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Murina, Victoriia
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Kasari, V., Pochopien, A. A., Margus, T., Murina, V., Turnbull, K. J., Zhou, Y., . . . Hauryliuk, V. (2019). A role for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ABCF protein New1 in translation termination/recycling. Nucleic Acids Research, 47(16), 8807-8820
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A role for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ABCF protein New1 in translation termination/recycling
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2019 (English)In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 47, no 16, p. 8807-8820Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Translation is controlled by numerous accessory proteins and translation factors. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, translation elongation requires an essential elongation factor, the ABCF ATPase eEF3. A closely related protein, New1, is encoded by a non-essential gene with cold sensitivity and ribosome assembly defect knock-out phenotypes. Since the exact molecular function of New1 is unknown, it is unclear if the ribosome assembly defect is direct, i.e. New1 is a bona fide assembly factor, or indirect, for instance due to a defect in protein synthesis. To investigate this, we employed yeast genetics, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and ribosome profiling (Ribo-Seq) to interrogate the molecular function of New1. Overexpression of New1 rescues the inviability of a yeast strain lacking the otherwise strictly essential translation factor eEF3. The structure of the ATPase-deficient (EQ2) New1 mutant locked on the 80S ribosome reveals that New1 binds analogously to the ribosome as eEF3. Finally, Ribo-Seq analysis revealed that loss of New1 leads to ribosome queuing upstream of 3′-terminal lysine and arginine codons, including those genes encoding proteins of the cytoplasmic translational machinery. Our results suggest that New1 is a translation factor that fine-tunes the efficiency of translation termination or ribosome recycling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164896 (URN)10.1093/nar/gkz600 (DOI)000490576900040 ()31299085 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-03783Swedish Research Council, 201504746Swedish Research Council, 2017-04663Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelseThe Kempe Foundations, JCK1627The Kempe Foundations, SMK-1349Magnus Bergvall Foundation, 2017-02098Åke Wiberg Foundation, M14-0207EU, Horizon 2020, 2643Swedish Research Council, 2017-03783
Available from: 2019-11-05 Created: 2019-11-05 Last updated: 2019-12-09Bibliographically approved
Murina, V., Kasari, M., Takada, H., Hinnu, M., Kumar Saha, C., Grimshaw, J. W., . . . Atkinson, G. C. (2019). ABCF ATPases Involved in Protein Synthesis, Ribosome Assembly and Antibiotic Resistance: Structural and Functional Diversification across the Tree of Life. Journal of Molecular Biology, 431(18), 3568-3590
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ABCF ATPases Involved in Protein Synthesis, Ribosome Assembly and Antibiotic Resistance: Structural and Functional Diversification across the Tree of Life
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 431, no 18, p. 3568-3590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Within the larger ABC superfamily of ATPases, ABCF family members eEF3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and EttA in Escherichia coli have been found to function as ribosomal translation factors. Several other ABCFs including biochemically characterized VgaA, LsaA and MsrE confer resistance to antibiotics that target the peptidyl transferase center and exit tunnel of the ribosome. However, the diversity of ABCF subfamilies, the relationships among subfamilies and the evolution of antibiotic resistance (ARE) factors from other ABCFs have not been explored. To address this, we analyzed the presence of ABCFs and their domain architectures in 4505 genomes across the tree of life. We find 45 distinct subfamilies of ABCFs that are widespread across bacterial and eukaryotic phyla, suggesting that they were present in the last common ancestor of both. Surprisingly, currently known ARE ABCFs are not confined to a distinct lineage of the ABCF family tree, suggesting that ARE can readily evolve from other ABCF functions. Our data suggest that there are a number of previously unidentified ARE ABCFs in antibiotic producers and important human pathogens. We also find that ATPase-deficient mutants of all four E. coli ABCFs (EttA, YbiT, YheS and Uup) inhibit protein synthesis, indicative of their ribosomal function, and demonstrate a genetic interaction of ABCFs Uup and YheS with translational GTPase BipA involved in assembly of the 50S ribosome subunit. Finally, we show that the ribosome-binding resistance factor VmlR from Bacillus subtilis is localized to the cytoplasm, ruling out a role in antibiotic efflux.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
ribosome, translation, antibiotic resistance, ABCF, ARE
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-164649 (URN)10.1016/j.jmb.2018.12.013 (DOI)000484872800012 ()30597160 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060093624 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-25 Created: 2019-10-25 Last updated: 2019-10-25Bibliographically approved
Murina, V., Kasari, M., Hauryliuk, V. & Atkinson, G. C. (2018). Antibiotic resistance ABCF proteins reset the peptidyl transferase centre of the ribosome to counter translational arrest. Nucleic Acids Research, 46(7), 3753-3763
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibiotic resistance ABCF proteins reset the peptidyl transferase centre of the ribosome to counter translational arrest
2018 (English)In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 3753-3763Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several ATPases in the ATP-binding cassette F (ABCF) family confer resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS) antibiotics. MLS are structurally distinct classes, but inhibit a common target: the peptidyl transferase (PTC) active site of the ribosome. Antibiotic resistance (ARE) ABCFs have recently been shown to operate through direct ribosomal protection, but the mechanistic details of this resistance mechanism are lacking. Using a reconstituted translational system, we dissect the molecular mechanism of Staphylococcus haemolyticus VgaA(LC) and Enterococcus faecalis LsaA on the ribosome. We demonstrate that VgaA(LC) is an NTPase that operates as a molecular machine strictly requiring NTP hydrolysis (not just NTP binding) for antibiotic protection. Moreover, when bound to the ribosome in the NTP-bound form, hydrolytically inactive EQ(2) ABCF ARE mutants inhibit peptidyl transferase activity, suggesting a direct interaction between the ABCF ARE and the PTC. The likely structural candidate responsible for antibiotic displacement by wild type ABCF AREs, and PTC inhibition by the EQ(2) mutant, is the extended inter-ABC domain linker region. Deletion of the linker region renders wild type VgaA(LC) inactive in antibiotic protection and the EQ(2) mutant inactive in PTC inhibition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-147824 (URN)10.1093/nar/gky050 (DOI)000431137900041 ()29415157 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-06-09Bibliographically approved
Brodiazhenko, T., Johansson, M. J. O., Takada, H., Nissan, T., Hauryliuk, V. & Murina, V. (2018). Elimination of Ribosome Inactivating Factors Improves the Efficiency of Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell-Free Translation Systems. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9, Article ID 3041.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elimination of Ribosome Inactivating Factors Improves the Efficiency of Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell-Free Translation Systems
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 3041Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cell-free translation systems based on cellular lysates optimized for in vitro protein synthesis have multiple applications both in basic and applied science, ranging from studies of translational regulation to cell-free production of proteins and ribosome-nascent chain complexes. In order to achieve both high activity and reproducibility in a translation system, it is essential that the ribosomes in the cellular lysate are enzymatically active. Here we demonstrate that genomic disruption of genes encoding ribosome inactivating factors – HPF in Bacillus subtilis and Stm1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae – robustly improve the activities of bacterial and yeast translation systems. Importantly, the elimination of B. subtilis HPF results in a complete loss of 100S ribosomes, which otherwise interfere with disome-based approaches for preparation of stalled ribosomal complexes for cryo-electron microscopy studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
HPF, Stm1, Bacillus subtilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-tree translation system
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-155100 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2018.03041 (DOI)000453653000001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-4680Swedish Research Council, 2017-04663Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelseMagnus Bergvall Foundation, 2017-02098Åke Wiberg Foundation, M14-0207
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Crowe-McAuliffe, C., Graf, M., Huter, P., Takada, H., Abdelshahid, M., Novácek, J., . . . Wilson, D. N. (2018). Structural basis for antibiotic resistance mediated by the Bacillus subtilis ABCF ATPase VmlR. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(36), 8978-8983
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structural basis for antibiotic resistance mediated by the Bacillus subtilis ABCF ATPase VmlR
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 36, p. 8978-8983Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria employ ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs) to confer resistance to clinically important antibiotics. In Bacillus subtilis, the RPP VmlR confers resistance to lincomycin (Lnc) and the streptogramin A (SA) antibiotic virginiamycin M (VgM). VmlR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein of the F type, which, like other antibiotic resistance (ARE) ABCF proteins, is thought to bind to antibiotic-stalled ribosomes and promote dissociation of the drug from its binding site. To investigate the molecular mechanism by which VmlR confers antibiotic resistance, we have determined a cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of an ATPase-deficient B. subtilis VmlR-EQ(2) mutant in complex with a B. subtilis ErmDL-stalled ribosomal complex (SRC). The structure reveals that VmlR binds within the E site of the ribosome, with the antibiotic resistance domain (ARD) reaching into the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) of the ribosome and a C-terminal extension (CTE) making contact with the small subunit (SSU). To access the PTC, VmlR induces a conformational change in the P-site tRNA, shifting the acceptor arm out of the PTC and relocating the CCA end of the P-site tRNA toward the A site. Together with microbiological analyses, our study indicates that VmlR allosterically dissociates the drug from its ribosomal binding site and exhibits specificity to dislodge VgM, Lnc, and the pleuromutilin tiamulin (Tia), but not chloramphenicol (Cam), linezolid (Lnz), nor the macrolide erythromycin (Ery).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences, 2018
Keywords
ABC ATPase, cryo-EM, ribosome, antibiotic resistance, VmlR
National Category
Microbiology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-151767 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1808535115 (DOI)000443555000057 ()30126986 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-4680Swedish Research Council, 2015-04746Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelseCarl Tryggers foundation , CTS 34EU, Horizon 2020, 5966
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
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