster in subgroups of adolescents. Female sex, piercing and choice of educational programme are prominent lifestyle markers. A trend shift is observed, where more girls than boys report tattooing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Society for the Publication of Acta Dermato - Venereologica, 2012
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-57100 (URN)10.2340/00015555-1305 (DOI)22278701 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-07-05 Created: 2012-07-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Fors, R., Stenberg, B., Stenlund, H. & Persson, M. (2012). Nickel allergy in relation to piercing and orthodontic appliances: a population study. Contact Dermatitis, 67(6), 342-350
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nickel allergy in relation to piercing and orthodontic appliances: a population study
2012 (English)In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 342-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Studies have shown conflicting results on the association between nickel exposure from orthodontic appliances and nickel sensitization.

Objectives & Method. In a cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between nickel sensitization and exposure to orthodontic appliances and piercings. 4376 adolescents were patch tested following a questionnaire asking for earlier piercing and orthodontic treatment. Exposure to orthodontic appliances was verified in dental records.

Results. Questionnaire data demonstrated a reduced risk of nickel sensitization when orthodontic treatment preceded piercing (OR 0.46; CI 0.27–0.78). Data from dental records demonstrated similar results (OR 0.61, CI 0.36–1.02), but statistical significance was lost when adjusting for background factors. Exposure to full, fixed appliances with NiTi-containing alloys (OR 0.31, CI 0.10–0.98) as well as a pooled ‘high nickel-releasing’ appliance group (OR 0.56, CI 0.32–0.97) prior to piercing was associated with a significantly reduced risk of nickel sensitization.

Conclusion. High nickel-containing orthodontic appliances preceding piercing reduces the risk of nickel sensitization by a factor 1.5–2. The risk reduction is associated with estimated nickel release of the appliance and length of treatment. Sex, age at piercing and number of piercings are also important risk indicators. Research on the role of dental materials in the development of immunological tolerance is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2012
Keywords
cross-sectional, dental braces, patch test, questionnaire, tolerance
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-3158 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02097.x (DOI)000311056000004 ()22631615 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council
Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2019-01-29Bibliographically approved
Shungin, D., Olsson, A. I. & Persson, M. (2010). Orthodontic treatment-related white spot lesions: a 14-year prospective quantitative follow-up, including bonding material assessment.. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, 138(2), 136.e1-8; discussion 136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orthodontic treatment-related white spot lesions: a 14-year prospective quantitative follow-up, including bonding material assessment.
2010 (English)In: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, ISSN 0889-5406, E-ISSN 1097-6752, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 136.e1-8; discussion 136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: White spots (WS) related to orthodontic treatment are severe cariologic and cosmetic complications, but they are shown to be partially reduced by remineralization or abrasion in short-term follow-ups. In this prospective study, we quantitatively analyzed changes in WS in general and in treatment-related white spot lesions (WSL) during orthodontic treatment and at a 12-year follow-up after treatment. In addition, we quantitatively compared the effects of an acrylic bonding material vs a glass ionomer cement (GIC) on WSL. METHODS: Sum areas of WS and WSL were calculated on scans of standardized photos of the vestibular surfaces of 4 teeth in consecutive orthodontic patients (median treatment time, 1.7 years) bonded with the 2 materials in a split-mouth design. Comparisons were made in 59 patients before treatment (BF), at debonding (T0), at 1 year (T1), and at 2 years (T2), and in 30 patients at a 12-year follow-up (T3) with the Friedman test followed by pairwise comparisons with the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test. Differences of the effects of acrylic vs GIC on the sum areas of WSL were tested for each observation period with the Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: Increases in the sum areas of WS and WSL from BF to T0 (P <0.001) were followed by significant decreases at T1 (P <0.001) and T2 (P <0.01 for WS; P <0.001 for WSL). Significant changes were also found in the sum areas for WS at T3 compared with T2 (P <0.01), but not for WSL (P = 0.328). The sum areas of WS and WSL at T3 did not return to BF levels (P <0.001). Sum areas of WSL were higher for surfaces bonded with acrylic compared with GIC for each observation period from BF to T2 (P >0.001), and from T2 to T3 (P >0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Although significantly reduced during the 12-year follow-up and significantly lower with the GIC than the acrylic material at bonding, WSL are a cariologic and cosmetic problem for many orthodontic patients.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-35649 (URN)10.1016/j.ajodo.2009.05.020 (DOI)000280604700006 ()20691346 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-08-27 Created: 2010-08-27 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Fors, R., Persson, M., Bergström, E., Stenlund, H., Stymne, B. & Stenberg, B. (2008). Nickel allergy: prevalence in a population of Swedish youths from patch test and questionnaire data. Contact Dermatitis, 58(2), 80-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nickel allergy: prevalence in a population of Swedish youths from patch test and questionnaire data
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2008 (English)In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The prevalence of body piercing and orthodontic treatment has increased during recent decades. Such changes in lifestyle may influence the occurrence of nickel allergy.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of nickel allergy in a Swedish youth population.

Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 6095 adolescents answered a questionnaire on their lifestyle and medical history, and 4439 consented to patch testing for contact allergy. Patch test results were adjusted for dropouts by a missing value analysis.

Results: The prevalence of self-reported dermatitis from contact with metal items was 14.8%. Patch testing showed nickel sensitization in 9.9% of the subjects, and in significantly more girls than boys, 13.3% versus 2.5%, respectively. Taking the dropout into account, the estimated true prevalence of nickel sensitivity evaluated by test reading at D4 is 11.8% in girls and 1.6% in boys.

Conclusions: The prevalence of nickel sensitization was higher for girls and slightly lower for boys compared with previous Swedish data. Self-reported information on metal dermatitis as an estimate of nickel allergy has low validity. When possible, missing value analysis should be performed to account for dropouts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: Munksgaard, 2008
Keywords
adolescent, lifestyle, missing value analysis, orthodontic treatment, patch test, questionnaire
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases Respiratory Medicine and Allergy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-21766 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0536.2007.01257.x (DOI)18186740 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-04-20 Created: 2009-04-20 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Fors, R. & Persson, M. (2006). Nickel in dental plaque and saliva in patients with and without orthodontic appliances.. European Journal of Orthodontics, 28(3), 292-297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nickel in dental plaque and saliva in patients with and without orthodontic appliances.
2006 (English)In: European Journal of Orthodontics, ISSN 0141-5387, E-ISSN 1460-2210, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 292-297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare the content of nickel in the saliva and dental biofilm in young patients with and without orthodontic appliances. The possible influence of a dietary intake of nickel on recorded nickel levels was examined. Nickel content in unstimulated whole saliva and in dental plaque of 24 boys and girls (mean age 14.8 years) with intraoral fixed orthodontic appliances was compared with 24 adolescents without such an appliance. Sample collection was set up to exclude nickel contamination. Diet intake was recorded for the preceding 48 hours to account for the influence of recent nickel content in food. Saliva and plaque were analysed for nickel content using an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) method. The acidified saliva samples were analysed as Millipore-filtered saliva with filter-retained fractions and plaque following dissolution in acids. No significant difference in nickel content of filtered saliva was found between the test and the control samples (P = 0.607); the median values of nickel content were 0.005 and 0.004 mug/g saliva, respectively. On the other hand, a significant difference was found for the filter-retained fraction (P = 0.008); median values for nickel were 25.3 and 14.9 mug/g, respectively. A significant difference in nickel content between test and control samples was also found in plaque collected at various tooth sites (P = 0.001; median values 1.03 and 0.45 mug/g, respectively). A stronger difference was found when comparing plaque collected from metal-covered tooth surfaces than from enamel surfaces of orthodontic patients. No association could be found between calculated dietary intake of nickel and recorded nickel in the test and control samples. It is concluded that nickel release occurs into the dental plaque and components of saliva of orthodontic patients, a situation that may reflect time dependence of its release from orthodontic appliances into the oral cavity and an aggregation of nickel at plaque sites.

National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22032 (URN)10.1093/ejo/cji091 (DOI)000238544400013 ()16415086 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-04-22 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
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