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Holmström, Anna
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Revill, J., Candia Carnevali, M. D., Forsberg, Å., Holmström, A., Rath, J., Khan Shinwari, Z. & Mancini, G. M. (2012). Lessons learned from implementing education on dual-use in Austria, Italy, Pakistan and Sweden. Medicine, Conflict and Survival, 28(1), 31-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons learned from implementing education on dual-use in Austria, Italy, Pakistan and Sweden
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2012 (English)In: Medicine, Conflict and Survival, ISSN 1362-3699, 1743-9396, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 31-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper provides insights into the achievements and challenges of implementing education on dual-use in four countries: Austria, Italy, Pakistan and Sweden. It draws attention to the different institutional mechanisms through which dual-use education may be introduced into academic curricula and some of the difficulties encountered in this process. It concludes that there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach to the implementation of dual-use education. Rather, initiatives must be tailored to suit the teaching traditions, geographical and historical context in which they are being delivered. However, a number of common principles and themes can be derived from all four cases. All these courses bring together a number of different topics that place ‘dual-use’ in the broader context of biosafety, biosecurity, ethics, law and the environment. The case studies suggest that success in this area depends largely on the leadership and commitment of individuals directly involved in teaching, who are active within the scientific community.

Keywords
biosecurity, biosafety, bioethics, Biological Weapons Convention, culture, interdisciplinary research, international security, dual use
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-55482 (URN)10.1080/13623699.2012.658624 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-05-16 Created: 2012-05-16 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Holmström, A., Oudin, A., de Luna, X., Nilsson, K., Lindgren, U., Bergdahl, I. & Ivarsson, A. (2011). SIMSAM-nätverket i Umeå strävar mot att bli ett framstående center för registerforskning som knyter samman barndomen med livslång hälsa och välfärd. SVEPET - Medlemstidning för Svensk Epidemiologisk Förening (SVEP), 29(3), 8-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SIMSAM-nätverket i Umeå strävar mot att bli ett framstående center för registerforskning som knyter samman barndomen med livslång hälsa och välfärd
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2011 (Swedish)In: SVEPET - Medlemstidning för Svensk Epidemiologisk Förening (SVEP), ISSN 1101-4385, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [sv]

Vetenskapsrådets SIMSAM initiativ syftar till att stärka multidisciplinär registerforskning i Sverige. Inom SIMSAM-nätverket i Umeå arbetar vi tvärvetenskapligt med sikte på att utvecklas till ett center med excellens kring mikrodataforskning som knyter samman barndomen med livslång hälsa och välfärd. Just nu fokuserar vi på att få tillgång till sammanlänkade data från ett flertal nationella och regionala register för att komma vidare med vår planerade forskning. Dessutom har Umeå-nätverket nyligen fått i uppdrag att leda den nationella samordningen av SIMSAM initiativet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Svensk epidemiologisk förening, 2011
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-54481 (URN)881251 (Local ID)881251 (Archive number)881251 (OAI)
Available from: 2012-04-27 Created: 2012-04-27 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Lindkvist, M., Lahti, K., Lilliehöök, B., Holmström, A., Ahlm, C. & Bucht, G. (2007). Cross-reactive immune responses in mice after genetic vaccination with cDNA encoding hantavirus nucleocapsid proteins.. Vaccine, 25(9), 1690-1699
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-reactive immune responses in mice after genetic vaccination with cDNA encoding hantavirus nucleocapsid proteins.
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2007 (English)In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1690-1699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in about 150,000 individuals in Eurasia, and several hundred cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) on the American continent annually. There is consequently a need for rapid diagnostics and effective prevention of hantaviral infections. In this study we have performed DNA-vaccination of mice with full-length genes encoding the immunogenic nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Puumala (PUUV), Seoul (SEOV) and Sin Nombre virus (SNV). The antibody reactivity towards the NPs, and deleted or truncated variants thereof, were studied to localise and investigate the major polyclonal B-cell epitopes. Our findings clearly show that the antibody reactivity in each immunised mouse is unique, not only in a quantitative respect (titers) but also in cross-reactivity and most likely also in the epitope specificity. Our experimental data in combination with B-cell prediction software indicate that strong homologous virus species specific and cross-reactive epitopes are located around amino acid residue 40 in the nucleocapsid proteins.

National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22245 (URN)10.1016/j.vaccine.2006.09.082 (DOI)17110000 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-05-04 Created: 2009-05-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08
Lindgren, L., Lindkvist, M., Överby, A., Ahlm, C., Bucht, G. & Holmström, A. (2006). Regions of importance for interaction of puumala virus nucleocapsid subunits. Virus genes, 33(2), 169-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regions of importance for interaction of puumala virus nucleocapsid subunits
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2006 (English)In: Virus genes, ISSN 0920-8569, E-ISSN 1572-994X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 169-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Puumala virus (PUUV) is a hantavirus that causes a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in northern and central Europe, and in large parts of Russia. The nucleocapsid (N) protein encoded by hantaviruses plays an important role in the life-cycle of these viruses, and one important function for the N-protein is to oligomerize, surround and protect the viral RNAs. We have identified amino- and carboxy-terminal regions involved in PUUV N-N interactions, which comprise amino acids 100-120 and 330-405. Our findings strengthen the hypothesis that the amino-terminus of the N-protein of hantaviruses holds a more regulatory function regarding N-N interactions, while conserved residues in the carboxy-terminal region, F335 together with F336 and W392, in concert with Y388 and/or F400 seems to play a more critical role in the PUUV N-N formation. This study provides evidence that the amino-terminal regions involved in the N-N interaction of Puumala virus are similar to those reported for Seoul virus (SEOV) and to some extent Hantaan virus (HTNV), even though the identity between PUUV N and SEOV/HTNV N is markedly lower than between PUUV N and Tula virus (TULV) N or Sin Nombre virus (SNV) N.

Keywords
Hantavirus, Nucleocapsid protein, Yeast two-hybrid, Protein–protein interactions, Puumala virus
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-22246 (URN)10.1007/s11262-005-0045-5 (DOI)16972031 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-05-04 Created: 2009-05-04 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Johansson, P., Olsson, M., Lindgren, L., Ahlm, C., Elgh, F., Holmström, A. & Bucht, G. (2004). Complete gene sequence of a human Puumala hantavirus isolate, Puumala Umeå/hu: sequence comparison and characterisation of encoded gene products.. Virus Research, 105(2), 147-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Complete gene sequence of a human Puumala hantavirus isolate, Puumala Umeå/hu: sequence comparison and characterisation of encoded gene products.
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2004 (English)In: Virus Research, ISSN 0168-1702, E-ISSN 1872-7492, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 147-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Puumala virus is a member of the hantavirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, and the major causative agent of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Europe. This study was conducted with a human Puumala virus isolate (PUUV Umeå/hu), and contains the determination of the first complete PUUV sequence from a human source. When the relationship to other Puumala viruses was analysed, a possible RNA segment exchange between two local strains of PUUV was noticed. Furthermore, the coding regions of PUUV Umeå/hu S- and M-segments were cloned, and a large set of gene products were expressed in mammalian cells. In addition, postulated N- and O-linked glycosylation sites in the two envelope proteins (Gn and Gc) were investigated individually by site-directed mutagenesis followed by gel-shift analysis. Our data demonstrate that N-linked glycosylation occurs at three sites in Gn (N142, N357 and N409), and at one site in Gc (N937). Also, one possible O-glycosylation site was identified in Gc (T985). We conclude that the diversity between different Puumala virus isolates is high, and consequently characterization of local PUUV isolates is important for clinical diagnostic work. Finally, the obtained results concerning the encoded gene products are of great importance for the design of new vaccines.

Keywords
Animals, COS Cells, Cercopithecus aethiops, Cloning; Molecular, DNA; Complementary, Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay, Gene Expression, Genes; Viral, Genome; Viral, Glycosylation, Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome/virology, Humans, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutagenesis; Site-Directed, Phylogeny, Protein Processing; Post-Translational, Puumala virus/classification/*genetics/isolation & purification, RNA; Viral/genetics/isolation & purification, Recombination; Genetic, Sequence Analysis; DNA, Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry/*genetics/metabolism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-15180 (URN)10.1016/j.virusres.2004.05.005 (DOI)15351488 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-01-08 Created: 2008-01-08 Last updated: 2018-06-09
Andersson, I., Simon, M., Lundkvist, A., Nilsson, M., Holmström, A., Elgh, F. & Mirazimi, A. (2004). Role of actin filaments in targeting of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein to perinuclear regions of mammalian cells.. J Med Virol, 72(1), 83-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of actin filaments in targeting of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein to perinuclear regions of mammalian cells.
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2004 (English)In: J Med Virol, ISSN 0146-6615, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 83-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Animals, Cell Line, Cercopithecus aethiops, Cricetinae, Cytoplasm/*metabolism, Golgi Apparatus/metabolism, Hemorrhagic Fever Virus; Crimean-Congo/*physiology, Microfilaments/*metabolism, Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics/*metabolism, Semliki forest virus/genetics/metabolism, Vero Cells, Virus Assembly
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-15177 (URN)14635015 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-11-30 Created: 2007-11-30 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Scaplehorn, N., Holmström, A., Moreau, V., Frischknecht, F., Reckmann, I. & Way, M. (2002). Grb2 and Nck act cooperatively to promote actin-based motility of vaccinia virus. Current Biology, 12(9), 740-745
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grb2 and Nck act cooperatively to promote actin-based motility of vaccinia virus
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2002 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 740-745Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family member N-WASP is a key integrator of the multiple signalling pathways that regulate actin polymerization via the Arp2/3 complex. Our previous studies have shown that N-WASP is required for the actin-based motility of vaccinia virus and is recruited via Nck and WIP. We now show that Grb2 is an additional component of the vaccinia actin tail-forming complex. Recruitment of Nck and Grb2 to viral particles requires phosphorylation of tyrosine residues 112 and 132 of A36R, the vaccinia actin tail nucleator, respectively. The presence of Grb2 on the virus is also dependent on the polyproline-rich region of N-WASP. The Grb2 pathway alone is therefore unable to nucleate actin tails, as its recruitment requires the prior recruitment of N-WASP by Nck. However, Grb2 does play an important role in actin-based motility of vaccinia, as in its absence, the mean number of actin tails per cell is reduced 2.6-fold. Thus, both Nck and Grb2 act in a cooperative manner to stabilize and/or activate the vaccinia actin-nucleating complex. We suggest that such cooperativity between "primary" and "secondary" adaptor proteins is likely to be a general feature of receptor-mediated signalling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2002
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-52989 (URN)12007418 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-03-09 Created: 2012-03-09 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Johansson, P., Lindgren, T., Lundström, M., Holmström, A., Elgh, F. & Bucht, G. (2002). PCR-generated linear DNA fragments utilized as a hantavirus DNA vaccine. Vaccine, 20(27-28), 3379-3388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PCR-generated linear DNA fragments utilized as a hantavirus DNA vaccine
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2002 (English)In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 20, no 27-28, p. 3379-3388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The field of DNA vaccines has grown rapidly, and since most such vaccines involve the inoculation of large circular DNA molecules previously propagated in bacteria, several inconveniences (e.g. the presence of antibiotic resistance genes, impurities from bacterial cultures or inefficient uptake of the large and bulky plasmid DNA molecules to the nucleus) are debated. In this study, we have explored the possibility of using smaller and more flexible PCR-generated linear DNA fragments instead. Phosphorothioate (PTO)-modified primers were used successfully to protect the PCR-generated DNA fragments from exonuclease degradation, and by using a nuclear localization signal-peptide to target the linear DNA to the nucleus the immune response against the encoded antigen was further improved. This approach was tested in cell culture using a sensitive reporter system and in vivo with DNA encoding the amino-terminus of the Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid protein. Our results indicate that linear DNA fragments have a great potential as a genetic vaccine and phosphorothioate modification in combination with a nuclear localization signal peptide increase the stability and targets the linear DNA molecules to the nucleus resulting in an improved biological response examined both in vitro and in vivo.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-4575 (URN)10.1016/S0264-410X(02)00265-7 (DOI)12213408 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2005-05-09 Created: 2005-05-09 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Rietdorf, J., Ploubidou, A., Reckmann, I., Holmström, A., Frischknecht, F., Zettl, M., . . . Way, M. (2001). Kinesin-dependent movement on microtubules precedes actin-based motility of vaccinia virus. Nature Cell Biology, 3(11), 992-1000
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinesin-dependent movement on microtubules precedes actin-based motility of vaccinia virus
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2001 (English)In: Nature Cell Biology, ISSN 1465-7392, E-ISSN 1476-4679, Vol. 3, no 11, p. 992-1000Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vaccinia virus, a close relative of the causative agent of smallpox, exploits actin polymerization to enhance its cell-to-cell spread. We show that actin-based motility of vaccinia is initiated only at the plasma membrane and remains associated with it. There must therefore be another form of cytoplasmic viral transport, from the cell centre, where the virus replicates, to the periphery. Video analysis reveals that GFP-labelled intracellular enveloped virus particles (IEVs) move from their perinuclear site of assembly to the plasma membrane on microtubules. We show that the viral membrane protein A36R, which is essential for actin-based motility of vaccinia, is also involved in microtubule-mediated movement of IEVs. We further show that conventional kinesin is recruited to IEVs via the light chain TPR repeats and is required for microtubule-based motility of the virus. Vaccinia thus sequentially exploits the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons to enhance its cell-to-cell spread.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2001
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-52996 (URN)10.1038/ncb1101-992 (DOI)11715020 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-03-09 Created: 2012-03-09 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Holmström, A., Olsson, J., Cherepanov, P., Maier, E., Nordfelth, R., Pettersson, J., . . . Forsberg, Å. (2001). LcrV is a channel size-determining component of the Yop effector translocon of Yersinia. Molecular Microbiology, 39(3), 620-632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LcrV is a channel size-determining component of the Yop effector translocon of Yersinia
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2001 (English)In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 620-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Delivery of Yop effector proteins by pathogenic Yersinia across the eukaryotic cell membrane requires LcrV, YopB and YopD. These proteins were also required for channel formation in infected erythrocytes and, using different osmolytes, the contact‐dependent haemolysis assay was used to study channel size. Channels associated with LcrV were around 3 nm, whereas the homologous PcrV protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced channels of around 2 nm in diameter. In lipid bilayer membranes, purified LcrV and PcrV induced a stepwise conductance increase of 3 nS and 1 nS, respectively, in 1 M KCl. The regions important for channel size were localized to amino acids 127–195 of LcrV and to amino acids 106–173 of PcrV. The size of the channel correlated with the ability to translocate Yop effectors into host cells. We suggest that LcrV is a size‐determining structural component of the Yop translocon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2001
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-5180 (URN)10.1046/j.1365-2958.2001.02259.x (DOI)000167052100008 ()11169103 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2006-05-11 Created: 2006-05-11 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
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