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Norberg, Matilda
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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Norberg, M., Bigler, C. & Renberg, I. (2010). Comparing pre-industrial and post-limed diatom communities in Swedish lakes, with implications for defining realistic management targets. Journal of Paleolimnology, 44(1), 233-242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing pre-industrial and post-limed diatom communities in Swedish lakes, with implications for defining realistic management targets
2010 (English)In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 233-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the 1960s and 1970s, acidification was identified as a major environmental problem in Scandinavia, Great Britain and North America. In Sweden, a liming program was launched in order to counteract the effects of acidification on surface waters. More than 30 years after large-scale liming began, there is still debate about whether liming actually achieves its goals, i.e., to prevent acidification in acid-sensitive surface waters and to restore natural conditions in acidified waters. We used Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and analogue matching of diatom assemblages in surface sediment samples (recent conditions) from 31 limed lakes and pre-industrial samples from 291 reference lakes to help answer the question as to whether the Swedish liming program achieves its goals. Diatoms are important primary producers in lakes and established indicator organisms for lake-water quality. First we compared pre-industrial with post-limed diatom communities to address the question whether liming causes unnatural conditions, i.e., diatom communities that have not previously occurred in Swedish lakes. Second, we addressed the issue of what is a realistic condition to use as a reference (natural condition) or a target in management programs. We found that the diatom communities in limed lakes were not different from the communities in the reference lakes. Most of the limed lakes had one or more analogues within the reference data set and many of them had at least one within-lake analogue. Hence, liming does not create unique diatom communities in lakes. Based on this and previous paleolimnological studies in Swedish lakes we suggest a conceptual model integrating the natural lake condition, the historical human impact, and the recent and contemporary human impact, when defining realistic targets in management programs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2010
Keywords
diatoms, reference condition, management target, European council water, framework directive, liming, acidification, paleolimnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-35852 (URN)10.1007/s10933-009-9399-3 (DOI)000277939200017 ()
Available from: 2010-09-08 Created: 2010-09-08 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Renberg, I., Bigler, C., Bindler, R., Norberg, M., Rydberg, J. & Segerström, U. (2009). Environmental history: A piece in the puzzle for establishing plans for environmental management. Journal of Environmental Management, 90(8), 2794-2800
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental history: A piece in the puzzle for establishing plans for environmental management
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2009 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 90, no 8, p. 2794-2800Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Establishment of plans for environmental planning and management requires that a number of natural and societal factors must be taken into consideration. Insights into the inherent dynamics of nature as well as the role that past human activities have played for establishing the current condition of the landscape and the natural environment in general are essential. Many natural and man-made changes occur over time scales of decades or centuries, and these are difficult to comprehend without a historical perspective. Such a perspective can be obtained using palaeoecological studies, i.e. by geochemical and biological analyses of lake sediment and peat deposits. To illustrate the long-term dynamics of nature and particularly the role of man, we present here five case studies from Sweden concerning pollution, lake acidification, lake eutrophication, biodiversity, and landscape dynamics and conservation – topics of broad interests – and discuss benefits of including a longer time perspective in environmental management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2009
Keywords
pollution, acidification, eutrophication, vegetation change, nature conservation, liming, environmental planning and management, palaeoecology
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-20581 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvman.2009.03.008 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-03-23 Created: 2009-03-23 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Norberg, M., Bigler, C. & Renberg, I. (2008). Monitoring compared with paleolimnology: implications for the definition of reference condition in limed lakes in Sweden.. Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, 146(1-3), 295-308
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring compared with paleolimnology: implications for the definition of reference condition in limed lakes in Sweden.
2008 (English)In: Environmental Monitoring & Assessment, ISSN 0167-6369, Vol. 146, no 1-3, p. 295-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Surface water acidification was identified as a major environmental problem in the 1960s. Consequently, a liming program was launched in Sweden in the 1970s. The primary purpose of liming is to restore conditions that existed prior to acidification. To reach this goal, as well as achieve ‘good status' (i.e. low levels of distortion resulting from human activity) in European freshwaters until 2016 under the European Union Water Framework Directive, lake data are required to define reference conditions. Here, we compare data from chemical/biological monitoring of 12 limed lakes with results of

paleolimnological investigations, to address questions of reference conditions, acidification, and restoration by liming. Using diatom-based lake-water pH inferences, we found clear evidence of acidification in only five of the 12 lakes, which had all originally been classified as acidified according to monitoring data. After liming, measured and diatom-inferred pH agree well in seven lakes. The sediment record of three of the five remaining lakes gave ambiguous results, presumably due to sediment mixing or low sediment accumulation rates. It is difficult to determine whether liming restored the lakes to a good status, especially as some of the lakes were not acidified during the twentieth century. In addition to acid deposition, other factors, such as natural lake and catchment ontogeny or human impact through agricultural activity, influence lake acidity. This study shows that monitoring series are usually too short to define reference conditions for lakes, and that paleolimnological studies are useful to set appropriate goals for restoration and for evaluation of counter measures.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-11340 (URN)10.1007/s10661-007-0081-9 (DOI)000260056300027 ()18058250 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-53649105143 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2008-12-16 Created: 2008-12-16 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
Guhrén, M., Bigler, C. & Renberg, I. (2007). Liming placed in a long-term perspective: a paleolimnological study of 12 lakes in the Swedish liming program. Journal of Paleolimnology, 37(2), 247-258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liming placed in a long-term perspective: a paleolimnological study of 12 lakes in the Swedish liming program
2007 (English)In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 247-258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the 1970s liming has been practised on a large scale in Sweden to mitigate acidification and several thousand lakes and streams are limed repeatedly. The Swedish monitoring program ISELAW (Integrated Studies of the Effects of Liming Acidified Waters) studies the long-term effects of liming. This paper summarizes the paleolimnological part of the program. Sediment cores from 12 lakes were analysed to study the development of the lakes from pre-industrial time until the present, and address questions about natural conditions and the effects of early human impact, acidification, and liming. Diatoms were used to reconstruct the pH history and to study shifts in species composition due to acidification and liming. Analyses of lead and spheroidal carbonaceous particles were applied for indirect dating and as indicators of the atmospheric deposition of pollutants associated with acid rain. Pollen analysis was performed in eight of the lakes to study the vegetation and agricultural history. The natural pH (prior to human disturbance) was between 5.3 and 6.5 in the eight lakes where the complete post-glacial sediment sequence was recovered. Pollen from anthropochores and apophytes indicated early agricultural land use in the vicinity of the lakes from 1000 to 2000 years ago, and pH increased with land use in six of these lakes. Five of the lakes have been acidified during recent decades, and in all 12 lakes some effects of liming were recorded in the diatom assemblage. The lakes show different responses to liming, including a return to a pre-acidification diatom composition or a shift to a state previously not recorded in the lake’s histories. This study accentuates the complexity of biological response to acidification and liming, and highlights the importance of historical perspectives to assess the current state of a lake’s ecosystem and to establish adequate restoration goals.

Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-11880 (URN)doi:10.1007/s10933-006-9014-9 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-03-15 Created: 2007-03-15 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
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